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Mystery Queen: Episode 3

A new case in her neighborhood catches Seol-ok’s attention, but it’s not as simple as the police seem to think, and she’s determined to prove it despite Wan-seung’s best efforts. As she shows him repeatedly that she’s not the meddlesome housewife he thinks she is, hope begins to emerge for a new crime-solving partnership. Has our Sherlock finally met her Watson?

 
EPISODE 3 RECAP

Once Wan-seung is gone, Seol-ok joins Joon-oh and his team at the crime scene they’re investigating, a burglarized home. Following the culprit’s footprints, she shows Joon-oh where he must have entered the house, gone up the stairs, and into the master bedroom. The room looks undisturbed to Joon-oh, but Seol-ok notices that the sheets have been changed, and there are sleeping pills on the bedside table; she also calls the design of the bedspread tacky.

A window above the bed is ajar, but it’s a two-story drop to the garden. She traces the footprints back downstairs to a middle schooler’s bedroom. Joon-oh tells her that no one was home at the time of the incident, and the thief was gone by the time the crime was discovered. Another room, belonging to the elderly grandparents, is clean and yields some jeweled rosaries, left untouched.

Wan-seung creeps back to the house and peers through the windows, gasping when he sees Seol-ok. Oblivious, Seol-ok asks Joon-oh what was stolen, and he tells her money and a bit of jewelry. Seol-ok says it’s strange that a burglar would take those but leave behind the expensive electronics and the jeweled rosaries, as well as a gold plaque in a glass case, worth at least three million won (about three thousand US dollars).

She tells Joon-oh that most thieves have a specialty, and they know exactly where to look to find the goods they plan to steal, whereas this intruder lacked focus and made a mess of the whole house. Joon-oh excitedly asks if it’s drugs again.

The strangest thing, she says, is that the culprit didn’t enter the bathroom as if knowing that there was nothing to steal, although all the doors in the house look identical. Even the footprints lead precisely to all the rooms. The culprit, she concludes, is someone intimately familiar with this house.

Wan-seung comes through the front door and sits down squarely on Seol-ok’s stack of eggs to glare at her as she announces that this house was the scene of something much worse than robbery: murder. Wan-seung laughs, and even Joon-oh smiles in disbelief.

Crime Scene Investigator Park asks her where the body is then; CSI Na confirms that she found no evidence of one in the house. Seol-ok says, “A person was killed in the master bedroom upstairs. And the body is—” Wan-seung yells, “Ajumma!” Seol-ok jumps and squeaks.

Looking furious, Wan-seung says that he knew something was up. He takes out his handcuffs and brandishes them at Seol-ok, reminding her of his promise to arrest her the next time she interfered in official business. Stunned, Seol-ok stares at him, and then at her poor crushed eggs. “Move!” she cries. He refuses, and she pushes him off her cart and onto the ground.

At the substation, Earnest Cop is sweeping the yard when Slacker Cop ambles up, scolding the younger man for raising dust when he just bathed—er, washed his hands after patrolling. They notice a student sitting outside the station, and Slacker Cop slips away inside to nap, leaving Earnest Cop to question the boy.

Meanwhile, Wan-seung accuses Seol-ok of committing terror against an officer of the law; she retorts that an officer of the law shouldn’t have sat on her innocent eggs. Wan-seung asks why on earth she and her eggs were even here, and Joon-oh says apologetically that he asked her to come and offer advice.

Wan-seung throws the eggy mess at him and yells at him to shape up—why is a police officer taking advice from a neighborhood ajumma? Seol-ok snaps that maybe it’s because she knows better than the police. He yells at her to stop watching so much TV, and she asks if he even went to police school. Both screaming at this point, he demands to know what university she went to, and she declares that she’s got a doctorate—what’s he gonna do about it? At this he shakes his finger at her, telling her that her book-learning won’t help catch any criminals.

They’re about to launch into another shouting match when CSI Park comes outside, berating them for contaminating the crime scene. The homeowner also arrives, asking what they think they’re doing. Wan-seung blames Seol-ok for the mess and apologizes to the homeowner, but he angrily tells them all to leave. Seol-ok urgently tells the man this isn’t a simple burglary, but that somebody died here. Wan-seung rubs his forehead in exasperation.

“Someone was killed? Then where’s the body?” asks the homeowner. Seol-ok perks up and asks why he mentioned murder when she only said someone died, but he irritably tells her to go away. She says that it’s a strange case and that they need to look into it more, but he tells her to get lost. At this, Seol-ok asks him bluntly why he’s stalling the investigation. He points to the mess with the eggs and tells her to leave before he files a report. Seol-ok tries to insist again that it was murder, but Wan-seung covers her mouth with a gooey hand and drags her off.

