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I’ll Find You on a Beautiful Day: Episode 1

Park Min-young retreats to her hometown in the picturesque countryside after questioning her career path in JTBC’s “healing” slice-of-life drama I’ll Find You on a Beautiful Day. The opening episode doesn’t give us much in terms of plot, but it sets the scene by introducing us to our beautiful locale and some of its residents, including bookshop-owner Seo Kang-joon. As a quiet, understated drama that relies on atmosphere perhaps more than plot, it might not be for everyone. But if, like me, you came here mainly for the relaxing setting of an independent bookshop in a scenic town, grab a hot beverage of your choice and settle in.

 
EPISODE 1: Wind Blowing Through a Willow Tree

In the peaceful countryside, IM EUN-SEOB (Seo Kang-joon) brews coffee at Goodnight Bookshop. Meanwhile, MOK HAE-WON (Park Min-young) walks along a scenic road, dragging a suitcase. She ignores a call from “the Director.” When she gets to Goodnight Bookshop, she peers through the windows, but nobody is in.

Across the way, while a little boy tries to get his attention, Eun-seob stares at Hae-won as she makes her way to Hodu House. She calls out to her aunt once inside, but the house is empty. Hae-won arduously lugs her suitcase up the stairs to her room.

As she takes in the view from her window, a yapping dog alerts her to her aunt’s arrival. It seems she wasn’t expected as SHIM MYUNG-YEO (Moon Jung-hee) wonders what she’s doing here. Is she taking time off? Myung-yeo is by no means the warm, fuzzy type, but their relationship appears comfortable.

Hae-won smiles to see her younger self in the background of a picture on a shelf in the kitchen. But she’s miffed when Myung-yeo looks at it in surprise, never having noticed her niece in the picture. Ha. Myung-yeo asks again if she’s taking time off. When does she have to return to Seoul?

Myung-yeo turns in surprise when Hae-won claims she doesn’t have plans to go back to Seoul anytime soon. While they grill potatoes over the fireplace, Myung-yeo presses her some more. What about her mom? Hae-won changes the subject and comments on the two new guesthouses nearby that she assumes are taking business from Myung-yeo.

Refusing to move on before she gets answers, Myung-yeo wants to know if Hae-won is seriously thinking of living here. Hae-won assures her she is. She’ll live like Myung-yeo, without any plans. Myung-yeo, who apparently wears her sunglasses at night, asks about the academy. Hae-won replies solemnly that she doesn’t think she’s qualified to teach anyone.

Myung-yeo calls bull on that—everyone just does what they do to make money. Hae-won remains insistent. Before going to bed, Myung-yeo advises her not to quit so easily. “And don’t talk like I’m wasting my life here.”

Hae-won thinks back to her confrontation with a student about her aggressive behavior. She’d called her out, and the girl raised her hand to hit her. We cut to the mother yelling about her precious daughter getting hit. When the smug girl accuses Hae-won of slapping her face, the mother slaps Hae-won back. Hae-won stands silently.

In the present, Hae-won goes for a nighttime stroll. As she stands taking in nature, Eun-seob rides up on his bike. After a beat, she greets him. Staring across the field, she asks if he knows what those “marshmallow-looking things” are. He replies they’re silage bales, which she now recalls. They fall silent as he stares at her staring out at the field.

The next day, Eun-seob almost jumps out of his skin when a voice sounds out of his pocket. It’s his father who insists on using walkie talkies despite being within shouting distance. Eun-seob finally complies, but then he spots Hae-won and goes into his Hae-won trance.

He tries to play it cool as his dad radios him about bringing a rake to the ice rink later and scolds him for not ending his communications with “over.” Ha, I like his dad already. Eun-seob asks Hae-won how long she’s staying and tries to look neutral when she says until spring. He tells her to ask if she needs something, like a car.

So she immediately asks to borrow his car, which takes him off guard. Ha. He tosses her the key. In the car, Hae-won notes to Myung-yeo that Eun-seob seems like a different person now. “Like someone who went missing for a while and returned.”

Myung-yeo initially finds that ridiculous but then remembers that he wasn’t around for years, although he wasn’t exactly missing. To Myung-yeo’s annoyance, Hae-won isn’t done with her questioning. She wonders why he calls Myung-yeo “noona” seeing as she’s over 40. And what’s with the sunglasses? “Did you get plastic surgery while I was gone?” Ha! Myung-yeo just sighs in frustration.

