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74

Beautiful Mind: Episode 5

As one string of mysteries races to its explosive conclusion, a new set emerges to take its place. Our leads must decide quickly who they can trust, and who their real enemies are. It is an hour of bitter pills, slippery slopes, and uphill battles, as the truth begins to dawn around those brave enough to see it.

 

 
EPISODE 5 RECAP

A teenage Young-oh fearfully opens the door to his classroom. Immediately he is assaulted by his classmates and they begin violently grabbing him, rubbing his face with some kind of white paste. Assuming he’s being attacked, he fights back, grabs a nearby broom, and begins to mercilessly beat one of his assailants.

As he spins around looking for more assailants, he notices the cake, balloons, and party hats his classmates are holding for the first time, and realizes his horrible mistake.

Later that day, after Young-oh has been expelled from school, his father comes to meet him at the school gates. Without wasting a breath, he launches into his own defense, explaining that he wasn’t the one that started the fighting. His classmates ambushed him from behind so it was impossible for him to read their faces and understand the situation. How could he have known? Unsympathetic, his father responds that from now on, the one thing Young-oh must always be the most afraid of is himself.

He advises his son not to rely on his own feelings because those will certainly mislead him. Instead, he should always act as other people do: laugh only when they laugh, and cry only when they cry.

Young-oh tries to do as his father requested by going to a movie theater, where he’s surrounded by people laughing at the comedic antics on screen. He does his best to try and smile like the rest of them, but when all he can muster up is a failed facsimile of a grin, he dishearteningly turns his attention to his popcorn.

We then transition to seeing him as an adult as he watches a tragedy with Min-jae. He seems surprised when he notices all the people sniffling around him, and at least tries to take on a somber mood in order to fit in.

Back in the present day, Jin-sung arrests Young-oh for the mysterious string of murders at Hyunsung, spitting out his Miranda rights. She handcuffs herself to him when he tries to push past her and return to his surgery. With time racing away from him, he frantically explains that the only person with knowledge of the key evidence explaining the deaths of Chief Direction Shin and the motorcyclist is dying on his operating table as they speak.

She isn’t persuaded. Those two deaths occurred on Young-oh’s operating table after all. She couldn’t do anything to prevent those, but she refuses to stand by and let a third one happen.

He then grabs her by the neck to choke her but Jin-sung remains clearheaded while she explains. Young-oh is in violation of a certain psychotropic drug control act; therefore she can arrest him immediately without a warrant. She holds up the case containing his medicine, taken from his locker, to rest her case.

Back in the operating room, the remaining surgical staff panic as Young-oh fails to arrive. Out of time, Young-oh drags Jin-sung to the surgery room by their joined wrists, determined to save this crucial patient/witness, but he returns to find that all is in order—his father has taken over. Young-oh looks on in disbelief as the impact of his father’s betrayal courses through him.

At the police station, detectives from the Violent Crimes Unit observe from behind one-way glass as Jin-sung begins her interrogation of Young-oh. When one detective asks if they are simply going to accept Jin-sung into their team, their team leader nonchalantly remarks that this is a test to see if she has what it takes.

Insulted at being detained and deprived yet again of his surgery, Young-oh asks Jin-sung if she thinks he’s stupid enough to brazenly commit not one, but two murders on his own operating table; and if so, how will his personal medication connect him to these alleged crimes? She replies with her own questions, like why his father would ask her to arrest his own son if he wasn’t involved. And, if his medicine doesn’t provide evidence for his misdeeds, at the very least it gives her some time to get a confession out of him while they wait on the lab results to ascertain what they are. She knows she’s doing things out of order, and she doesn’t care.

Apparently, the lab works quickly, because a minute later another police officer comes in to let her know the results have arrived. The lab results are telling, but not for the reason Jin-sung anticipated: the contents of the ampoules were vitamins. She pointedly tells Young-oh that he too is probably surprised by the results, because had he known they were merely vitamins he would never have come with her all the way to police station. Clearly his conscious is guilty, but why?

Young-oh gets up to leave, frustrated with her rashness and overall obtuseness, and tells her the person that needed the extra time wasn’t her, but rather his father, Dr. Lee. He tells her that she should have considered the reasons why his father turned him in before arresting him, instead of jumping to obvious conclusions simply because they are convenient and support her previously held suspicions.

Once Young-oh is gone, the team leader of the Violent Crimes Unit takes Jin-sung to task for her unethical and reckless behavior. Falsely accusing an innocent person is an abuse of her authority, and furthermore, should Young-oh end up being the actual criminal, she’s given him a chance to run away or tamper with potential evidence after failing to pin him with any physical evidence before detaining him. He advises her to smarten up and get it together.

Young-oh races back to the hospital, intent on finding the surgery records for Dr. Shim. When Min-jae reaches out to get his attention for a greeting, he violently pins her against the wall before recognizing her. They exchange looks of shock, then without a word, he rushes on to intercept his father in the elevator.

Young-oh demands to know what his father is up to—why stop him from performing the surgery on Dr. Shim? He argues that he could have done it perfectly. Dr. Lee rejects his claim, citing his increasingly erratic behavior: kicking out the staff, violent outbursts, and leaving in the middle of surgery, as indicators of why he would have failed yet again.

Young-oh isn’t surprised to hear that his father has all his little spies watching him—he caught one after all, Dr. Kim, when she went to report to him that night after her daughter’s surgery. He wonders why it is his own father who doubts him the most and continually obstructs him.

Dr. Lee sneers at Young-oh’s pitiful attempt to guilt him. Without him, Young-oh would have been nothing but an abandoned baby. He was the one that turned Young-oh into a human being.

Even now, the reason Young-oh has returned to Korea and come to Hyunsung Hospital is because he still needs his father. What happened today was Dr. Lee’s greatest fear come to life: Young-oh getting caught for being different. Young-oh’s eyes water, deeply affected by this revelation.

In the woods, Director Kang meets with his father to request an investment in a new business venture of selling beds. His father grows enraged by the request and points his hunting gun at his son, saying he should’ve never been born. He wonders if his son is becoming arrogant because he allows him to run the hospital. Why else would he think he can get money to begin an unprofitable business venture?

Attempting to ease the tension, Assistant Manager Chae assures the Chairman that his son is working hard and his efforts have improved the company’s image to the public.