Wan-seung takes her to a clothing store and tells her to buy him a nice new jacket to replace the one she ruined, warning her that he grew up rich. She scoffs at him, but loses her smirk when she sees the bandage on his arm. She tells him seriously that she’ll buy him a jacket, on one condition.

Cut to Seol-ok peering at him through a pharmacy window as he grumpily buys a fresh bandage and puts it on his arm. She hands him the new jacket and thanks him for saving her life that day. He puts it on, saying he’s glad she knows before turning to leave, but she pulls his collar from behind, saying they’re not even yet.

Dong-ki calls to let Wan-seung know that he’s delivered Jang Do-jang to the prison. Wan-seung tells him not to let down his guard until the man is locked up, and then gets back to Seol-ok’s last task for him: buying her one hundred and fifty eggs at the neighborhood convenience store, which doubles as a small grocery. Wan-seung is grumbling about pampered prosecutors’ wives (she told him she needs the eggs for a full-body massage) when he gets a call from the substation.

Seol-ok excitedly comes over to him once he’s done, having deduced that the mom in the burglary case is missing, and that the son reported it. Wan-seung laughs, then asks her sharply how she knew all that—was she just chatting with Joon-oh?

Seol-ok points out that Wan-seung just gave her the information and plays back his conversation, which she recorded on her phone. He’s outraged, but she says the two of them were talking when he got the call, and she’s legally allowed to record a conversation she’s part of.

Wan-seung asks how Seol-ok knew it was the mom who went missing, and Seol-ok points out that the dad just threw them off his property. Wan-seung says her deductions aren’t so impressive after all, and Seol-ok retorts that he failed to make them.

They take the eggs to the register with Seol-ok saying that Wan-seung must investigate the house again; no crime can be completely erased. The store owner (the mother of the bullied son from the first episode) tells Wan-seung to turn himself in, whatever his crime, because he can’t fool Seol-ok. Heh.

Wan-seung tells Seol-ok that there’s nothing sinister about this—the woman simply left home. When it’s time to pay, the owner gives them a price, then raises it when she realizes that Wan-seung is paying. He pays grumpily, asking if they only give discounts to people with graduate degrees (Seol-ok hides her giggles). Before he leaves, Seol-ok asks if she can meet the kid, and Wan-seung leans close and whispers, “Not a chance.”

Wan-seung stops his car next to Seol-ok as he leaves and warns her not to come near the substation, or he’ll arrest her. She says she only wants to help, but he dismisses the idea and tells her to go home and make dinner. She tells him not to change his mind later, and he holds up his handcuffs at her before speeding off.

In front of the house where the crime happened, an old man scrubs the back seat of a car, then fiddles with a picture hanging above the dash of the missing woman and her son. The old man sees Seol-ok peeking in the window and gets out to ask her what she’s doing. She notices that the cloth he was using to clean it has dark red stains on it before he hides it behind his back. She asks if he lives in this house, and when he says yes, she says she’s relieved that he didn’t park illegally.

At home, as they pickle eggs, Seol-ok rants to Kyung-mi that the case will end up unsolved because the police won’t find the nonexistent burglar, and the murderer will get away. Kyung-mi complains about helping Seol-ok cook for her mother-in-law and reminds Seol-ok to watch her shop on Friday in exchange so that she can visit her son. She won’t get to see him for long this time; his grandmother has told him that Kyung-mi exchanged him for the money to set up her shop.

Kyung-suk arrives home and asks them why they’re pickling so many eggs and is incredulous when Seol-ok reminds her that she asked for them. Kyung-suk tells her she only wanted about five eggs, asking if Seol-ok has early dementia before floating off. The two friends stare after her, agape, and then Seol-ok asks if they should put the remaining eggs in the tub for a massage. “With your mother-in-law,” says Kyung-mi in a deadpan. “Do it.”

Later, Seol-ok calls Joon-oh and pleads for a phone interview with the boy, but Wan-seung tells Joon-oh to cut off contact with Seol-ok, or he’ll bite him. Seol-ok reminds Joon-oh that he’s the chief of the substation, and that the two men are both lieutenants, even if Wan-seung is his sunbae—as the highest ranked police officer at the station, he has nothing to fear.

Determined, Joon-oh goes back and places his phone face-down on the table where they’re interviewing the boy, CHA HEE-CHUL. Hee-chul says that he thinks his mom went to die, and when Wan-seung asks where she might be, he replies that he’d have found her if he knew. Listening in, Seol-ok sighs that he’s lost the chance to create a rapport with the boy, and true to her prediction, Hee-chul clams up.

