Beanie level: Unemployed slacker in a sparkly tracksuit

WHEN THE CAMELLIA BLOOMS / OH HAE-YOUNG AGAIN

The Black Skirts: “In My City of Seoul” MV, Eng. lyrics
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=osdysFalds4

OHYA featured this MV. I was reminded of it (MORE)

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    (MORE)

    OHYA featured this MV. I was reminded of it when Dong-baek’s mother said she was born in the winter.

    “Down in Busan camellias are in full bloom
    But it’s still snowing in Seoul
    I call you to ask how things are
    and your voice tells me that its spring already in Busan.”

    One of my favorite earworms from OHYA, which has a great soundtrack and incredible sound effects. The sweet violins remind me of “Walk Away Renee” (The Left Banke, 1966).
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9_QVUfZv92U

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    (MORE)

    Inspired by The Loom of Language by Frederick Bodmer and Lancelot Hogben (New York: 1944), a favorite volume of my armchair-linguist Dad. 😉
    https://archive.org/details/TheLoomOfLanguage

    I have to love a language that has a word for “love at first sight” (fieschada) that is spoken in a micronation whose name means “inside the house” in Finnish. The 15-year-old monarch decreed the national motto to be “A man’s room is his kingdom.” 😉

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    No offense meant, but … wow, talk about having too much time on your hands! 😏
    Had he only known, he could have used Hangul with a few more letters thrown in to cover “v” and “th” and so on.

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      @bbstl,
      I was amazed that a 14-year-old devised a culture and its language in such amazing detail. I got the impression that King Robert I may have invented Talossa and its language as a way of dealing with his mother’s death. Even if that wasn’t what motivated him to brainstorm all this applied linguistics, it’s still quite a feat. It kind of reminds me of the teenager who cracked the code for Mayan glyphs. — Instead of hacking around doing dumb stuff and getting into trouble, they did something useful.

      LOL at using Hangul! Would that have made him King Sejong II?! 😉

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        Nah he’d only be Sejong II, or perhaps Tolkien II, if he invented a whole new writing system.

        Hangul is a very efficient writing system though, it can even be used to write Chinese, which whilst I’m sure would never become common place, I do sort of wish was a more well known fact. Although how dare hangul be able to write a 4000 word logographic script in just 28 featural alphabetic characters. THE NERVE.

        Did you know there is a dialect of Manadrin spoken is Kazakhstan that writes with CYRILLIC??? Of all things. *smh*

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      It’s really not all that surprising. Whilst certainly not COMMON there are quite a few constructed languages out there, particularly for fictional worlds. Not to mention the master himself, Tolkien. I’d be more impressed if he’d invented his own writing system to be honest. That’s far less common.

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Gene-whiz

The Yogurt Industry Has Been Using CRISPR for a Decade
https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2019/10/how-yogurt-science-accidentally-revolutionized-gene-editing/599767/
Daebak podcast

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    Link to information on the Gastropod podcast embedded in the Atlantic monthly article:

    https://gastropod.com/whats-crispr-doing-in-our-food/

    There are a passel of sidebars on CRISPR in the initial article, including ones on CRISPR’d human embryos.

    While the use of a bacterial “scalpel” to excise specific segments of genetic code sounds much more controlled than the “gun” used to blast a gene for fish “antifreeze” into Flavr Savr tomato DNA, I’m concerned that the biodiversity of “orphaned” crops could be lost in the rush to rapidly tweak plants that do not lend themselves to industrial farming. Preserve the original plants in seed banks for that time in the future when someone realizes with 20-20 hindsight that they goofed. Also recall how Monsanto persecuted and sued the pants off of farmers in Canada and the USA whose homegrown rapeseed varieties — many of them developed over decades of seed-saving to be habituated to their specific terrain and microclimates — became contaminated with GMO canola pollen that drifted on the wind from neighboring farms. It was patently egregious.

    The discussion with the Cornell scientist who has been working with groundcherries (related to tomatoes and tomatillos) mainly deals with reducing the plants’ rampant growth. Since they are related to deadly nightshade and every part of the plant is toxic except for the fruit in numerous species, why not address the solanine content? Solanine is a potent toxin that occurs in all of the nightshade plants, and seems to aggravate arthritis in certain individuals.