After their father leaves, his older brother tells Director Kang to leave the money-making to him, and just stay out of trouble. He mentions the scandalous gossip spreading about the death of Chief Director Shin, and warns him to get a handle on those rumors, otherwise their company stock will be in danger. Like father, like son, he cocks his rifle and points it at his little brother to seal the warning, then laughs it off before following after his father.

In the hospital Min-jae battles sexism and elitism as she confronts her professor for omitting her name from her research thesis and listing another doctor that had nothing to do with it instead.

The professor gives some half-assed excuse for overlooking her, and moans about delusional female doctors ignoring the politics of the hospital and thinking they can advance to leadership positions. Furthermore, he adds, someone like her from some third-rate medical school will probably never be appointed a professor, so she should just give it up already.

Through gritted teeth she reminds him that he promised her; for three years he promised her. He shrugs and quips, Oops, sorry.

In the hallway, Min-jae runs into Young-oh with tears in her eyes, and he slowly, tenderly, reads the distress on her face then pulls her into a soothing embrace. She asks why he didn’t want to know the reason for her tears. After a moment of reflection he replies serenely that to him it’s more important to address her sadness. She seems pleased with his answer and gazes at him lovingly. He promises to be a better man for her.

Shi-hyun accidentally interrupts their intimate moment, causing the couple to separate suddenly. She gives them the hairy eyeball but keeps her thoughts to herself. When Young-oh presses to hear her thoughts, she rolls her eyes and replies, “Genius or not, in front of a beautiful woman, you’re the same as an ordinary person.” He smiles to himself as she hurries away and muses, “Same as an ordinary person.”

In a better mood, Young-oh requests of his father to be Dr. Shim’s primary doctor. Dr. Lee scoffs at his audacity and refuses. Young-oh argues that she’s the only one who can prove his innocence so he has the most incentive to give her the best care. He adds pointedly, isn’t that after all what his father wants most as well? Backed into a corner, Dr. Lee concedes.

Director Kang comes by to see Young-oh in order to inquire about the currently defunct mortality conference, and his failure to uphold his part of the promise. Young-oh reassures Director Kang that all will be dealt with in time for tomorrow’s JCI accreditation.

Suk-joo also comes to ask about the condition of Dr. Shim, who is currently in a coma. Young-oh replies cryptically that she probably doesn’t have much time left.

Young-oh goes to check on Dr. Shim, then begins closing all the windows and doors to ensure that they are alone. He then picks up a large glass jar and slams it on the ground while observing Dr. Shim. He creeps in close and whispers into her ear. “It’s time to get up now Dr. Shim Eun-ha. I know everything. Did you sleep well?” Fearfully, she opens her eyes.

Back at her day job, Jin-sung writes speeding tickets out on the street. Sergeant Park comes by to see her and drops some food on her lap to cheer her up. They talk shop for a bit, until Jin-sung asks with a lump in her throat why this is all she is capable of. He sighs and tells her to sleep it off.

Across the street, a man steals a woman’s purse and tries to make his getaway by motorcycle. He only makes it a few feet before colliding with a nearby wall. He tumbles off his bike and Jin-sung arrives to arrest him. Upon removing his helmet she is taken aback to find the dead motorcyclist’s hearing impaired son before her.

Young-oh continues to press Dr. Shim for answers regarding her research, but her voice shakes as she explains that if she tells him, “he’ll” kill her. At first, Young-oh promises to help her no matter what. When that fails to generate the answers he needs, he resorts to coercion; threatening to tell the entire ward that she’s now awake. He encourages her to consider her decision carefully.

We then see him step out of her room but remain nearby as he looks at his watch. Like clockwork, the alarms for Dr. Shim sound and after a brief effort to resuscitate her by Suk-joo, Young-oh strolls back into the room, shuts off the vitals monitor, and pronounces her dead.

His clinical, detached attitude as he wraps up Dr. Shim’s postmortem as succinctly as possible deservedly earns him the disgusted gapes of everybody in the room.

All is not as it seems, as a very much alive Dr. Shim is transported out of the hospital and back to her loved ones. We cut back to the conversation between Young-oh and Dr. Shim where he gave her the choice to trust him or be exposed. Terrified, she confessed that if she were to utter a single word of what she knows within the walls of the hospital, she would be killed.

Prepared for this outcome, Young-oh offered an alternative: adenosine, a drug that will orchestrate two minutes of cardiac arrest and effectively deceive the vitals monitor into thinking she is dead. She’ll get her Juliet moment and then be safely moved out of the hospital.

Looking out upon a rainy city, Young-oh meets with Dr. Kim and accuses her of the murders of the motorcyclist and Chief Director Shin. The cause of death is a modified cell that has a new immune system—one that has never once been reported to academia—a new medical treatment that was applied in the same way in multiple people.

Therefore, the primary physician of the two must be the same person, and that was none other than Chief Director Shin. This is precisely the reason Dr. Kim killed him.

Arguably, Young-oh adds, the two most important people int he operating room are the operating surgeon and the anesthesiologist. So by his logic, if he didn’t do it, then there’s only one other person who could have.

Outside, ambulance sirens wail, and Dr. Kim abruptly leaves Young-oh in order to intercept a slew of incoming patients. She searches desperately for an injured child between the ages of five and ten, who would be capable of donating their heart to her daughter. Failing to find one, she shouts at the emergency workers and patients until Suk-joo pulls her back inside to calm down.

In the hospital, she tries to explain herself, but Suk-joo cuts her off and assures her that he understands. She tearfully begs him to succeed in saving her daughter.

At the police station, Jin-sung sits the motorcyclist’s son down for a warm meal, but her gesture is rejected. Losing her patience, she accuses him of being dumb, because why else would he steal a purse when there’s a police car right in front of him? She walks outside for some air where Sergeant Park joins her. He tells her it’s likely that the young boy will get out on probation since it is his first offense.

For tonight they can release him to his parents… but their hearts ache as they remember he’s totally alone in the world. Anguished, Jin-sung asks:

“The person that did wrong is someone else, but why then does he have to receive punishment?”

Through the window, Jin-sung sees the boy hungrily wolfing down the food she bought for him.

The next morning, Jin-sung goes to the boy’s house to restock essentials like underwear and towels. She finds the house in complete disarray; trash and dishes piled high in every corner. Posted on the walls are sweet reminder notes written by his father to eat well and take care of himself.

Sighing heavily, she gets to work straightening up and doing the dishes. A little while later she stands on a chair to fix a flickering bulb. A sound from behind prompts her to turn, and she loses her balance in the process, only to be caught by Young-oh.