Joon-oh goes outside to talk to Seol-ok, who asks again to come, but Joon-oh tells her that Wan-seung will kill him. So he goes back in with a bluetooth headset this time, strategically placed on the ear not facing Wan-seung. Hahahaha.

Wan-seung begins to lose his temper with Hee-chul. When the boy gets up to leave, Joon-oh asks him if his parents fight a lot, repeating Seol-ok’s words in his ear. Hee-chul says that he doesn’t trust the police. Seol-ok-as-Joon-oh lists the signs of physical conflict in the house, and asks if his father gets violent sometimes. Joon-oh asks if Dad often sleeps in Hee-chul’s room (based on the men’s cologne and clothing Seol-ok noticed there), and if that’s why Hee-chul thinks his mom planned to commit suicide. Hee-chul says that he saw sleeping pills in his mom’s room.

Wan-seung watches suspiciously from a station window as Joon-oh calls Seol-ok from his car. She tells Joon-oh that it wasn’t pills that killed the mom and tells him about the smudged blood on the master bedroom’s windowsill. An eavesdropping Wan-seung suddenly grabs the phone and yells into it, startling Seol-ok, who hangs up on hearing his newest threat to arrest her.

Wan-seung goes to headquarters to pick up the forensics report, stopping on his way to visit Kwang-tae and fill him in on recent events. Upon hearing that Seol-ok is Prosecutor Kim Ho-chul’s wife, Kwang-tae urges Wan-seung to arrest her for interfering with their investigation, but Wan-seung says she’s not at fault for her husband’s wrongdoings. Kwang-tae points out that Ho-chul is single—or is he pretending to be single? Wan-seung looks concerned for a moment, then dismisses it as none of his business.

Wan-seung goes to the forensics department next, where CSI Park tells him about the footprints at the crime scene. He also did a luminol test on “Teacher Yoo’s” recommendation; Wan-seung rolls his eyes and apologizes for the unnecessary work, but CSI Park says they found a small bloodstain on the windowsill. They don’t have DNA test results back, but the rare blood type is a match for LEE MYUNG-HEE, Hee-chul’s mother.

Wan-seung remembers Seol-ok saying they might be able to get prints from the bloodstain, and CSI Park confirms that they got a faint partial. Wan-seung reflects in disbelief that Seol-ok got everything right.

Well into her drinks at Kyung-mi’s shop, Seol-ok tells her friend that she’s the only one who appreciates her; she only wanted to help, but Wan-seung told her that an ajumma like her should just go home and cook dinner. “But I can’t even cook,” she cries as she eats the terrible-tasting lotus root she made.

Seol-ok says that she should have gone to university instead of getting married—maybe she’d get more respect then. Kyung-mi asks Seol-ok why she even bothers trying to help the police when they’re so ungrateful and tells her not to waste her time on them. Seol-ok says that Kyung-mi knows why.

“Back then and now, I’ve always been useless,” Seol-ok says mournfully. Kyung-mi scolds her for saying that, but Seol-ok says that she’s going to come back to reality—she’s just an unskilled housewife with a high school diploma, and she has to accept her limitations.

Arriving back at the substation, Wan-seung wonders to himself if Seol-ok is a psychic; or maybe it’s because she has a Ph.D? Lol. He asks Joon-oh about Seol-ok, who panics and swears he wasn’t on the phone with her. Wan-seung calls Joon-oh timid for taking his order so seriously and phones Seol-ok himself, but she doesn’t pick up. He asks Joon-oh where she lives, but he just assures Wan-seung that she’s stopped interfering in cases.

Wan-seung goes to the convenience store and follows the owner around, pestering her for the extra money she charged him for Seol-ok’s eggs. He threatens to report her for discrimination until she gives him the five thousand won (about five dollars) as well as Seol-ok’s work address.

Wan-seung arrives at Kyung-mi’s store and peers in the window, but it’s closed and empty. He calls her again (she has his number saved as “Idiot”), but she ignores his call, telling Kyung-mi who it is while warming her not to answer. Hearing the outer door open, the two friends go to the counter and find Wan-seung standing there. (Did he break in?)

She tells him to leave her alone now since she won’t bother him anymore, but he walks past her and into the back. Seol-ok asks how he found out she was here, worried that he went to her house, but he says he asked the owner of the convenience store. Kyung-mi, who is drunker than Seol-ok by now, slurs that he’s not a complete idiot before telling him that she went to Seoul University, so he’d better not look down on her friend. He nods, agreeing that of course the doctor’s friend would be a Seoul alum. Ha.