At Goodnight Bookshop, Eun-seob hand brews coffee as a young girl sits at the counter. She reads aloud, “That night, Irene asked me…” and Eun-seob rips what must be his journal out of her hands. She’d already seen his conversation with Hae-won about the “marshmallow-looking things,” though, and pesters him about who this “Irene” is.

Hae-won spots a keychain hanging from the car’s rearview mirror with the words “Goodnight, Irene” engraved on it. Turns out her and Myung-yeo are going shopping for the laundry list of tools Hae-won needs for her DIY projects around the house. She replaces doorknobs, fixes the faucet, repairs the stairs, and even paints the siding, to her aunt’s surprise.

“Isn’t it pretty?” Myung-yeo: “No. Not at all.” Heh. Hae-won chides her for her pessimism while Myung-yeo complains about Hae-won’s optimism. Myung-yeo worries the paint will crack when the temperature lowers, but Hae-won insists there won’t be any problems—she checked the weather forecast.

Cue thunderstorm. Myung-yeo dryly throws Hae-won’s words back at her as the storm rages through the night. Hae-won can’t sleep and ends up braving the storm to check on the freshly painted wall … which has now dissolved into a mint green puddle. To make her day worse, when she tries to go back inside, the door handle comes off in her hand.

She bangs on the door and yells, but the storm drowns her out. Hae-won runs to the other side of the house, but the side door is locked. Out of ideas, she spots the lights on at Goodnight Bookshop.

As usual, Eun-seob is struck silent when he sees Hae-won, but he comes to enough to let her in and pour her some coffee. As she warms up next to the heater, she admits she didn’t know he owned an actual bookshop. Eun-seob has been running it for three years.

She browses the shelves and sees a section with bookmarked books. He explains that he lets customers read whatever they want and bookmark where they left off. Hae-won asks why he chose the name “Goodnight Bookshop.” He says that, for many, basic things like eating and sleeping well are difficult. He chose the name in the hope that people can eat and sleep well.

Looking pensive, Hae-won wonders if eating and sleeping well are all there is to life. Eun-seob asks what else there could be. Hae-won notices the rain has stopped and gets up to leave. Eun-seob hops up and puts his coat down next to her, telling her to wear it home. Then, he sits back down to continue pretending to be indifferent as he reads.

As she leaves, she suddenly recalls a day back in high school where she’d seen Eun-seob’s notebook open on his desk. He’d written about his idea of a good life: waking up well, sleeping well, working well, and resting well. He’d ended the entry with “goodnight, everyone.”

The following day Hae-won decides to clean out the (disastrous) warehouse. Myung-yeo watches concernedly as Hae-won literally chucks things out into the yard. Elsewhere, Eun-seob has a calm breakfast with his family. Ah, so the girl who was snooping in his journal was his little sister IM HWI (Kim Hwan-hee).

In typical little sibling fashion, she sells him out and announces to their parents he has a new girlfriend named Irene. His parents are excited while he protests and argues with Hwi. There’s a relaxed vibe, and the family seems close. Eun-seob’s mom asks him to go shopping in the afternoon; she wants to start selling tteokbokki.

Eun-seob hesitantly asks to borrow his mom’s car. They’re shocked to learn he lent his car to someone. Hwi astutely guesses that he lent it to Irene, the girlfriend he denies having. They all start debating which country she’s from.

At Myung-yeo’s, an exhausted, dirt-smudged Hae-won trudges inside. She thinks back to her boss pressuring her to “research” a competing academy by pretending to be a student there for a month. Hae-won gave in and wowed the teacher with her cello ability. But it wasn’t long before she got caught.

Hae-won had held in her anger as her boss berated her for not being careful enough and unfairly blamed her for the entire situation. Adding insult to injury, her boss went on to say that Hae-won’s lessons were too boring which is why she’d wanted her to learn from the other academy’s teachers.

In the present, Hae-won answers the phone and starts to take down information for a reservation when Myung-yeo hangs up on the potential customer. She stuns Hae-won by admitting she reported the business as closed a year ago. Hae-won is upset, seeing as her grandmother ran this guesthouse her whole life.

Myung-yeo claims she’s gotten too old to keep running it, but Hae-won points out she’s only in her forties. How will she make money now? Myung-yeo essentially tells her to butt out and adds that she’ll pay her back for the repairs she’s done around the house. Hae-won didn’t do those for the guests—she did it for Myung-yeo.

Myung-yeo doesn’t buy that and scoffs that Hae-won never worries about her. She accuses Hae-won of just wanting to keep herself busy and coming here to escape reality. On the verge of tears, Hae-won admits it. “Is it fun to tell a fool she’s a fool?” Myung-yeo silently goes to her room while Hae-won takes a walk.