He tells her to stay calm and not to scream, since neither of them is thrilled to see the other. She sheepishly asks if it’s ok to scream if she’s actually happy to see him. Contrite, she tells him she’s sorry for arresting him and has reflected on her actions. Bemused, he accepts.

While Jin-sung continues with the housework, Young-oh begins rummaging through drawers and cupboards in search of anything identifying the motorcyclist’s primary doctor, since the hospital had no medical records of his treatment. Jin-sung stops him, saying he won’t find anything, even she had thought through that possibility but came up empty.

Not willing to take her word for it, he continues to search. Meanwhile, Jin-sung wonders aloud about what kind of father would report his son to the police. She points out the notes around the house as the type of father-son relationship she is accustomed to. She does not understand the relationship Young-oh has with Dr. Lee.

Her comment sparks something in Young-oh, and he notices the notes for the first time. At first it seems like he is interested in the loving relationship so unlike his, but then he flips over the paper to reveal the prescriptions.

At Hyunsung Hospital, Suk-joo looks on with mixed emotions as Assistant Manager Chae oversees the dismantling of Chief Director Shin’s office. He wonders aloud if it is right to just move on so quickly after such a huge loss. Assistant Manager Chae enjoins him to focus on making the regenerative medical treatment research a success if he wants to honor Chief Director Shin’s memory.

Alone in Chief Director Shin’s office, Suk-joo wistfully looks around one last time. Right before he is about to leave, the fax machine begins to beep as sheets begin to print out.

He recalls Jin-sung telling him right after Chief Director’s Shin’s death that she was supposed to receive the motorcyclist’s original treatment records from the insurance company since there were no records in Hyunsung. What he finds prompts him to make a call to the primary physician, but we don’t hear who that is.

Young-oh wastes no time and meets with Director Kang to unveil his findings. He states that the murderer has to be someone with enough power to steal the motorcyclist’s heart, prescribe diabetes medicine to Chief Director Shin, intimidate Dr. Shim, and plant a staff member in a surgery room. The two men exchange knowing glances and concoct a plan to reveal everything at the JCI accreditation meeting, and thus clear Young-oh of all suspicions. However, we still don’t hear who the culprit is.

Later, Young-oh meets with his father to ask who he wants to protect most of all: himself? His son? Confused by his questioning, Dr. Lee asks what he means. With a smirk, Young-oh promises his father that for now, he is safe.

We flash back to the scene from the first episode when the motorcyclist barged into Assemblyman Kim’s speech and began attacking the assemblyman. But now, we can see that in fact he was aiming for Assistant Manager Chae, who stood behind the assemblyman.

On the prescription sheets we see Assistant Manager Chae listed as the motorcyclist’s primary doctor, and the pieces start to come together as Suk-joo comes to find him, freshly faxed records in-hand.

At the JCI conference, Director Kang explains to the audience that the two recent mysterious deaths at the hospital were not medical errors but, in fact, murders. Murders engineered by someone at this very hospital, in fact. The tension builds as Director Kang takes one long look around the room full of the hospital’s doctors and announces, “The culprit is none other than Dr. Lee Young-oh.”

Young-oh, having just reached the podium to speak, blinks; confused by the accusation. He asks what in the world Director Kang is talking about, and with what evidence he’s accusing him with. Clearly things are not going as planned. Young-oh steels himself for a second betrayal but isn’t prepared for a third.

Suddenly, Min-jae stands up and declares that she will be the one to prove that Young-oh is the culprit. After all, he is a dangerous person that cannot be allowed to remain in the hospital— someone with anti-social personality disorder—or in other words, a psychopath.

 
COMMENTS

The reveal of Assistant Manager Chae as the culprit isn’t actually that surprising. I think if they had done it maybe one episode ago it would’ve been more impactful and shocking. At this point, we’ve kind of gone around the Ferris wheel enough times to rule out Dr. Lee, Suk-joo, and even Young-oh. Assistant Manager Chae was the only one not given up as a suspect, which made him the most likely culprit. Moreover, he was the only one not preoccupied with some other personal or professional drama, which frees him up to commit homicide. He was just kind of along for the ride, with his placid, suspicious smile. Pointing all the fingers at Dr. Lee basically ruled him out early on since it that would be far too simple. Thus, I’m grateful for the Min-jae betrayal twist to keep things fresh. However, since Young-oh believed it was his father for the large part of the mystery it gave us some very insightful exchanges. I will say that the whole “don’t get caught” refrain was getting a little old, so it’s exciting to see it get pushed out into the open by Min-jae. It will be interesting to see the status quo change irreversibly.

Regarding, Assistant Manager Chae, I fully expect to get more fleshed out flashbacks of his currently nebulous motivations, but I am interested to see more of flashbacks from Dr. Lee’s perspective. Omitting the first episode, the majority of the flashbacks are from Young-oh’s perspective as his father provided a domineering force in those. But now that we know who the murderer is we don’t have to keep Dr. Lee at arm’s length to service the plot; we can dig a little deeper.

There is one thing I don’t understand: Dr. Lee reported Young-oh to Jin-sung under the premise that he is in possession of psychotic drugs, knowing full well that it was actually only vitamins. Which means that Young-oh would never be booked for anything. He obviously did it to get Young-oh out of the surgery since he was so adamant on performing it and could not be persuaded otherwise, and essentially to protect Young-oh from himself. But what I don’t get is, if Dr. Lee is so determined to hide Young-oh’s condition from the world, why is he going around telling the police about it? Was he just so desperate to get him out of the way to prevent another death that he had no choice, or was it an attempt to get him out of the hospital for good?

Min-jae added a few more layers to her character but mostly all at the end. Until that point she wasn’t woven into the central plot, she seemed mostly just tangential, or a vehicle to see sides of Young-oh we are otherwise not permitted to see. I think for now we are supposed to believe she betrayed Young-oh to further her ambitions, but I think we’re only just starting to unravel her motivations.

I like that Director Kang is getting a character arc and that he isn’t merely a plot device to fulfill the drama’s chaebol quota. His interaction with his older brother was really thick with tension in a way that wasn’t evident with his father. His father clearly wishes Director Kang would just disappear on his own, but his older brother doesn’t seem content with that. It will be interesting to see how the inner family dynamics affect Director Kang’s decision-making power in the future.