Seol-ok asks why he came and tells him to leave, assuring him again that she won’t interfere, but he says that she won’t live long forcing herself to ignore what she cares about—it’s okay to interfere sometimes. She stares at him in shock. He finds the door to her secret room and goes in despite her protests, marveling at her shelves of books on criminology and profiling as well as her files full of newspaper clippings about old cases.

He asks her what she majored in, and her vague answers leave him with the impression that she got her Ph.D in criminal psychology. He finds a photo album full of wanted posters, and she tells him her phone is full of them too, in case she ever runs into a suspect—although she hasn’t yet.

He moves on to a bulletin board covered in photos of violent crime victims, all of them young and female. Wan-seung eyes her oddly, asking if she gets excited when she looks at these kind of pictures. She says that she does—it makes her angry on behalf of the victims, and outraged that the people who did these things are still walking around on the streets. Isn’t that the reason he became a detective? She points to each girl, telling him about her life and how she was killed, vowing to catch their murderers.

Wan-seung looks away from her, looking disturbed, and tells her that she has too much time on her hands. Seeing the spreadsheet of MOs she made, he says the police have those already. She asks him if he expects her to hack into their system; she admits she’d love to, but it took her six months to learn how to use the spreadsheet program.

He finally asks her if she knows who Lee Myung-hee’s murderer is. It’s the burglar, she tells him mockingly. Wan-seung bashes his head against her investigation board.

They end up back at the victim’s house, where she shows him tire tracks in the yard and tells him to look for petals on the tires of the old man’s car, which is parked in the street. He finds them, and then matches them to the flowers in the garden at her request, grumbling the whole time. She tells him this proves the car went into the yard the day of the burglary and left tracks because of a recent rainfall.

Strangely, however, there’s only one set of tire tracks, as if the car exited the yard but didn’t enter—which means the other tracks were erased deliberately. Wan-seung realizes that this means the car was used to transport the body, and asks why the murderer didn’t just carry it to the car. “Because they didn’t have the strength. They’re old,” says Seol-ok. Besides, the prints in the blood were faint, like an old person’s.

They used dirt to cover the tracks, which explains the dry dirt in the wheelbarrow Seol-ok noticed when she first arrived at the crime scene, even though the yard was wet. And she knows they wrapped the body in the bedcovers because the ones on the bed were tacky, unlike Lee Myung-hee’s stylish and modern furniture and clothing. Wan-seung shares that he’s very fashionable too; he even matches his underwear to every outfit.

Seol-ok tells him he’ll find Lee Myung-hee’s blood in the backseat of the car, as they wouldn’t have put her in the trunk, which leads Wan-seung to deduce that it was a family member. Seol-ok is about to reveal the culprit’s identity when Kyung-suk calls Seol-ok, telling her to hurry home.

Seol-ok tries to dart off, but Wan-seung grabs her, demanding that she at least tell him who the culprit is. He asks if the in-laws did it, and she stares at him. “But why do you think they reported it as a burglary?” she asks him. From a window above, the old man watches them.

 
COMMENTS

Sherlock and Watson, working as a team! It was satisfying to see Wan-seung finally acknowledge that Seol-ok was right about everything, when he’s spent the entirety of their acquaintance dismissing her ideas and yelling at her to go home and make dinner. He has a streak of smug misogyny in him that makes him infuriating at times, but he also has a refreshing doggedness (hur) in pursuing his goals and a matter-of-fact charm that goes a long way in smoothing his character’s rough edges (a lot of which is down to Kwon Sang-woo’s charisma). I also appreciate that his bark seems to be a lot worse than his bite, which is evident from him giving Seol-ok endless “final” warnings without any real consequence, and the way he pays attention to every word she says, even when he’s annoyed by her. He refuses to take the opportunity to arrest her on some pretext at Kwang-tae’s suggestion too, despite their apparent enmity toward her husband. I just hope he learns some manners and humility in the near future.

Still, the star of the show is our Mystery Queen Seol-ok, and I find myself loving her more with each episode. The way she lights up when she discovers each new clue, her refusal to be intimidated by Wan-seung’s threats and badgering, even the way she solemnly announces her conclusions—her personality traits are unique and charming, and it’s so enjoyable to see the world through her eyes. I also like the way we’re given so much information about her life without it being spelled out directly.

Her relationship with her so-far absent husband, for example, is clearly unhappy, or at the very least dysfunctional; they seem to lead separate lives, and she’s obviously sacrificed her dreams for him and his family, and received little in return. She says she’s happy, but her regrets spill out in her more vulnerable moments. It must be stifling for someone with such a voracious intellect to be relegated to a domestic life she’s unsuited for, subject to the whims of her capricious mother-in-law. (Speaking of which, I enjoy the way the show uses Seol-ok’s situation and those of the characters in her small neighborhood to make a subtle commentary about the way society at large treats married and divorced women.)