Of course, Hae-won runs into Eun-seob again outside the bookshop. It’s obvious she’s been crying, but he doesn’t say anything. Hwi passes by and yells from her bike, “Who’s Irene?” After a bit of pestering, she notices Hae-won sitting there. “By chance, is it this unni?”

Hae-won is understandably confused, and Eun-seob starts to panic. We flash back to Eun-seob writing a post to the “Goodnight Club”–an online group of insomniacs and night owls–in which he stated, “That woman is back.” In voiceover, as we see the day he met Hae-won by the field, he notes that the only reason he likes winter is that the leafless trees outside his window no longer block his view of her window. And every holiday season, she briefly comes back.

We get a flashback in a flashback as he reminisces about the first time she had asked him about the “marshmallow-looking things” when they were in high school. The conversation had been practically identical to the one they’d had recently. In the less remote flashback, Eun-seob writes that maybe he should invite Hae-won into the Goodnight Club.

The day his dad scared him with the walkie talkie, Eun-seob had been covertly looking for Hae-won. He continues that he probably won’t be able to say anything to her. The night of the storm, we see a new part of their conversation where she’d asked why he had so many copies of the book “Wind Blowing Through a Willow Tree.” He’d answered that it was an interesting book, so he’d bought various versions to see if they were all the same.

Then, she’d asked about the name of the bookshop. He remembers writing that snippet about living well that Hae-won had seen. In voice over, Eun-seob comments that “goodnight” has been an important part of his life, but he’ll never be able to reveal that to Hae-won because “I’m an idiot who doesn’t know how to comfort someone.”

We’re back in the present as he laments that he doesn’t know what to say to her after she’s been crying. Hwi rides up and makes a scene about Irene. On a whim, Eun-seob claims Irene is his sister Hwi. She’s baffled, especially since they never had that conversation in the field. He quickly shuts her up and chases her off.

Hae-won looks startled and suspicious. She surmises that the Irene from “Goodnight, Irene” on that keychain … He confirms that, yep, it’s his little sister. This seems to (understandably) concern her, and she declines a second cup of coffee. Eun-seob knows that he blew it, again.

He rushes inside to take a phone call and looks surprised as he utters, “Now?” Turns out there’s a high school reunion that night, and Eun-seob and Hae-won decide to attend. Eun-seob has occasionally attended the reunions over the years, but it’s Hae-won’s first time.

They join the rowdy group at a newly opened restaurant where everyone is teasing LEE JANG-WOO (Lee Jae-wook) about his supposed crush on a classmate back in the day. He insists that Eun-shil was the one with the crush, but her best friend at the time shuts that down.

Conversation turns to Hae-won teaching cello in Seoul. She nods and smiles but avoids talking about it. In an effort to put someone else in the hot seat, Jang-woo claims to know something about someone else’s crush. He points at Eun-seob and demands to know if his old crush is currently here.

Everyone turns to look at Eun-seob, but they encourage Jang-woo to let it go. Eun-seob might not come back at this rate. But Jang-woo isn’t easily dissuaded even when Eun-seob denies it. Jang-woo threatens to say it if he won’t. Finally, as everyone drum rolls on the table, Eun-seob admits, “It was Mok Hae-won.”

The whole table is shocked into silence, but none more so than Hae-won. The awkwardness is broken when one of the alumni (who brought her baby) looks into the stroller which is suddenly empty. Everyone frantically searches the restaurant and finds the baby playing in the other room. They joke he should grow up to be a magician.

That night, Hae-won sits on her bed flipping her light on and off. Eun-seob tries to write a post for his Goodnight Club, but he struggles to get past his embarrassment about what happened at the reunion. There’s a knock on his door, and he’s startled to see Hae-won.

She says she has a question to ask. “No,” he preemptively responds. She’s confused as he explains he was talking about the past. She realizes he’s referencing his confession earlier, and he clarifies that his crush is long over. And slams the door in her face. Ha! She jumps back in shock. Eun-seob bangs his head on the door, making them both jump again. He covers his face in embarrassment. This boy’s a mess around her.

Hae-won stands outside, debating whether to leave. As she’s turning to go, Eun-seob musters up the courage to open the door again. They stand facing each other awkwardly.

 
COMMENTS

First things first, this show is beautiful. The gorgeous setting in conjunction with the lovely use of silence create an introspective, tranquil ambiance. Too often shows try to fill silence with chatter or background music, but this drama embraces it. Dialogue and background music are used sparingly and purposely, allowing scenes to breathe. No intrusive pop music or overly chatty heroines here—just the sounds of nature and soothing instrumentals.