Jin-sung got some much needed downtime to reflect on her recent problematic behavior in this episode. With her out of the way the mystery of the irregular heart lesion was able to advance. There was no time spent on her making starry eyes or longing gazes at Suk-joo, which is a relief. It’s not that I didn’t like them, because they are really cute together, but no matter how many scenes there are, it never changes the nature of their relationship. I expect this is intentional, but after a while it is slightly repetitive. Better to let these characters spend time where they can experience real growth.

I like the calm, contemplative Jin-sung. I think she was let off the hook way too easily for her misconduct, but if it means with can get back to the hospital I guess I can overlook it. I like that the motorcyclist’s son was not forgotten in the abyss of abandoned plot threads, but I worry what anchoring a large portion of her emotional story with the boy will do to her overall character development. I wish we could give her more depth, maybe a deeper reason for why she acts the way that she does; not just the same old archetypical naive cop routine.

In the beginning, during their showdown in the locker room, Young-oh grabs Jin-sung’s neck, but nothing is ever said or done about it. Shouldn’t that be considered assault of a police officer? It’s fine if the plot requires Young-oh to leave without being charged, but I’m worried about the general glossing over of his frequently violent behavior. He also nearly assaults Min-jae later in the episode, but no one wants to talk about it or address it. It’s just kind of grouped together with all his other whacky and enigmatic behavior. Is this some kind of genius free pass? With this in mind, I can kind of get behind Min-jae and her description of Young-oh as a dangerous person.

On one last note, I wondered why Dr. Kim was in the operating room for her own daughter since that would seem to be a serious conflict of interest, as well as a bizarre staffing choice. However it now makes sense that it served a purpose plot-wise, although I still think it is unrealistic overall. Dr. Kim was being played as a desperate mother who will do anything to save the life of her child, and it is implied that the reason her daughter had the lesions was as a result of a risky medical procedure still under experimentation, offered by Chief Director Shin. We got a hint of Dr. Kim’s blind cruelty in this episode when she ran around looking for a heart donor, becoming shamelessly querulous when there were none. She’s definitely one to keep an eye on as the show progresses. Though we didn’t get confirmation, it would be interesting if the murder attempts were not completely unilateral, whereas Dr. Kim chose to kill Chief Director Shin to fulfill her own vengeance, but the death of the motorcyclist and the attempt on Dr. Shim was all Assistant Manager Chae.

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Really love Beautiful Mind - the acting, the suspense, the heartbreaking scenes.. Jang Hyuk deserves all the kudos he has been getting for this.

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Jang Hyuk was mesmerizing as LYO in ep 5, ep 6, it was the kind acting you expect from a serious, dark film that should get many awards. Not a drama that sounded like a decent thriller with some kind of love heals all kind of story.

He must get his credit due after this drama, for a character that is suppose to be emotionless, or people see as cold anti-social robot the way he portrayed LYO feelings was brilliant, brutally real this weeks eps.

The director is doing a great job too, its a very sleek, well directed drama that not even the flashbacks are wasted in their storytelling. Easily the most fascinating, smartest weekly kdrama at the moment.

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I think Jang Hyuk's performance in this drama can be compared with Ji Sung's in Kill Me Heal Me. Both are so engaging in their role. The ratings are unfortunate, though. I feel like this drama should get more recognition.

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Ratings is meaningless to fans of good drama, Doctor Crush is romantic cliche thats popular as easy watch of course it will have higher rating.

Specially as international fan i dont care what Koreans watch more of in a drama. Rating is pointless compared to quality otherwise the best American tv show would be CSI with the old 20 million viewer numbers and not award winning dramas that have 2 million viewers like The Wire, Soprano, Breaking Bad etc

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Agree. Doc Crush is not bad, but pretty much a typical formula cliche driven plot. IMO, this is one of the best shows going right now, along with "38".

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The Wire is one of my favorite American television shows. It was absolutely brilliant.

You might want to check out Tree With Deep Roots and Punch, these were smartly written and tightly made kdramas that you might enjoy. I actually wish that the writing and the story delivery of Beautiful Mind can be as tight as Punch because BM has so much potential.

And yes, Jang Hyuk blew me away with his acting, especially in episode six, wow.

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@doctordrama, iirc it was announced a while ago that the Punch writer is working on the script for a medical drama which I'm really looking forward to.

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@ Muhammed
as much as we like a show as international fans it is the korean ratings that gives the cast and crew their recognition and future work depends on it.. so it is sad the ratings are low because all the hard work they are doing will go unrecognised...

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they really stepped it up with ep 5 and 6 and im so on board with the romance angle, what a change from previous eps. im glad the female lead is better now and im loving the chemistry between the two. the last sequence of ep 6 broke my heart, i felt so bad for Dr lee. jang hyuk did such an amazing job. his acting was brilliant

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I completely agree!

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And btw the last scene was not the JCI conference, it was the mortality conference for Director Shin.

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This is a really good drama, very educational and interesting, lots of suspense. Not sure whether the father is good or bad, whether he experimented with his adopted son. the father is so cold and scary.
Jang hyuk is the best, he nailed it, you can see the pain in his eyes when he got betrayed. Hope to see more kmj, develop her character more.

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Now that everyone's motivations are falling into place, it's interesting how our three leads are kind of a perfect Freudian trio. Jin-sung is the Id, who acts on her emotions and has no filter when it comes to what she's feeling. Obviously this has gotten her into trouble.

Young-oh is the Superego, analytical and logical to a fault, obsessed with identifying and following social conventions and mores to fit in to earn his father's regard.

Suk-joo is the Ego, caught between his natural inclination to be a good person (id) and the fact that he's in deep with the shady clinical research (I suspect they're attempting to grow human organs from stem cells and something in the process is going wrong, hence the signature lesions in the hearts) and wants it to be successful, as well as his need to be seen as the good guy at all times (superego).

I'm interested to see how the drama deals with this setup!

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Very interesting comparison to Freud theory and the three characters and it fits well too specially Suk-Joo and Young Oh. LYO follows his logic almost too well, cant understand when people let emotions get in the way of his job, it was very clear in the eps this week.

Im losing patience with Suk-Joo for what you mentioned, he thinks he is the good guy in the situation when he is almost direct involved in the shady research and is lying to himself, protecting killers just for things that might do good later for patients. If he was honest he would know the others involved only care about the money they will make off killing people for the research.