    For more on “orphaned” crops, see Plants For A Future‘s informative websites:

    http://plantsforafuture.theferns.info/ — Includes two dandy databases of temperate and tropical useful plants with photographs, browsable and searchable by common names and Latin binomial nomenclature.

    https://pfaf.org — Super-duper database of 7,000+ plants, searchable by common and Latin names, uses and properties, medicinal characteristics, suitability for agroforestry, etc. Daebak.

    https://www.loc.gov/item/lcwa00096227/ — Archived copy.

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      Even in Europe government is controling the origin of the seeds. You can’t grow your own seeds in majority of time when for business purposes, you have to buy those “official” ones. But people started to do some seeds banks to save grains and return to old species. I took for my garden old varieties of apple trees because they don’t need treatment, they resist well. The pollen from hybrids is very dangerous especially H1 one.

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        @BC,
        I know what you mean about the prohibition against saving seed from patented varieties. That is where the saving of non-patentable heirloom varieties is so much better. The fact that they are tough old strains that have stood the test of time makes them far superior to “hothouse” varieties reliant on coddling, pesticides, and chemical fertilizers. Over time the saved seeds develop into strains habituated to their particular terrains and microclimates. Especially with some of the small grains (wheat, barley, rye, oats), some folks are better able to digest the ancient “unimproved” varieties such as emmer, kamut, spelt, etc.

        As for heirloom apples, many of them taste so much better than the modern varieties bred to ripen in a short span of time, or withstand shipping, or be well-suited to cold storage. I’ve been fascinated by the many antique varieties dating back to colonial days that are still grown in places like New England. They have great names like Roxbury Russett, Rhode Island Greening, and Cox’s Orange Pippin. One of Thomas Jefferson’s favorites, Esopus Spitzenburg, was a “sport” (spontaneous mutation) that grew in the Hudson Valley in a town south of Kingston, NY — both of which were called Esopus after the local band of Lenape Indians who lived in the area.
        https://www.orangepippin.com/varieties/apples/esopus-spitzenberg

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Kirk Elder, RIP

https://townhall.com/columnists/larryelder/2019/09/19/kirk-the-best-brother-ever-rip-n2553341

What a warm reminiscence of big brother — and their dad’s inspiring letter.

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Warming up for Halloween

Mutant Giant Spider Dog (SA Wardega)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YoB8t0B4jx4&feature=youtu.be&t=30

Shelob, is that you?!

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    So hard to read. Infuriating that we don’t have this figured out for our veterans.

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      Part 1 of 3

      @bbstl,
      I’ve known a few vets (Vietnam era and a couple of younger Navy Seals) who have suffered greatly. Yes, they really do deserve a whole lot better. Nowadays trauma medicine saves the lives of soldiers who would have died of their wounds in earlier wars. Alas, the psychic toll has still not received the effective care and therapy it demands. One size does not fit all, and various approaches may be needed to find the key that unshackles a particular individual from war-torn misery.

      Owing to the painkillers so many are exposed to in the course of reconstructive surgery and rehabilitation, they are at tremendous risk of prescription opioid addiction. As if self-medication with alcohol and street drugs is not bad enough. For those with inborn metabolic susceptibility to depression, alcoholism, and addiction, it is a double whammy that is often ultimately fatal, especially when high-powered and extremely addictive painkillers such as oxycodone and fentanyl are involved.

      There are various approaches to dealing with combat trauma. The writer Maxine Hong Kingston used to conduct writing retreats for Vietnam vets. I once attended a walking meditation retreat facilitated by several of Vietnamese Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh’s senior American students at a center where MHK simultaneously held a veterans’ writing weekend. Our group was invited to sit and listen to the vets read their compositions without commenting. It was an incredible honor to bear witness to their efforts to heal from what they had experienced in Vietnam. Sometimes just showing up and listening with an open heart is the best medicine a person can offer.

      As a female civilian, I could never identify with their war experiences. But I could recognize the human courage it took to face their inner demons. It was only natural to give them a chance to speak and be heard. It was a far cry from the reception so many of them faced when they returned from their tours of duty. Being attentively listened to is the ultimate gift. I have experienced it myself. It is the exact opposite of the shunning – wangtta – that so many of them were subjected to.