Although I appreciate the unhurried pace, I do have one stylistic caveat. I don’t mind a lingering shot, but I could do with a little less of the staring. Moments went on a beat too long, leading to unsettling staring contests between Hae-won and Eun-seob. If an acquaintance silently stared into my eyes for several seconds like that, it would induce anxiety, not romance.

It felt like this episode was merely setting the tone and pace. We’ve been introduced to the town and what life is like within it, but I’m not sure what the show is about yet. I mean, I know it’s a romance and all, but beyond that it’s hard to say where it’s going. As for the characters, even the few we’ve been introduced to remain a bit of a mystery. Hae-won and Eun-seob are both reserved, so it’s hard to get a read on them. All we really know right now is that Hae-won is reevaluating her life and choices, seemingly feeling lost, and Eun-seob has a serious crush which results in his losing the ability to think and speak properly. I don’t have a strong idea of who they are as people yet, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing since I have a feeling that will unfold as we go.

I’m curious to know what Myung-yeo’s deal is. What’s up with the sunglasses she never takes off? That combined with closing down the guesthouse makes me think she has some disease that’s affecting her eyes. Hopefully it doesn’t go full melodrama on us and give her some fatal condition. I did not come here for cancer. So far, I’m enjoying her apathy in contrast with Hae-won’s energy. But there’s one point I’m curious about. We know Hae-won grew up in the area, or at least attended high school there, but what about her parents? They don’t seem to live there now, so did they move away? Or did Hae-won grow up with her aunt instead?

This episode moved at a glacial pace, but I somehow wasn’t bored. I think the atmospheric nature of the show kept me engaged. But I do hope we get a little more movement as we go. I don’t mind a show that takes its time, but I need to know we’re headed somewhere. Honestly, though, they could chill in the bookshop sipping coffee all episode and it’d be like ASMR to me. I freaking love bookshops (and coffee). Bookshops are my happy place. So long as we keep getting gorgeous shots of the countryside, coffee brewing, and bookshop goodness, I’ll probably be more entertained than is called for.

 
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"If an acquaintance silently stared into my eyes for several seconds like that, it would induce anxiety, not romance."

HAHAHAHA! Very true.

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Such a warm and cozy premiere perfect for winter with a nice cup of coffee at hand. PMY as the girl who carries some hurt in her heart which surprisingly suits her and makes me intrigued by her character. I’m glad to see this side to her acting because it feels like I’m watching someone else. The atmosphere and music is also very calming that instead of being bored by its pacing I’m still watching. Hopefully however the episodes pick up in pace and we don’t spend too much time lingering on scenes with no dialogue

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I'm in the middle of summer & carnival, so maybe it not the best time for me to watch. I found to calm. I will hold until my winter.

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Such a warm and cozy premiere perfect for winter with a nice cup of coffee at hand.

That's what I kept thinking when I was watching:Warm and cozy(although I'd replace the coffee with tea. Coffee makes me twitchy).

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I loved this episode, and how we were introduced to most characters.
I specially loved EunSeob family, which is loud and expressive, apparently so different from him.
I love the cozy and slow way to the show.
I am the FF kind whenever there’s a gap of 20 seconds when nothing is happening and I didn’t use that button in this ep.
I’m really enjoying.

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I don't mind slow drama but in this one, the beginnin was really slow. I mean for a first episode, they could be more careful if they wanted to hook people.

But I liked it and I really want to know more about the characters. I really loved the aunt!

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Oh wow that was quick recap.

"-leading to unsettling staring contests between Hae-won and Eun-seob."

They're just trying to beat Come and Hug Me for Tension Filled Stare of the Year award. As long as JKY's next drama isn't a sad melo or thriller they should be fine ;)

This isn't a show I really feel like commenting on so early but I can only hope it keeps the melancholy cello background music the whole way through and doesn't forget its tone for pop ballads at bad times... >.>

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This show is so gorgeous. Episode 1 was filled with scenery porn. And the actors look so beautiful? This show is so calming, from the choice of books that they feature to the scenery, and the choice of background music: all are perfect for setting up a warm melancholic feel. Tbh I really have nothing much to say about this show at this point but the bits and pieces of Hae-won's life in the city broke me as it clearly shows how life can be silently harsh and how it makes me feel like seeing myself in a slump.