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Agreed! I think they have a chance to do something really interesting with his character, it's such a loaded conflict but all he's really done so far is waffle around and drink. Hopefully, as he learns more, he'll have to choose to either actually be a good person and expose the truth (and his part in it, thereby giving up on having people think he's a good person), or swallow his feelings completely and go all in with his research.

I kind of feel for his character, but he really hasn't done enough for me to get a sense of him besides a vague niceness. Pick a lane, Suk-joo!

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We haven't been clued in to how much Suk-Joo knows about the research. He may have been unaware that they were doing human trials. He was unaware that the anesthesiologist's daughter had been treated by his superior (with the experimental medicine/tissue?) even though he was her physician.

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Very interesting! Thank you for highlighting that. I learnt something new today.

I'm not sure if they are growing new organs, or if they are trying to create something to repair organs? Because Director Shin did say that his dream was for there to be no need for surgeons anymore. Perhaps this experimental thing was given to people with existing organ problems but ended up making it worse and added on heart problems as well.

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Well stem cells are cells by which we are made of. When we are first conceived we are a mass of stem cells that, as time goes by, develop and grow. Stem cells can become any organ. Their research invludes such cells, it is a topic of research that has been going on for a very long time.

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Yeah I know what you are saying. But if they grew new organs they would still need surgeons to transplant the new organs into people and remove the damaged ones. I'm basing my assumption on this random conversation Dr Shin had with Suk Joo about what is dream was: to remove the need for surgeons to operate.
Of course I could be totally wrong and reading too much into just a random conversation.

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I just started Beautiful Mind and so far I am intrigued. I am still trying to get behind Young-oh because he is a dick and Jang Hyuk's acting has always seemed over the top for me but he is playing Young-oh really well so far.

Jin-sung is so freaking annoying running all over the place accusing everyone and their mamas so I was really glad she was on chill mode this episode.

It's not the best show I've ever seen but I like it better than Doctors so I will be tuning in. Hopefully they keep it interesting.

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Completely agree with you. Episodes 5 & 6 just make the show more interesting. I'm so so happy that Jin sung is finally starting to grow as a character. Self realization is the first step to changing. I think she will just keep getting better. Jang hyuk is doing a great job portraying young oh. I can feel his dedication to the role. And this is definitely better than doctors. Each Monday I'm waiting for beautiful mind not doctors.

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Me too. I really liked her more episodes 5-6. Hopefully her character stays on this path and there is no regression.

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One point to add - LYO's father said he was the 205th child in the orphanage. And if you translate LYO's Hangul's name (이영오), it is literally 205. Imagine a father naming his child after a number! I feel so sad for LYO.

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Thank you for sharing this! It's stuff like this that builds up my hope that this is going to be a brilliantly written drama full of plot twists and nuanced complex characters.
Jang Hyuk wouldn't have signed on for anything less... right?
I really hope I won't be disappointed in the coming weeks!!

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The reveal that he was an adopted orphan adds a new twist to this father-son relationship, or perhaps Doctor-research subject relationship. His condition must have been fascinating for a neurologist. Was he adopted out of sympathy/love or as a challenge to explore? It is sad that his father doesn't see his condition as handicap to overcome but rather a terrible defect to hide.

I don't think Dr. Lee revealed anything about Young oh condition to the police when he gave Jin Sung the locker key. Only that they would find evidence. Dr Lee switched out the prescription drugs for vitamins. In the interrogation room, Young oh is surprised to hear what the vial contained and immediately suspected his father who was his prescribing Doctor.

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Aaaahh! Young oh (or 205 as Korean viewers have lovingly nicknamed him, 2 = I 0 = Young 5 = Oh) is breaking my heart.
I wasn't for romance at the start but someone please love this broken man who's constantly been told that he's faulty and imperfect, whose been ground under his father's hammer for so long.
Someone please hug him and tell him he isn't a monster :'(
I volunteer myself, if Jinsung isn't interested.

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Queue up behind me pls.. lol

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Queue up too pls. I'd hug LYO everyday.that eyes need lots of hugs

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I think his father is the root of many of his problems. Have seen ep6, and I suspect that is where a major turning point in the plot will be.

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Thank you! I came to say the same thing.

I don't think I can take one more person s#[email protected]%ing on Young Oh. It's starting to feeling like the Book of Job or something. Please no more cruelty to him.

Add me to the hug brigade.

And, Jang Hyuk is brilliant in this. Yeah there are plot holes, blah, blah, blah but he is killing it in making his emotionless character so wonderfully sympathetic.

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I'm really torn by this drama- I can't decide if the writing is BRILLIANT or a potential disaster.

I love the way that all the characters are so complex- I disagree that it was obvious that Manager Chae was the evil guy, because to be frank, everyone seems to have their own selfish agenda in this show- from YO's dad, to Director Kang, to Dr Kim... And people who I thought were benign like Min Jae (I actually was hoping she and YO could live happily ever after!), suddenly turn around and stab YO in the back.
I don't think you can write off YO's dad as just being overtly protecting and still trying to do what's best for YO because of the police reporting, the manipulative way he handles YO and his deep seated distrust for him. That's not love/concern. That's twisted. I don't understand why he even adopted YO in the first place when all he seems to want to do is to control him and keep him at home like his pet. Also, he definitely isn't totally in the dark about the shady research and I wouldn't be surprised if he is a co-conspirator. Maybe something to do with the watch he wears? Since we are assuming Manager Chae is the one who killed Dr Shim, then both YO's dad and him have the same watch. I think?

So my problem now is that I don't know if I'm seeing clues that I'm not meant to see, reading into stuff that isn't there, and I'm ultimately going to be disappointed when everything doesn't fall into place. Because lots of stuff confuses and fascinates me about every single character and how they fit into this mystery, but I'm wondering if the writer may have bit off more than she/he can chew.

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I would say both. The writing has been brilliant and layered for male lead character Young-oh, and a total disaster for Jin-sung, the female lead character. Of course, this is based on what's transpired in the few episodes that have aired so far. As we all know, opinions can and often do change over the course of a 16 episode drama.

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I think that Jin-Sung was intentionally written to be kind of an over-eager doofus.

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Agreed! I think there are some complicated female characters on the show, though most of them seem to have shady motives. It's hard to say anything without spoiling ep. 6 though.

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You took the words out of my mouth. I found myself marveling at how brilliant a character Young Oh is and then I realized the same writer created Jin Sung.

I concluded that Jang Hyuk must have added more to the character than what's written whereas rookies like Park So Dam can't.