Our heroine’s covert investigative missions do provide comedic fodder, but I hope that she can find the courage soon to honestly tell her mother-in-law about them, especially now that Wan-seung has accepted her as an unofficial consultant. (She’s going to have to confess to him about her fake doctorate at some point too, although I find endless amusement in that misunderstanding, and I’m in no hurry for it to be resolved.) Seol-ok has spent so long putting the needs of others before her own that she seems to do it automatically now; I wonder how much of that is the sense of inferiority she revealed when she was drunk, and how much is just done out of the desire to keep things peaceful at home. She doesn’t lack courage in other areas of her life, which is fortunate, since she’ll likely have a battle on her hands if she decides to finally pursue her dreams.

I’m very curious about Ho-chul, and I find it interesting that we’ve learned about him exclusively from other people so far. We’ve seen only Seol-ok’s perspective, so we have no idea what their dynamic is like and what he feels towards her; there’s also a distinct possibility that he’s not exactly a morally upstanding prosecutor judging from Wan-seung’s opinion of him, which could set up an interesting conflict down the line. Seol-ok facing off against her corrupt husband would give a personal dimension to her quest for justice, although I have a feeling that it’s already more than academic. Given the way she specifically collects information about young female murder victims, I wouldn’t be surprised if a tragedy in Seol-ok’s past was the catalyst for her career as an amateur detective. I’ll continue to gather clues until the show decides to reveal its secrets.

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Me when he sat on the eggs : ????
I absolutely love that Seol Ok has pictures of killers on her phone it makes me love her even more. And that yellow raincoat is too cute. Also did someone she know get killed? And did that shape her into the person she is today

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Me when he is going to suffer the consequences of sitting on the eggs: :D :D :D :D

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@peter did you see this ep?

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Ep1.. meh
Ep2.. *sigh*
Ep3.. Oohh
Ep4.. She's funny~~~ She might be a boring ahjumma but she's a methodical person and it's interesting to watch her with her so called investigation.

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LOL yeah it's definitely getting better. Just gonna scrub memories of the first 2 eps from my mind :P

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I quite enjoyed the first 4 episodes, save for the random talking to the drug trafficker at the end of episode 1. I love how she takes us through the steps of her thought processes and comes to the conclusions that she has about each case. It's very exciting.

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Ok I admit that I started to like choi Kang Hee, I never liked her before but she's rocking this role. The case in this episode is interesting.

On a side note her mother in law flashy skirt reminds me of barbie outfits.

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It took me 4 days to get thru episode 2 of Chicago Typewriter, but I got thru this one in one sitting. Hmmm... that must mean *something*.

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Same here!! I haven't even gotten through the first episode of Chicago Typewriter but this show is such an easy watch

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CT is boring honestly. It's kind of all over the place. On a side note never really noticed that food trolley on the poster. Now it totally makes sense lol.

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I'm the reverse, and actually thought about that while reading this recap: I am absolutely giddy at the thought of new CT, but this one just leaves me cold.

Choi Kang Hee is like an emoji come to life, in a way that doesn't work for me at all - I feel like I'm watching a kid's show with the over-emoting. Seol Ok's relationship with her family is one that sets my teeth on edge.

But that is exactly what made me think that viewing audiences might totally diverge on these shows. I wonder if there's anyone who really likes both?

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Me too. Chicago's a little different maybe? Or just a little heavier compared to this? ?
Anyways, I just wished to proclaim my love for this show! Love!

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The case of the dialogue and pacing dragging in a big circle.

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So much fun and keeping me on the edge of my seat! Loving this SO far! Thanks for the recap!

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This show is amazing! I love all of the timely comedic moments with some legit LOLs and the speedy pace of the show. I'm just impatiently waiting to learn more about Seol Ok's married life because the chemistry between her and Wan-seung is off the charts and I want them together (even though its only ep. 3 lol).

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Yup! Their chemistry is certainly good. If only she were not married.

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I'm also loving her character more and more!

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I love their chemistry too. They react so naturally off each other it doesn't look scripted. I like CKH in this role. It is more interesting than other roles that she has taken.

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Very interesting… Seul-ok's prosecutor husband is hated by the cops and is playing single. Is it wrong of me to hope that he gets put away for some misdemeanor of some kind and has to spend time in the pokey with the bad guy drug dealer? I mean what kind of jerk lets his wife put him and his sister thru school and baby sit mom and she is as cute as Seul-ok?