P.S. Finally seeing my Puppy, Lee Jae-wook, on screen again feels so surreal. He is a second lead (again) but his cheeks are back so that makes me happy! HAHA

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It's interesting that HW didn't defend herself in any way, as though she either was resigned to unfairness or had no other option. I wonder if the drama will also be about her gaining confidence and a sense of self-worth.

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I would love it if the drama would be focused on HW finding a sense of self worth, not just on her romance with ES.

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I hope that too.

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I love the music too. It helps the quiet atmosphere ❤️

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The music is so calming!

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I couldn't take its pace, I watched it at 1.5x otherwise it was becoming a snooze fest.
Also somebody tell him to stop drinking so much coffee at night, no wonder he is not improving on his insomnia.
(P.S. I loved how they know sleeping is a very hard thing, I low key wish the show is about insomnia and the slow pacing is there to make me fall asleep to help with my insomnia, is this show a big meta? )

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When I was studying for exams I used to follow the advice of others to drink some coffee, but the problem was I still have fallen asleep but really hard, almost didn't make it the following day (catching bus or train and arrive at school on time). The aftereffects were severe (dehydration, occupying toilet most of the time and twice my heart stopped to beat for like 30 seconds and after it was very painful when the blood rushed through) so from that time no coffee for me although I love coffee flavoured cakes and stuff.

But in his case he shouldn't drink coffee after 5pm. But I think it's cultural think, because Koreans love hand brewed coffee anytime, it's very cool for them. Maybe it was to show us that he has good taste and patience.

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Anyway, the kind of coffee he drinks, ok, it's coffee, but it's not.
I mean it's filter coffee... which is not coffee at all.

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Then what is coffee?

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Not filter coffee ;-)
Expresso, double expresso...
Filter coffee is very soft, I just mean that.

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From what I see of Korean TV they drink 'americano', which is not expresso. We also find it too weak, it's what we'd make at home if we don't have a proper coffee machine. But even then I prefer my stovetop or even my plunger.

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Wow

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This show is hitting the spot for me. I can kinda kick back and chill out. Love it. I feel like the lingering glances between HW and ES have a purpose. Like maybe she had him in her sights too, and she is just waiting for him to open the door and make a move? We don’t really know her perspective yet. Only his, but she seems to me to be drawn to him as well.

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same thought

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This showing is trying very very hard to be contemplative, it should stop trying and just do it.

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Thank you for the recap, @quirkycase !

I loved the music! When Bach started, I was sold, although it was expected when the FL was described as a cellist. The background music (not OST!) has both classical and jazz, which combined are my kind of sound. I think I will end up watching this for the music definitely.

I have a few questions, though:
-- Does the willow tree have a significance in Korean culture that this episode hints at in other ways?
-- Is the book they reference "wind in the willows?" or something else?
-- What is with the blog posts? Are they private, or for the bookclub that he runs (if the latter, won't they figure out who he's talking about?)?
-- Were TV screens in classrooms a thing in Korea even a decade ago (when the school scenes presumably are set)?

Besides this,
-- she takes an awfully long time to return the car!
-- I agree about the stares :p with eyes like that, it is all too intense and terrifying almost.
-- generally, translations on Viki are so much better than on Netflix! E.g., the 'keeping' explanation - I don't think you see equivalent explanations on Netflix at all. I also like how they retain the noona/oppa subtitles on Viki, because that gives so much context to the relationships between the characters.

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I double-checked, and it is indeed "The Wind in the Willows." Good catch! I just went with how it was translated and didn't connect the dots.

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Wondering if they're going to use book titles for episode titles throughout! (and make us keep guessing). Also wondering how WITW ties up with what happened in this episode. Who is Toad, and which is Toad Hall - Goodnight Bookstore or Walnut House?

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Oh, neat! I remember my mom reading that book to me when I was a kid. This is suddenly making me want to read it again.

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I'm curious about his blog posts also and whether he keeps it like a diary of sorts or if it's a public site.

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Yes, I was wondering that too! If it's public, his readership is surely outside the town he lives in? If it's like a personal diary, what's the point of the separate paper journal?

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This does feel like its going for the old 'art house cinema' feel. This could very well be a film set in the French countryside in the 1980s. But if there's one thing we know about K-dramas its their *inability* to keep the tone of their premieres. I'm sure this'll start feeling like a good-old K-drama again after a few episodes.

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Hopefully not but I can imagine that if not plenty out there would complain although they're tired of the usual k-drama plot. Mankind is peculiar in changes - desiring it but once it's done complaining about it.