At this moment, I am enjoying the drama but this is the type which can easily teeter into disaster zone. For a start, I don't see many antisocial symptoms in Young Oh. He cannot emote, empathize and read other's emotions but he didn't intend to hurt or kill anyone for sheer pleasure or personal gain.

Lee Young Oh does have the desire to be accepted and loved even though he doesn't know what love is. Honestly, I can't imagine how Jang Hyuk manages this role. It is so difficult. Just take the part where he was betrayed by Min Jae right in front of everyone. There's no obvious anger or pain, more like he was godsmacked. However, there was just this small giveaway that he had some indiscernible emotions running beneath.

I have no idea how the drama is going to handle the romance. I just hope they don't suddenly 'cure' Young Oh because of Jin Sun's healing love or something. I'd throw my chair at the screen.

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I am feeling the same way as you, Michykdrama. Will it be brilliant or profoundly disappointing? The psychiatry is all off for me right now. Children are not diagnosed with antisocial personality disorder (sociopathy in this case) but diagnosed with Conduct Disorder instead for the simple reason that the brain is still growing and can change, even if there has been trauma. There is also a difference between a lack of empathy and intentional cruelty - I haven't actually seen the latter from Young Oh yet. His behaviour is almost identical to my friend's son, who has Asperger's: low empathy (she had to use all those same expression cards with him as Young Oh's dad), destructive but not cruel tendencies with flashes of anger, loneliness, and brilliance (kid was reading and playing computer games at 3!).

BUT - I am kind of hoping that we'll find out Young Oh was subject to secret experimentation himself (heart lesions, brain lesions?) with his father the Dr. Frankenstein of the equation. And that his brain is repairing itself.

BECAUSE - otherwise, how do we get a love story? (I have just watched episode 6 BTW and there is no sign or hint of one yet, and honestly I don't see how there could be a love story when one character is - physically through brain trauma - incapable of love).

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I'm not surprised the psychiatry is a mess. Cannot think too much into the medical stuff either. Obviously they did do some research before writing the script but it's still super far removed from reality- (you cannot fake someone's death in hospital, and certainly not the way YO did it!)

But I think the best part about it is that it's so unpredictable and there aren't clear good or bad guys, everyone is shades of grey, which is more realistic and keeps us guessing and on our toes- everyone has a different theory as to what is going to happen!

So just close 2 eyes about the obvious psychiatry flaws like I'm doing for the medical ones, and enjoy Jang Hyuk's awesome performance. Haha. We will pray hard that we won't be disappointed!!

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To be fair, that "heart stop" fake death has been used before, in a US show or movie some years ago, probably where they got the idea.

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I think they also used that in Yong Pal.

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Medically speaking it's still absolute rubbish though, regardless how many times it may have been used! I've used that drug before and it does cause the heart to "pause" and it will look like a flat line on the heart monitor for a short while but it sure as hell wouldn't fool anyone into thinking that someone was permanently dead.
But yeah, no one is watching medical dramas for the actual medicine anyway ?

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I also think young oh was adopted for some kind of experiment. The father/son relationship is really interesting. I hope they'll go deeper on that.

But is young oh really incapable of feeling love? If he feels pain and sadness then why can't he love? I just don't get it. Is there really a sickness that makes you incapable of loving? From what I understand he never experienced any kind of love from family members or friends or girlfriends. So maybe he doesn't know what love is. But does that mean he can't love?

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I think he is capable of feeling love, just that he is not able to identify it in others.

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Thanks for the recap murasakimi. The man in black...curious, is there a reason Young-oh is always dressed in all black (shirt, tie, and pants) except for his doctor's lab coat? I've noticed his father, Dr. Lee, tends to be dressed in mostly black too.

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I noticed that too!

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But he actually wore a beige shirt in one of the posters with JS. Perhaps the change in the color of his clothes will signify his turning point later?

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Wouldn't that be cliche? Maybe the family tailor stocks only black :D

Jang Hyuk looks terrific in black and actually so does Dr Lee.

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I first didn't watch this drama since I rarely like medical drama, but LYO changed my mind and the plot is intriguing. Just love it when dramas plays with confusion of good and evil. Similar to Harvey or Joker in Batman and somehow they become so confuse and chose the dark side. I think this drama is about LYO and Suk Joo fighting that confusion my bet is on Suk Joo becoming evil.I was at edge of my seat watching this and the ending r just amazeballs, Made me screamed "what???" Why????. I love to hate Jin sung too, she shouldn't be a cop at all. Looking forward to her character growth and I hope she'll be the one who support LYO.

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I'm kinda happy that Jin Sung at least had a reason to arrest him and wasn't just running around like a headless chicken. Can I just say that I may be biased with how adorable she is? That scene in the deaf boy's house with her fixing the light and Young Oh catching is possibly my favourite in this episode. I think people give her too much flak for being young and naive. I think Young Oh was a little bemused that she apologized to him (and a little thrown), I don't know how many people apologise to him for misjudging him. I'm going to go with none so far. And judging by her general behavior, I think she might begin her 'think before you leap' arc soon.

Having seen episode 6, I can say that Jang Hyuk is amazing and deserves all the awards. Like seriously. Though I'm glad you pointed out that Young Oh's violent behaviour seems to be getting swept under the carpet a lot but the show isn't coding it as good either, so I have hopes it might address it in the future.

tl;dr I love Jin Sung and this drama is amazing and Jang Hyuk is frikkin' awesome

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I am so so hooked to this show .. The writing is flawed in a lot of places but the overall plot, the actors are making it work ..

Finally JS stops and reflects. And her character stops being annoying and starts making more sense.

How amazing was that scene with the lie detector ? it was chilly one minute and heart wrenching the next when he asks the police officer - can you feel my pain? My heart went out to him. You know that something is not right with you, everyone reinforces that, but there is nothing you can do to change it. How do you fight your own brain?

And the flashback of that birthday surprise. Poor boy. I just wanted to hug him.

I'm not sure why the ratings are so low. I wish more people were watching this - The comment section would have gone crazy trying to figure out YO

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That cliffhanger...man oh man, where to start? Didn't see that plot twist coming.