I enjoyed the way the mini-mart owner defended her and overcharged him, but I loved the fact that she keeps calling Seul-ok 'young miss' no matter now much Wan-seung protests that she's an ahjumma - that woman has eyes - we can all see that Choi Kang-hee is far to cute to be an ahjumma!

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She is like a caretaker of the house. Handling mother-in-law and sister-in-law. Husband got the best deal here. He can enjoy as much he wants outside and then not to worry about home. If in trouble then ask for wife's help.

She knows how to play the innocence. She is a Cute Ahjumma taking care of 3 people at home.

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I have serious doubts about her husband. I would like a little more backstory on why she ever accepted such a one-sided marriage. Was she star-struck by the "prosecutor" title, or?

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I think before marriage he's not yet becoming prosecutor, maybe a law student. Maybe the husband wants to pursue his studies and career and asks Seol Ok to be understanding, taking care his mother and sister. It reminds me of Twenty Again when Ha No Ra's husband doesn't want her to pursue her studies because they married young and wants her to focus on the family.

I think given how sexist and patriarchal Korean society is, it's not a stretch to imagine her husband only wants her to be housewife to take care of the family.

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That makes sense. I wonder how many dreams have ended up in the dustbin because of family/marriage pressures in real life Korea...

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The mini mart owner is gold! She is so respectful of SO, whereas WS is not, and is so rude to boot. She is quite similar to Officer Hong in that sense, having witnessed her prowess. Officer Hong, though naive and silly, is so cute, always deferring to her for help, calling her respectful terms. He is just like a little puppy.

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I'm really annoyed by how the word "misogyny" means so little to people these days. Him being an asshole to her (which is on purpose btw) has nothing to do with an inherit hate for the female sex (which is what the word means since you obviusly have no clue). And really would you trust someone who has no expertise in a job that you have been doing fo 10+ years to tell you how to do your job? We know she's amazing at being a detective because we are the audience, you need to remember the fact that just because the audience is aware of something doesn't mean the other characters are aware as well. I don't know about you but I wouldn't let just anyone think they can do my job better than I can unless they can prove themselves to me.

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Misogynist? Yeah, you're right, that doesn't really fit the bill. I haven't put much thought in it, but at "most" he'd be a bit sexist (which is extremely common in kdramas), although that doesn't seem to be the case either. There's definitely no hate going on here, just belittling of her, which yes, is kind of warranted considering how she puts herself, a civilian, in danger and interferes with police work. Of course he doesn't think a housewife knows better than the police who are actually educated in these things, because 99% of the time, that wouldn't be the case. All he knows is that she's a silly person who went up and talked to a criminal they were trying to catch (because that is just the most incredibly stupid thing I've seen in a kdrama ever and that says a lot, so yes, she's silly), almost getting herself stabbed in the process and him actually getting knifed. So I think he's got every reason to tell her off.

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Show is fun but also ridiculous. Seol-Ok shines and so does Mother in law but rest of it is just a big meh. There should be a limit to illogical events but nope here except there Heroine everyone else is dumb.

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Yes, I would prefer if WS or Officer Hong has the smarts to compete with her. WS seems to have all the brawn but not so much of a brain when it comes to detective work or deduction. The manner in which he depends on SO for the identity of the killer is so... even if she manages to get all the clues right.

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exactly, he was smart when he solved the drug case but in this case he needs SO to solve it it's kind of ridiculous, he's an experienced detective how can he bacome stupid suddenly, and as i see it he's not the one who solved this case.

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I find this is a common thing in dramas. When they promote or tell us one of the main leads is a genius or really good at something, they tend to sideline the other main leads to put the genius main lead in the center. Happened in I Remember You/ Hello Monster. I wish writers balance out the main leads' capabilities better. Both main leads, SO and WS, are competent and one or the other do not need rely on someone 100% to solve crimes. WS has his own abilities and I am hoping the show depict that better for later episodes.

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I have mixed feelings about the show (well, I do with most k-dramas these days).

She is obviously pretty smart, yet for some unknown reason chooses to be a total slave to her MIL, and her husband seems to be a husband in name only (and I am sure there is something going on with him, but not many clues yet). I find it totally annoying that she just drops everything whenever the MIL calls. I am hoping that she soon grows a spine to equal her smarts soon.

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Even though I am not Korean, this behavior is actually pretty normal in many Asian cultures. I don't know which country you are from, but I can understand how this is confusing from a Western perspective. Actually, I think this drama has one of the most realistic takes on the daily lives of aujummas. The mother-in-law is super realistic (seen literal examples like her). I am actually really glad that the show is dealing with these issues in a matter-of-fact way instead of melodramally while also showing the inherent problems of patriarchy in a modern environment

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While true, Korea is right at the top of the patriarchy pyramid, and has been for some time. Japan and Taiwan are much less so. China .. is an issue of it's own. I never ran into any such issues with my Japanese wife.