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I haven't seen this yet but from the description--slow pace, minimal music, lots of staring--it sounds like they're harking back to dramas from 10-15 years ago.

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Been waiting for this show since they first promoted it, because Park MIn Young is my Korean Sandra Bullock. She plays these awkward characters that I usually end up rooting for. Haven't watched it yet, honestly, because I prefer to marathon several episodes in a row, but the "contemplative" pace doesn't turn me off. After binge-watching so many shows on serial killers, I'm happy to tune into a show that doesn't involve a murder in the backstory.

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Korean Sandra Bullock... oh, yes!!

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Its a bit jarring (though pleasant) to see Park Min-young with natural looking black hair. If you were to believe K-dramas you'd think every third Korean had frizzy red hair! Or at least auburn. Black hair in this series is of course a signal to the viewer what sort of drama this is going to be,

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it is slow, but i kinda love it. i dont mind it. and i am kinda worried it will goes into "pretty noona who buys me food" liking/obsession.

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Thank you @quirkycase for the recap. I haven't watched episode one yet so I have just made a quick scan of the recap and will return.

The reason for this post. I signed on to Viki today and I had this message waiting from me. It concerns the delay in having available episode one fully subbed. It is from the Channel Manager:

To I'll Go to You When the Weather is Nice Fans

Dear fans of "I'll go to you when the weather is nice",
unfortunately we discovered that one of our subbers, who had done 2/3rds of episode 1, had in fact plagiarized all her subtitles from another website. We will have to delete them all and do the work all over again.
I'm telling you so that you don't wonder why the episode was at 100% and suddenly it's much less.
We cannot allow such things to happen. Not only is it against Viki guidelines (those subs are copyrighted), but it's also against our own work ethic.
We ask for your understanding.
irmar
CM

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Did you hear my screams? Perhaps they could use our money and start paying for subtitles?

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That’s why I stopped paying my money to them. I would just give up and watch at another site. I would pay $20 a month for a site that had all the dramas, and had the subs ready same day.

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Ohh that's what I kept wondering. I checked it at 100 percent but then it just became 50 percent again.

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Oh ouch. I wonder why anyone would even bother to steal subtitles considering how little dialog there is in this premier. 'War of Prosecutors' seemed to be a struggle for Viki to sub with all its legal jargon and rapid-fire group discussions.

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RE stealing subs: people do that because then you can watch for free and get *some* not existent anymore perks.

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Wow.

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Glacial pace is right, but I'll give it a few more episodes. I'm in Alaska and we are all sick to death of winter and snow...watching even more winter on the drama was killing me. Hoping we get some story and pace speeds up considerably. Felt like treading water.

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For me, it was 1) I don't like Park Min Young anymore, just tired of her being in so many shows that I don't see the character, but only the actor. 2) I usually like Seo Kang joon unless they make his lipstick way too red...which they did. 3) Sometimes I'm in the mood for glacial pace but not today.
4) Dropped. 5) Maybe I'll try again in a few weeks when there's nothing else to watch (oh, wait, there's not that much good to watch already).

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There are too many shows airing in march, so if you wait a couple of weeks we might lose you forever ;-)
I didn't find SKJ lipstick too red, but maybe it's because I hate when actors have pink gloss O.o

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I've read that some are upset when females complain about other females appearance, so I thought I'd complain about a male's appearance for a change.

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I’m with you about PMY’s characters. I somehow ended up not knowing how I should feel about her characters in Healer, Remember and Queen for Seven Days. I often found myself rooting for the MLs in those dramas but not the FL. For me, and for me only, I could see only her acting but not her characters in the dramas.

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Yes, thank you! I finally found someone who feels the same way I do about PMY. In fact, I thought she was playing the same character (with the same name) in Healer and City Hunter, lol!

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I feel like she doesn’t seem to be connected with other things/characters in the dramas and I often found her gaze black and emotionless.

I know I’m in the minority here but this is just how I honestly feel about her as an actress.

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*blank not black

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While I really like PMY, I agree with what you said. She basically does the same roles and you're right that maybe it's not the role that is the same but PMY just playing those characters one similar way.

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His lipstick was more red purple than that of even PMY, was irritating.

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First two episodes were like reading familiar book again on rainy day with warm cup of a tea. May be I am in mood of serene and slow. I liked first two episodes.

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That's just it, isn't it. It's a mood thing and you have to be in that kind of mood. Today I wanted action and violence, but next week I'll probably want slow and moody.

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Yes it is. The reason I have watched so many crappy dramas and have not watched so many critically acclaimed dramas. To appreciate drama you need to be in mood just right for drama setting.