      – Continued –

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      Part 2 of 3

      What is really sobering is how many walking wounded fathers and grandfathers of Baby Boomers were deeply affected by what they had experienced in both world wars and Korea. Throw in the economic rigors of the Depression they endured in childhood, and it’s no wonder that so many of our elders drank as much as they did. Many of The Greatest Generation never spoke about their wartime experiences, or did so only many years later – but the trauma ran in the background the whole time. Their children picked up on it, and blamed themselves for being the cause of nameless grief and existential despair.

      I Don’t Want to Talk About It: Overcoming the Secret Legacy of Male Depression by Terrence Real is an eye-opener in this regard. I’ve concluded that the drug and alcohol addiction that has afflicted successive generations of Americans since the 50s and 60s has its roots in the unrecognized and untreated wholesale PTSD that two generations of American soldiers brought back with them from the mechanized wholesale slaughter “over there.” The second-hand effects on their wives and children have been every bit as malign as garden-variety addictions, but with an added degree of silence and compartmentalization akin to that of Holocaust survivors.

      If you really want to trace it back, the roots lay in the ferocious fighting of the fratricidal War Between the States, when Gatling guns, predecessors of machine guns, and high-explosive munitions were just coming into use. It was the first step in the “mass production” of warfare. The ferocity of the fighting resulted in “soldier’s sickness”: addiction to painkillers such as laudanum – tincture of opium – which was also a remedy for diarrhea from poor sanitation. Dysentery and other intestinal diseases carried off huge numbers of troops, including one of my forebears before he even left Massachusetts. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laudanum.

      Opioid Crisis Has Frightening Parallels to Drug Epidemic of Late 1800s
      by Stephanie Pappas, September 29, 2017
      https://www.livescience.com/60559-opioid-crisis-echoes-epidemic-of-1800s.html

      – Continued –

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      Part 3 of 3

      The following New Yorker article is an excellent discussion of the toll that military service takes on families. I’ve read many of the linked articles, and there is plenty of food for thought. Highly recommended.

      The “Soldier’s Disease”
      by Amy Davidson Sorkin, November 11, 2010
      https://www.newyorker.com/news/amy-davidson/the-soldiers-disease

      Quoted in the above, this piece gives background on Civil War veterans and the difficulties they faced with their families after the war ended:

      Lest We Forget, Marriage Is Often a Forgotten Casualty of War
      by Elizabeth Abbott, Contributor
      https://www.huffpost.com/entry/lest-we-forget-marriage-i_b_782279

      As we saw only too clearly in MR. SUNSHINE and NOKDU FLOWER, the high-tech mechanized weaponry adopted by Japan when it modernized its military along the Prussian model in the late 1800s resulted in wholesale slaughter of a kind that had not been seen before. Infantry charges across no man’s land swept by machine guns guaranteed as much carnage as the charge of the Light Brigade into the teeth of cannon during the Crimean War. Dong-hak foot soldiers armed with bamboo spears swarming uphill against rifles, artillery, and machine guns on the heights didn’t stand a chance. It was like shooting fish in a barrel. Military technology continued to advance during the Spanish-American War and WWI with the emergence of aerial warfare, Big Bertha long-range cannon mounted on railroad cars, tanks, and mustard gas. Each of them caused new forms of trauma. And so it continues to the present day.

      -30-

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        PP, *sigh* you’re so smart and write so beautifully. Thank you for all this ♥️

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          You’re welcome, @bbstl. Sorry to get up on my soapbox. This stuff hits close to home. Much of it is just a part of the human condition. But not all of it. Breaking the perpetuation of dysfunction across generations would be a good thing.

          Now go listen to Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young sing “Teach Your Children” from the Deja Vu LP. It hits the nail on the head. 😉

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Ye Olde Slang

https://www.nj.com/entertainment/2019/10/hey-you-guys-why-do-we-say-you-guys-heres-the-400-year-old-origin-story.html

Shouldn’t it be “youse guys”?! Synonymous with “varlet.”

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Meerkats

compare the meerkat market baby oleg funny insurance commercials ads 2019
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JHo-nQWKtOw
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compare_the_Meerkat

Great fun. Simples!

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Coming soon to a Kdrama?

In the rush to harvest body parts, death investigations have been upended
https://www.latimes.com/business/story/2019-10-13/body-parts-harvesting-hinders-coroner-autopsies

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    Hooooooley moley 😮 There are cadaver parts in people’s cosmetic procedures???

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      @bbstl,
      Shocking, eh?