Thought about the 2 lines from the poem The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost:

Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.
I shall be telling this with a sigh

Oof, that scene of Kim Min-Jae battling sexism and elitism as she confronted her professor for omitting her name from the research thesis - bumping into a glass ceiling and being subverted from continuing to advance in the top of her field...I wanted so badly to see her storyline narrative as one of breaking through the glass ceiling towards a Professorship despite the backlash & roadblocks encountered because she graduated from a rural school instead of Seoul University. How rewarding it would have been to see Min-Jae accomplish this as a result of her perseverance, talent, ambition, and determination. Female empowerment, Lean In? Bummer, this is what I was hoping a Beautiful Mind would explore with Min-Jae's character after her earlier flashback scenes and the one in this episode with the professor.

If only the writer Kim Tae-Hee had chosen to actually explore this issue and others (a lack of quality mentoring and support from faculty, the double standard when it comes to ambition - how its often perceived as a negative quality in a woman when it would be positive in a man, etc.) by bringing it to the forefront over the course of this drama...Oh what could have been! A wasted opportunity to be the (kdramaland) exception and not the general rule for 'young' female lead characters like Jin-Sung (**cough cough).

In nearly every industry, from publishing to scientific research, women have had to forge their own paths against overwhelming odds and less-than-friendly welcomes...Proudly take credit for your ideas. Have confidence in the value of your contributions. And if the space you’re in doesn’t have room for your voice, don’t be afraid to carve out a space of your own. ~ HRC

Alas, apparently Min-Jae didn't get the memo: Nurture your abilities and self-confidence. Don’t let others sway you from pursuing your goals.

And why more times than not is it the norm for a rookie/a young working person to be written as incompetent and portrayed as a bumbling idiot constantly faltering and stumbling around still trying to learn the ropes on their first "real" job or "chosen" professional career?

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"And why more times than not is it the norm for a rookie/a young working person to be written as incompetent and portrayed as a bumbling idiot constantly faltering and stumbling around still trying to learn the ropes on their first “real” job or “chosen” professional career?"

That's a really relevant point and one that I don't see changing. :( And its more prevalent for the young female rookie who is obviously supposed to be less experienced and naive etc etc as compared to the obviously more talented and uber genius male lead. (who are both, technically, at the start at of their careers)

One day dramaland, one day.

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Since you brought up prejudice against females, I'll mention what I said about Doctors- I'm really appreciating that show for how being a female surgeon is a non-issue. Compare this to Beautiful Mind where there are NO female senior surgeons at all- all males, and they made Min Jae out to be such a pushover like you said.
So strong female leads who are treated as equal (or better) than their male counterparts does exist in kdramaland, just not in this drama.

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I was disappointed with minjae's choice too but for the interesting twist it puts in the game, I'm letting it slide. But I hope she realizes later on she didn't hv to choose this easy way up...and that it's much more rewarding to heal LYO than to use him...

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oh my goodness thank you for the recaps! i have been like waiting for days for it to come out!

I have seen both episode 5 and 6. I guess the killer is still mysterious to me.... like i said in my comment on episode 4 i thought it was his dad, but the hand that kinda-tried-killing doctor/researcher Shim had a younger hand!

I'm also happy for Jin-Sung for trying to get her thoughts on everything she had done from being so emotionally and just jumping to conclusions somehow.
Min-jae? nah i don't ship her and Young-Oh never did. in my opinion this episode kinda showed her true colors if ever.

I started to watch FATED TO LOVE YOU where Jang Hyuk was the main male lead, and when i compare his acting (aside from being soooooo GOOFY , SILLY & FUNNY Lee Gun)...his acting as Lee Young-Oh is a very serious character... i think he will be developing his true personality soon for this kdrama, like knowing to learn how to feel emotions, to be loved, learn to love and etc.
Though i still look at Young-Oh as a mixture of Dr. House (USA SERIES) and Sherlock (BBC Series Benededict Cumbebatch) XD

sorry for the long opinion XD

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Finallyyyyyy caught up with this show! I'm really liking the mystery. I didn't think Dr. Lee was the killer, but it wasn't obvious to me that Assistant Manager Chae was. Then again, I wasn't making a list of suspects.

Loving Jang Hyuk's acting. So glad to see him in a intense, mysterious drama this time. I've seen him in sageuks (<3), rom-coms, action dramas, and a movie (The Client). I feel like I might wanna rewatch The Client some time. See if I appreciate it more than the first time. Kinda getting a similar vibe from JH's roles.

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When I read comments like yours I feel better about not figuring out that dr chae was the killer.

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I didnt suspect him either until someone pointed it out in another discussion forum.

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Nope. Can't figure out the killer too. And now I'm reaaaaally confuse on who tried to kill whom and how they did that and the motives.

Firstly LYO suspects Dr Kim and from the way she's acting. I thought he was right. Then we have Dr Chae because he prescribed the meds for the motorcyclist.

And the recap says that Chief Director Shin is the primary doctor?

"Therefore, the primary physician of the two must be the same person, and that was none other than Chief Director Shin. This is precisely the reason Dr. Kim killed him."

Can someone help me with this?

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I'm really enjoying this drama because it makes you think. It is building a world filled with complex characters and explores different people's motivations. It is not one that is easy to predict or one that you can easily pigeonhole characters into archetypes. It plays with people’s prejudices and questions them. How do people’s prejudices hinder their empathy and understanding of others? People who actually have no known medical problems in reading emotions fail all the time to truly understanding others.

You have a hospital that is pretty much a neoliberalized institution that just cares about making more profit. Doctors get text messages of their work in relation to profit loss or gain. It also explores circumstances that constrain or even oppress people, from their personal ambitions, familial relationships, to even gender. Take Kim Min Jae’s situation for instance, she’s merely for plot device because her character allows us to see her personal experience at the hospital, no matter how hard she has worked because of her gender, class, and lack of connections due to her background, she was pressured to throw Lee Young Ho under the bus to keep her career. The next episode will explore her character and situation more. The show does not reveal everything at once. I want to say more but will stop here.

There is also the father and son relationship that we are starting to see more and more. What is really the father’s interest in Lee Young Ho. Does he really care about him even though it is a really perverse way of caring? Because he does actually save him. One can read that he wanted him out of that operation room to save Lee Young Ho from being further implicated with the murders and also try to save Lee Yong Ho from his own self, since the father believes that he is capable of such things. But is the father only interested in Lee Young Ho as an object of his medical research, is he just a creation for him that to his eyes that he failed in making completely human. And I think this is one of the bigger concerns of the show, what is human and what makes one human?

Also, I do not think Lee Young Ho’s condition was revealed to the police, all they found out was it was vitamins but it didn’t discuss what they were for. It was Kim Min Jae who exposed Lee young Ho’s condition at the end.