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This show feels warm and cozy and after the high tensions of CLOY, I could use some warm and cozy. Bumbling Eun-sob is adorable and I want one.

I also want to be part of the Goodnight Club(with a little less coffee).

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Show is much too slow for me. Barely anything happened this episode. Maybe I'll watch again in a few weeks if I'm bored enough.

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This show isn't for anybody looking for a grand romance and extraordinary plot. This show is more of Chocolate and A Poem a Day mashup with the melo, slow pace, laid-back vibe, internal monologues and life lessons through literature. I was looking for another melo to watch after Chocolate ended and this is what I was waiting for. I find myself laughing at Eunsob for being the typical Hogu in love that he is. I like them already. I came here for Lee Jae Wook too and I'm liking his character so far-- a contrast to his Extraordinary You character. JTBC makes good melo dramas and I'm hoping this will be one of them. ☕

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It it's A Poem A Day, she'll wind up with Lee Jae Wook.

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This has never been on my radar because I’m not particularly a fan of the leads; reading that it has the Chocolate’s vibe does give me that feeling of wanting to give it a go.. Now I’m in a dilemma.

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Yes, it also remind me partially to A Poem a Day.
I like that in the close titles we get to read again what EunSeob writes in his blog.

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That part reminds me of Go Deok Mi's lovely pieces in Flower Boy Next Door. Those parts of FBND had a similar vibe too with Eun-sob's private blogging.

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This drama got "Chocolate" vibe to me.
I'm happy to see Lee Jae-wook again.
And I agree with you, this show is like an ASMR to me too :D

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Thanks for this fast recap! O: Finally made time to watch this premiere. Books and coffee??! YAAAAS.

Everything looked soooo warm and cozy from the clothes to the fireplace. I wanted all of Hae Won's sweaters and scarves lol. The pace was slow with not much plot, but I surprisingly didn't mind at all. I think the background music and scenery/atmosphere helped. There were some funny moments that made me chuckle too. I liked seeing Hae Won fixing up the house.

I initially thought Eun Seob was going to be cold and distant when he learned that Hae Won came back so I was relieved to see him be awkwardly cute instead.

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Watched both episodes... Loved it 🥰🥰

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Also is anyone glad it's not an opposites attract kind of scenario..?? I like the fact that both our leads are the quiet and introspective type.... It makes for an interesting dynamic... Thou sometimes the silence can be overbearing... I'll give the actors and director a nod since the long pauses haven't irritated me yet as they usually wld....

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I like a lot about this show, but I have a gripe that just cannot be left unsaid.

As a former music major in college, WTH are music schools portrayed the way they are??? I mean, yes, there is competition. YES, sometimes it is fierce, sometimes it gets personal, sometimes teachers are too hard on you...all of those things are real. But it's NEVER the way it is portrayed, and frankly, I think the real thing would be more entertaining because you never really know who the villain is. Good god, I need to write a REAL music school drama.

Also, why why WHY are cello players ALWAYS portrayed as playing Bach's cello suite #1? I mean, it's lovely. For sure. I learned it as a horn player...it's important, too. But good grief, there's Dvorak, there's Elgar, there's...SO MUCH CELLO MUSIC!!! Why, entertainment industry? Why??? Or they could show the reality of being a musician...trying to find challenge and joy in something monotonous like Pachelbel's canon. But nope...always with the cello suite.

*Sigh*

I like the show, but that's so annoying to me. Lol!

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It's always great to see a specialist Beanie express their opinions about their area of expertise being portrayed in a Kdrama. I can't feel what you feel, but I can certainly imagine it.

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There is nothing quite like the Pachelbel Canon to drive you mad, to make you feel essential yet non-essential and gift you with just 4 notes and an earworm all at the same time. I was a violist, not a cellist, but our part wasn't much better. Gad, I hated playing that piece.

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I love the cello suites, so I didn't find it as troubling as you! But yeah, I get what you're saying - music representation in dramas tends to be cliched. I suppose it's because they have to cater to the popular audience, which will recognize something like Bach instantly. I'd watch your music school drama, for sure :D Let me know when it's ready for airing!

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I love that piece of music too, it's beautiful. But it is SO overused at this point that I almost found it distracting in this.

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Regarding Bach's Cello Suite #1: Partly it is just habit in the entertainment industry but also because everyone who plays the Cello knows it- and it is a little bit simpler than Dvorak, which makes it easier for the director and sound people to work with.