      But what makes me mad as hell is the way that for-profit companies are aggressively scavenging body parts (and compromising autopsies — and criminal investigations!) without any kind of recompense to the families of the deceased. And look at the prices they are charging for human tissues! It is obscene beyond words. These tissues should be grown in culture, just like the pink goo that is supposedly going to replace the flesh of domestic animals in the food supply. Cancer cell lines have already been grown in vitro for decades, so I don’t see how growing healthy cartilage, bone, or other organ tissues could be such a big deal. (I’m no biologist.)

      Some years ago, I freaked out when Mr. P. had to have reconstructive surgery because of an abcess in his upper jaw that required the installation of a bit of bone to serve as a scaffold into which new bone could knit. I had read of cases in which unscrupulous funeral parlors in the NYC area had been caught parting out corpses for bone and other tissues prior to burial. The late Alistair Cooke was one such unwilling donor whose body was desecrated. I had also read of a case in which a patient who received an illegally-sourced bone transplant ended up with cancer because the donor had that affliction.

      Thankfully, our dentist described in detail how ethically-sourced bone tissue is treated to annihilate all pathogens (via irradiation, IIRC), so I could stop freaking out.

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        I also have a dental implant which required insertion of some cadaver bone. I pictured it as a tiny piece of bone coming from someone who had willed their body to a medical school, never did I dream that there was this trade going on.

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Tale of Genji

New chapter of world’s first novel discovered in Japan, 10/12/19
https://nypost.com/2019/10/12/new-chapter-of-worlds-first-novel-discovered-in-japan/

No one noticed a plot hole?

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MUSIC

10 Obscure Chinese Musical Instruments
https://theculturetrip.com/asia/china/articles/10-obscure-chinese-musical-instruments/

Gotta love the bianqing — for making the original rock music!

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WAR OF THE ARROWS, OST Track 01

JAM String Orchestra: “Survive”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ku923H_-r3c

This is my idea of sageuk music. Composed & arranged by Kim Tae-seong.

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    Yes, this is my idea of sageuk music too! I guess I took such music for granted: the long melodic lines, epic string orchestras, drums that make the heart beat faster… I’ve been spoiled by so many good soundtracks! Now I’m missing it in MY COUNTRY. Sadly the modern tracks are not all working for me.

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      @wishfultoki,
      I really love the sound of the traditional instruments, and am a total sucker for hageum, gayageum, and geomungo in particular. In combination with piano and modern orchestral instruments, the results can be a wonderful fusion.

      Instead of a ballad, I think they should have gone with instrumental music. For me, it’s not horrid. I can think of far worse examples of misbegotten sageuk soundtracks.

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      PD Kwak is the only one that made it work for me. MY COUNTRY is bit too traditional for modern tracks.

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MY COUNTRY / A FROZEN FLOWER – Goryeo Music

Joo Jin-mo, vocal & geomungo: “Ssanghwajeom” [“A Frozen Flower”]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lFWIgToLukY

Here’s the story behind the song: (MORE)

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    (MORE)

    Page 1 of 2

    Joo Jin-Mo has a wonderful singing voice! He and Zo In-sung both play geomungo in the movie, while Song Ji-hyo plays bipa.

    English lyrics can be found in comments by (1) RemusKingOfRome5, 5 years ago; (2) +magusia333 You’re welcome, 3 years ago. There are Romanized Korean lyrics, too.

    Here’s the story behind the song, which is actually a poem, “Saengmokin [(Semu), or ‘colored-
    eye people’] Bakery,”
    aka “The Turkish Bakery.”

    With the Mongol armies came the so-called Saengmokin (Semu), or “colored-eye people”, this group consisted of Muslims from Central Asia.[184] In the Mongol social order, the Saengmokin occupied a position just below the Mongols themselves, and exerted a great deal of influence within the Yuan dynasty.