In regards, to Lee Young Ho’s violent reactions, it might be his defense mechanism when he feels he is being attacked, but it is curious that he always holds onto the neck and it makes me wonder if he is just checking the pulse too as a way to read the other person. I mean this is a character that basically has been living in isolation despite being surrounded by many people around him. He has always been told to hide himself. I’m not quite surprised with his violent reactions.

My only worry is that this show is trying to tackle a lot of different things but so far the acting is holding it together. Jang Hyuk's acting floored me especially in the...

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I agree with yr thoughts...in the same way private education has become solely profit making that it loses the genuine educating aspect...this drama brings the same scenario to another noble profession that should be more for healing than anything else. When money is more important...doctors tend to stop trying, so afraid of death statistics just as us efucators are made to fear failure statistics in education...I love this realistic take on it...will keep watching

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Beautiful mind so far has been a heavy show in the thinking department. It serves you a few mysteries at one time that sometimes I would break out. No one is really evil in this show, only those who tried their best to achieve their goals even if it means sacrificing others (How I see the characters). When people hate Jin Sung, I feel that I can accept her flaws, because that's just how she is. The pace this show gives is mesmerizing, it keeps you at the edge of your seat. I don't even realized my one hour watching this show because of how fun it is. Hoping more people will watch the show, trust me the show itself doesn't really trying too much to be a brilliant one.

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Jang Hyuk's acting in this amazing. I always knew he was good but I am even more impressed. I hope they keep the more menacing aspects of Young Ohin play and don't just make him all sympathetic now. I find YO most interesting when he's dark and dangerous, and I love seeing JH go there in his acting.

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I am in love with this show and it's mostly because of how intrigued I am by Jang Hyuk's Lee Young Oh. I saw Jang Hyuk in Fated to Love You and liked him in there but love him even more here. The undercurrent of emotions he displays every time he is betrayed or faces a roadblock just gets to me. I am there with him in the moment, feeling every bit of boiling rage and pain and disbelief. The other characters are intriguing as well but Young Oh takes the cake. I was initially frustrated with Jin Sung but she's slowly changing for the better in this week's episodes so hopefully I can manage to like her as well. Can't wait for next week.

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i noticed also that in the series everyone has his or her own agenda.... so i guess they will use any advantage they have in any current situation that will happen in the series

but really that director kang is so greedy to make profit eh? XD

rooting for more scenes of Young-Oh and Jin-Sung (since i kinda ship them so badly even if the genre of the drama has no word ROMANCE on it) XD

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According to the website http://www.psychiatrictimes.com/psychotic-affective-disorders/hidden-suffering-psychopath, Psychopaths do indeed suffer and have emotional connections. All this talk about Young Oh not having emotions is odd to me, since emotions aren't something that can be eradicated from humans (even one's with personality disorders). Young Oh isn't empathic--and empathy is a requirement for healthy deep relationships.

"Psychopaths can suffer emotional pain for a variety of reasons. As with anyone else, psychopaths have a deep wish to be loved and cared for. This desire remains frequently unfulfilled, however, because it is obviously not easy for another person to get close to someone with such repellent personality characteristics. Psychopaths are at least periodically aware of the effects of their behavior on others and can be genuinely saddened by their inability to control it. The lives of most psychopaths are devoid of a stable social network or warm, close bonds." -- from the article on the website above.

I don't view Young Oh as a psychopath. He cares and honors his goals (to keep people alive through perfect medical practice). In fact, on many levels, he's the most truthful person in the entire show. He seems genuinely bothered by his father's awful opinion of him ("Never show who you really are.") Those words from his father show who his father really is: a man who doesn't believe in his son. Young Oh is alone and has been all his life (even if the father took care of him, he still treated him like an experiment). Young Oh's whole sense of identity has come from his laser focus on medicine and his ability to read people. He's been successful as a student and doctor (up to now). He's able to read people and know when they are lying or being truthful through concrete visual cues rather than intuition and empathetic cues.

But he's not good at predicting betrayal (obviously). I don't like his father at all. It's almost like the father doesn't even see him as human.

Oh, and I agree with Doctordrama regarding the neck holding as a way of checking pulse. That was very perceptive. Also, I noticed when he did it in this episode, Jin-sung could still breath and speak clearly so he was not cutting off her airway, but more or less holding her still. Young Oh is singularly goal oriented and when he's focused on his goal, he's like a freight train. But that doesn't make him a psychopath.

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I think his father is not making Young Oh better. Like you said his father doesn't believe in him and constantly repeats that he is not normal and that he should hide his situation. His father definitely doesn't treat him like a human being. I believe that telling a child how stupid he is actually makes him stupid. So how can I imagine Young Oh's psychological impact since he lived with such a man? They can only be great.

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Agree

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I just watched episode 6
Very good drama
Main actor is excellent in acting this role
The young cute pretty police officer is now doing better
after very stupid action
She has learned from her mistakes but never covered the truth
The way they make them close together is very interesting

I really like this drama

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I'm on and off watching this on KBS World, and really liking how Jang Hyuk has been portraying Young-oh, he's selling the character so well. Also thought the quieter moment between Young-oh and Jin-sung in the house was a nice touch - I really hope Jin-sung can wise up a bit more and become Young-oh's ally. Min-jae's betrayal caught me by surprise, and it's a good cliffie to end on.

For some reason, I keep thinking Suk-joo might have an ulterior motive somewhere down the line...

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Minjae was such a bland character until her betrayal...and i hope sukjoo gets depth too...he is such a good character in need of some dimension because he gets so much screen time...i hope secondary leads get layers of characterisations...

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I'm rooting for the third love line between Young Oh and Shi Hyun. She looks like she will be able to handle crap from Young Oh. lol

Her comment was sassy enough.

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Man I love this drama... Didn't expect Young oh to be such a sympathetic character. ;__;

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I know currently EP 10 has released but iam gonna comment based on the episode iam currently watching and so far iam hating every single doctor in this series so far....they are all mean, selfish and have some or the other ulterior motive.....it's kinda scary to see them all so unprofessional and so engrossed in their own career and gossip that treating a patient can take second priority.
If this also happens in real life then its a very scary scenario, doctors are humans too i understand but they chose a profession where lives of other people are in their hands and they cannot do whatever they please with them at their whim.

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Our female lead has become the next female character in TV-land, after Inoue Orihime from Bleach, who made me feel like some chalk was squeaking beside me.

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