However, you will be pleased to know that in the second episode when they have her play the piano they do not have her play the more usual pieces by Chopin, Beethoven or Liszt but rather Erik Satie's Gymnopedie #1- a piece which the audience may sometimes hear as background music but which is almost never an actual part of the actor's performance.

The choice of Satie's piece was brilliant- because it so fits into the story. Unlike the 'impressionist' music of his contemporary Claude Debussy- which features broad strokes of lush chords and many musical lines the music of Erik Satie is distinguished by its elegant simplicity. It is the difference between the broadly splashed colors of a Monet painting when compared to one of those wonderful Japanese line drawings where the artist conveys so much meaning with just a few very carefully placed lines. When she plays the Satie piece it carries a boatload of meaning: It tells us that she never belonged in the big city because her heart belongs here in the countryside.

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@mehgann,
O/T. We YOUR HONOR fans could have used your expertise back in the summer of 2018 when we were trying to identify music in episode 24. The piece was so recognizable but it took awhile to identify it. Eventually iirc @pakalanapikake solved the mystery.
For Yoon Shi-Yoon fans who missed YH here is the clip with music from Tchaikovsky’s “Serenade for Strings in C major”:
http://www.dramabeans.com/videos-posts/2018/09/your-honor-episode-24-when-the-fake-judge-is-better/

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@marcusnyc20 bong-soo,
That feels like a such a blast from the past. Thanks for reminding me of this piece and its companion, which for me were two of the highlights of YOUR HONOR. I had totally forgotten that there was a KOCOWA clip containing it on DB. ;-)

Several Beanies attempted to identify the piece, which is documented starting here, along with pointers to my fan wall:

http://www.dramabeans.com/2018/09/open-thread-568/#comment-3302258
18 PakalanaPikake
September 7, 2018 at 8:04 AM

Eventually I was able to narrow it down to an original instrumenal arrangement based on Tchaikovsky after the 2-CD soundtrack was issued. But it was actually @ally-le Ally who determined it was based on his Serenade for Strings, Op. 48.

Fun times as musical sleuths. ;-)

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First episode is a snoozefest but it became better on the 2nd episode remind me of Lee Tae Ri and Ryu Jun Yeol movie little forest. Hope the story won't drag that much on the 3rd episode

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OMG FINALLY! A main lead I can relate to! He's quiet, reserved, awkward, spends his time surrounded by books, writes a journal and is more talkative online than in real life. Not to mention the obvious aloof act (the awkwardness leaking like crazy) he put on whenever his crush is around. I haven't had a crush on someone in 3 years, but that was totally me.

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And what a contrast to our usual K-drama male lead.

So I am not a woman and perhaps do not understand these things BUT- he is good looking, nice, endearingly awkward, etc:
Why hasn't some very smart lady snatched him up? I hope that the writers can come up with an explanation for his still being single.

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I don't understand it, either - what's wrong with those local ladies? I would be chasing him around the block. But perhaps he is one of those fellows for whom there is only one possible lady, the others just don't exist. Either way he is adorable.

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The first episode was very slow- and that is OK. It usually takes to episodes to set the scene in any drama.

And what a calming scene. the contrast drawn between the frenetic, abusive life back in Seoul and this beautiful country village could not be greater.

I like this new character that Park Min-young is playing- so very different from the other roles that I have seen her in.

So far the only off-putting thing has been her aunt. What gives?

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This show is a real life version of Animal Crossing. :0)

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Anyone knows what is the Korean title of the book Wind Blowing Through A Willow Tree?

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'The Wind in the Willows' [버드나무에 부는 바람] by Kenneth Grahame

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I can't believe no one mentioned Seo Kang Joon?? I saw him from Are you human too? Third charm and this drama! Same Seo Kang Joon but very different characters! He nailed it well! One common thing is his shy romantic look but in this one he seems care free and innocently in love. I think he did very well for this drama too.
It's 10 years waiting for his crush...This is really not for a busy urban lifestyled love! But it is real for a pure love like reading your favorite book or listening to your favorite song again and again! And that's amazingly so true when you are really in love!

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I'm a SKJ fan. I've really enjoyed his growth as an actor. The Watcher is my favorite drama he stars in.

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This is such a gorgeous and relaxing drama :)

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Finally the perfect autumnal weather to enjoy this autumnal drama.

It's a nice warm drama, like a cup of tea on a cold day with a good book kind of drama.

I'm going to be controversial though and say I think that Park Min Young and Seo Kang Joon are both miscast. I keep wishing the roles were taken by people who are less coiffed and attractively poised. It doesn't suit the characters, at least in this first episode.

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