    It was during this period satirical poems were composed and one of them was the Sanghwajeom, the “Colored-eye people bakery”, the song tells the tale of a Korean woman
    who goes to a Muslim bakery to buy some dumplings.[185]”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goryeo#Islam

    See also: ”Ssanghwajom” (“The Turkish Bakery”) in Lee, Peter H. “Popular Poems in the Koryo Dynasty as Described in the Koryo Sa and Akchang Kasa.” Oriens Extremus 5, no. 2 (1958): 202-27.
    http://www.jstor.org/stable/43383351.
    http://oriens-extremus.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/OE-5.2-5.pdf [p. 217 (PDF pg. 16 of 26)]

    Note: In the same article are entries for two other poems/songs that have been used in the soundtracks of several sageuk dramas and films:

    1. “Chongsan pyolgok” (“Song of the Green Mountain”) on p. 218 is sung in SIX FLYING DRAGONS as a solo by Byun Yo-han and as a duet by him and Lee Cho-hee. It is also performed by Yeonsangun’s court musician, Wolhamae (Hwang Suk-jung), who sings a version of “Song of the Green Mountain” aka “Green Mountain Special Tune” during her final performance with her bipa Ribbon Friend in ep. 29 of REBEL: THIEF WHO STOLE THE PEOPLE.

    2. “Gashiri” (“Would You Go?”) on p. 219 has been sung by Song Ji-hyo with bipa (Korean pear-shaped lute) accompaniment in A FROZEN FLOWER. I thought I’ve heard it in another film or drama, but have been unable to locate it.

    https://www.jstor.org/action/doAdvancedSearch?q0=popular+poems+in+the+koryo
    +dynasty&f0=all&c1=AND&q1=Lee&f1=all&c2=AND&q2=&f2=all&c3=AND&q3=&f3=all&c4=AND&q4=&f4=all&c5=AND&q5=&f5=all&c6=AND&q6=&f6=all&acc=off&ar=on&la=eng+OR+en&sd=&ed=&pt=oriens+extremus&isbn=&dc.asianstudies-discipline=on&Search=&group=none

    – Continued –

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    (MORE)

    Page 2 of 2

    More Goryeo Soundtracks:

    SIX FLYING DRAGONS, OST Part 8, Track 1

    Byun Yo-han: “Song of Chungsan [Green Mountain] I” (Eng. & Arabic lyrics)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C5agy7Vogsg

    SIX FLYING DRAGONS, OST Part 8, Track 2

    Lee Cho-hee & Byun Yo-han duet: “Song of Chungsan [Green Mountain] II” (Eng. lyrics)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XQ4BR9pEhtA

    Hangul/Romanized/English lyrics for both versions:
    https://wiki.d-addicts.com/Six_Flying_Dragons_OST

    A FROZEN FLOWER, OST

    Song Ji-hyo vocal & geomungo: “Gashiri” (“Would You Go?”)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EA-UeewJcfU

    Hangul & English lyrics in comments by Lyn Ngo, 6 months ago [as of 10/10/19].

    -30-

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    My favorite quote:

    “I want to be wealthy and ruthless … I want to be the first black bitch on television.”

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    Also, you’ve triggered mom memories for me. I never heard the full score for No Strings but I’m certain I heard Mom humming The Sweetest Song (YouTube) around the house. Mom was bonkers over Richard Kiley.

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      @tsutsuloo,
      I kind of recognized the opening bars, but never knew the name of the song. I’m more familiar with Richard Kiley for MAN OF LA MANCHA. Which is one of my Mom memories. My folks took us kids to hear Jerome Hines of the Metropolitan Opera perform in the title role of Don Quixote (Richard Kiley had won a Tony Award for his rendition of “The Impossible Dream”) at the Paper Mill Playhouse in Millburn, NJ in the early 70s, IIRC. It was fantastic.
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerome_Hines
      https://www.nytimes.com/2003/02/05/arts/jerome-hines-is-dead-at-81-sang-at-the-met-for-41-years.html

      What stood out as I listened to “The Sweetest Song” is the excellence of the singers’ enunciation. It is so perfect and clear. A far cry from the flannel-mouth mumbling I hear on American TV that prevents me from understanding dialogue. Thanks that link. It’s a treat to hear such singing — and lyrics. 😉

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        My mom had tickets to see Richard Kiley play Don Quixote. He was too injured (his arm? his knees? I can’t remember exactly) to perform that day and was substituted by his stand-in. It was one her Great Disappointments.😕

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          @tsutsuloo,
          Wow, I can imagine what a bummer that must have been for your Mom. But that’s also part of the charm of live theater. No two performances are ever identical. And every once in a while, an understudy’s performance catapults them into the big leagues. 😉

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Fast Folk

David Massengill: Intro & “Rider on an Orphan Train” live
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KCnM3mducJs

Stanley Cornell, orphan train rider
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Z3djWoTGFU

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PARASITE

On Netflix and next projects, a night in genre-king Bong Joon-Ho’s lecture hall
by Nathan Mattise – 9/28/2019
https://arstechnica.com/gaming/2019/09/__trashed-14/

@U of Texas, Austin (MORE)

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American satoori

https://www.readingeagle.com/news/article/signs-you-live-in-pennsylvania-dutch-country

“Outen the lights” (turn off the lights) is one I learned as a kid from our neighbors.