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To be fair, SO respects MIL as an elder, so she is always dropping everything the moment she calls. After all, her entire life doesn't revolve around solving cases. I like how she puts her MIL at first priority now, although it might seem a tad spineless. Only because she is a DIL first, and an amateur investigator second. However, I am sure the priorities will slowly change over the course of time.

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What bothers me is the fact that the MIL seems to have zero respect for her. But perhaps that is more common than it seems on the surface.

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You are right, and I am sad to say that this does happen to DIL a lot in real life (especially the ones who do not work). Once they are married, they are often not seen as an individual. Usually the main culprit is the MIL. Or, another way to put it, in some very tradition mindsets it is the DIL's primary duty to do everything for her husband and family first. The idea was that DILs would get respected for an extreme level of devotion. However, sadly, I think this often did not happen. Especially in modern patriarchal society, married women can be looked down for not working (a.k.a that aujummas have no skills outside the home) AND for working (neglecting the home, being too independent, etc.). I guess it is the definition of patriarchy that women cannot win. Wow...that sounds super depressing, but I hope I answered some questions?

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I really like the heroine. Seol Ok is a refreshing character. Love her enthusiasm and determination towards solving mysteries and finding the whole truth. It was good to see Wan Seung actually talking to Seol Ok about the crime in the end. This drama is a pleasant, easy watch. Not scary or boring.

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I so want to love this show. I really do. Yet I almost couldn't finish ep 3 and had to do it in two sittings. For some reason this just isn't working for me, just another case of a show being just right on paper, but still not bringing me in. I'm sad to say, I'm officially dropping it...

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Watching this drama, reminds me of my favorite childhood series, Detective Conan! ha ha! I like it! I hope Seol Ok and Wan Seung can get along well in solving the case as soon as possible! Somewhat uncomfortable see Wan Seung being "rude" and yelling towards Seol Ok. Would be awesome to see them work together to learn and complement each other. And please, character development for three officers at the substation. That ajusshi just go to the sauna only. huh! And more bromance like what wanseung and one of police officers that assigned in the headquarters! karaoke scene in the second episode is very funny!

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It's kind of comedy+mystery show and yeah it indeed reminds me of Detective Conan. Every case is not mind-bendingly hard, especially if you have watched numerous detective shows/movies, but still interesting to follow. If you see ep 4 there's some character development for the substation officers, not the ahjussi, but the younger one. I think with Seol Ok onboard, Wan Seung+Officer Hong, they'll be one heck of a team!

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I've been watching episodes 4 and finally that younger officer did something! and surprisingly the chemistry between them was nice. Yeah the case was similar to series or novels about detective. Not too heavy but still interesting to follow plus Choi Kang Hee was perfect for this role. I hope they became a solid team, each of them has interesting role in solving the case, such as story in Alfred Hitchcock and the three investigators, detective novels that I read. One acts as the "brain", one deals in physical and another conducts the research, if I'm not mistaken.

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so true... for all its expectations, chicago failed to wow me..

but this one is such an unexpected easy watch

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I'm the opposite of people on here. Chicago Typewriter has pulled me out from my drama slump. I really wanted to get into this show but .. I couldn't finish ep. 3 and dropping it. It feels like a weekend drama due to the style and pacing.

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Me too! I want to like this show, but every time Seol Ok jumps to instantly obey her mother in law it makes me want to scream in frustration. I get that there's a big cultural gap here between Korea and the US, and also that we're likely getting a not-so-typical stereotype (like a US show with a housewife who's constantly running the house and picking up kids from school and doing laundry) but come ON.

I don't even mind that she puts family first. What gets me is that she appears to be on the hook for instantly responding to any call or whim, and that she's monitored, that her MIL can veto her leaving the house. Unbelievably, I find the show about revolutionary ghosts less stressful than this one.

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I live the chemistry between our "Sherlock" and "Watson!" I watch the show more for their interaction than for the actual cases. I also can't wait about how the writer will handle character development throughout the series.

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Thanks Laica! Oh gosh, the argument between Seol Ok and Wan Seung with sticky eggs down his pants bottom and legs was just great! ? The kind of 'interaction' I was hoping for. ?

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Oh yuck! He covered her mouth with his eggy hand(s) and hauled her away with the same!!! ? ?

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Yes, that's so gross. I was surprised that his hand was covered with raw eggs because I only noticed his egg-covered pants. I am surprised CKH didn't flinch at the yucky hand covering her mouth, messing up her face in the process.