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    title of article:
    Do you speak the lingo in Pennsylvania Dutch Country? Here are 21 words and phrases you should know
    08/31/2019

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    “Outen” that’s interesting. I had never heard this.

    However, I did just hear the following conversation snippet between two shoppers, a couple of hours ago in one of the refrigerated sections of a local grocery store …..

    Shopper 1: “I want to buy this drink but nevermind, it’s been refrigerated and I don’t want it cold.”

    Shopper 2: “Well, you could uncold it.”

    Shopper 1: “No. You can’t do that. Once something is cold, you can’t uncold it.”

    Shopper 2: “Oh you’re right. You can’t uncold it.”

    “Uncold”. Seriously. I kid you not. *shakes head*

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      @korfan,
      What part of the country are you in? Actually, I’m wondering which planet the speakers were from as the physics seem to be very different from what Mr. Einstein and Sir Isaac Newton were able to figure out about thermodynamics on planet earth.

      “You can’t uncold it.” Of course you can’t. You just have to let it warm up.

      As for “outen,” that’s recognizable to me as a German speaker. The -en ending comes from the polite singular imperative form of a verb, which no longer exists in English but may have in the past when it was closer to its Germanic roots.
      e.g., “Bitte, Machen Sie die Tür zu.” = Please shut the door, with Sie meaning (polite singular) you; the separable-prefix verb is zumachen].
      Thus the meaning is along the lines of “[turn] out the lights.”

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        In southern California. Certainly on any typical day one will hear a variety of words and languages here, but this is definitely the first time I’ve heard “uncold”. It’s just not a proper English word no matter how you look at it.

        While I’ve specifically never heard “outen”, I do recall hearing “guten morgen” from an elementary school teacher who spoke German and was kind enough to teach us a couple of German words throughout the school year! “Outen” did remind me of that time! How cool that you speak German!

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          @korfan,
          Ah, you’re clear across the country. I’m in NJ about 25 miles from the Delaware River. While I’m not exactly near Pennsylvania Dutch country (that would be down in southeastern PA in Lancaster County a couple of hours’ drive from here), I did grow up next door to a family from Wilkes-Barre near Scranton in north-northeastern PA. That had been coal country at one time, but many of the mines closed after WWII, and many people came down to NJ to work at Bell Labs, for instance. (Amazingly enough, here in northern NJ and Rockland County, NY [about 30 miles north of NYC], there were working zinc and iron mines up until the 1950s and 1960s.) Anyway, my neighbors’ speech was a little different, and that was because of the Pennsylvania-isms.

          My guess is that the “uncold” folks may not have been native speakers. Otherwise, I can imagine William Saffire, the late word pundit, spinning at high RPM in his grave.

          How cool to have had an introduction to German in elementary school. 😉

          In the case of “guten Morgen,” that phrase is short for “[I wish you a ] good morning.” In German, nouns are capitalized and have an associated article [der, die, or das which is masculine, feminine, or neuter, and is declined according to how it is used in a sentence] (der Morgen, den Morgen). The noun is used as a direct object in the phrase, so the adjective “gut” is given the accusitive ending -en — which is different from the formal singular imperative verb that was glommed onto the English loan word out in Pennsylvania German. (English only has “the” and “a/an” as articles associated with nouns, and no longer declines them.)

          I think I got carried away with the grammar lesson. LOL! It’s actually one of the things that I like about German. The rules are more consistent than those of English, as are the spellings. Even so, there were times when I was translating complicated passages from late 19th-century academic German that I had to resort to diagramming sentences to figure out what was being said. 😉

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            Very interesting to hear and know about the different, regional language-isms!

            No, you didn’t get carried away with the grammar lesson! Heh! I certainly appreciate the time you take to explain such details, such as the ones mentioned about the German language. Thanks, @pakalanapikake! 🙂

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