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i feel like the cases are taking to long to solve themselves :(

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unexceptedly, this case takes more than two episodes to solve. I don't mind it. I didn't fell bored and I like every details of it. But i understand, if others feel like the case drags too long. Knetz hope the case moves faster too. I think, we must wait until seol ok and wan seung get along well and seol ok can deal with her husband's family.

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I watched episode 4 and i am surprised that this case will drag to the next episode, it's not good to take this much time to solve one case.

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I didn't think it is too long. I am invested in the show enough to watch how each case plays out. However, I wonder how SO manages to sneak out for long hours each time with flimsy excuses without her MIL suspecting something is up. Her MIL only calls her and questions her why she is taking so long, but doesn't really suspect anything out of the contrary, unlike her friends, who are so quick on the uptake that SO is up to no good.

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Those lousy friends of the MIL are up to no good. Just trying to ensure enmity between MIL and Seol Ok for no other reason than that they are bored. MIL on her own is lazy and demanding, but not the scheming type. Her daughter, though,? is another story.

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It doesn't look like SO's SIL is the evil, scheming type either to me, though just as her MIL is just the lazy, non-scheming type. The SIL is an opportunist taking advantage of SO's predicament, at most, hopefully. [email protected] GB, It's been a while since I last read you in these part of the net, GB. Hope you've been well. :-)

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Hi patinalee! So nice reading you! ? ... Thanks for your nice note. Yes, I was very tied up and realised I needed to ease up on dramas and all things related to them, which meant (sob!) DB as well. I'm still juggling too many things, but I decided to try live-watching just a few dramas and of course to be more on our fun new DB to play and relax in while the shows are airing. ... Well, until more RL takes over again I guess. ? How about yourself? I hope you've been fine tool! ? ?

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I like this, I've always loved mystery genre shows. And Sherlock-watson style shows are my favourite. This is going to be so awesome!!

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That's the way I feel too, and the best part is that this is one of the most begrudging Watsons ever, so it's going to be so satisfying seeing him taken down several pegs and depending on her more and more. Looking forward to more scenes between Sherlock and Watson!

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Exactly! You spoke my mind. I'm looking forward to it too.

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Really liking Choi Kang-hee in this role. She can do quirky. ....... Already one red flag has appeared upon one of the police officers wondering outloud if her prosecutor husband has "only been pretending to be married." ....... While so far, Seol-ok's sister-in-law doesn't seem like the full-blown scheming type, she is most definitely taking advantage of Seol-ok for personal, monetary gain and this is truly unfortunate. Granted, Seol-ok knows this, but it doesn't make it any less sad.

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I spent this day watching all 4 episodes. Since i'm a big fan of detective conan, surely this drama is my cup of tea. I don't need pretty lady or handsome cop, just give me them and those cases. I love that ahjumma, reminds me of poirot and conan, i love her how she found courage in the end of episode 4 that she won't come home, way to go ahjumma

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This episode feels better paced and the main relationship appears to be developing well. The editing is cleaner and the "backflash" scenes are shorter and more easily followed.

Seol Ok's crime solving skill and her personality while she is crime solving is coming into better focus and it is nice to see that she appears to be a blend of Sherlock Holmes (modern incarnation) and Jessica Fletcher. The Wan Seung character is still wandering between "dumb and stubborn" and "smart and tough".

Personally, the weakest part of the show remains the family dynamic of Seol Ok on two fronts. These interactions don't appear to serve the main plot lines and it also waters down the Seol Ok character. As a device to introduce the larger story arc, if used that way, it tends towards melodrama and likely brings superfluous emotional tension in typical "trope"y kinds of ways rather than serving a tauter focus on comedic-crime duo. I can see how filling up 15 hours of drama with smartly written dialogue, twisty crime mysteries and truly insightful solutions will be a HUGE ask but remain somewhat hopeful that most of the makjang is dealt with quickly.

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better to watch

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rather than sherlock, i'm getting more miss marple vibes here.

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I have watched up to episode 4, so will keep that episodes commentary for the next recap. I really like CKH in this role, these roles really do suit her better than her last year long running MBC drama.

The police stories probably should not take a too serious bend as the policemen are from the patrol division and our resident Sherlock is a civilian after all. I do hope for a nice ending whereby Seolok is able to maybe join the police academy or sit for the examination if she has not exceeded the age limit, assuming there is one.

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Hate to say this, cuz I love Kwon Sang Woo, but, this series is boring the bah-jeezus out of me. I can tell the actors are trying to make the story and their characters interesting. However, for me this is just a big yawn. I only made it half way through ep 2 and had to admit....I don't like this one. THE END

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