Beanie level: Rooftop room dweller

OVER THE GREEN FIELDS / ON THE PRAIRIE OST

Sad Korean Song – “Sad Romance” (Voice Ver.)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Q06HmECG-Q أغنية كورية حزينة جدا

0
0

OVER THE GREEN FIELDS / ON THE PRAIRIE OST

Ji PyeongKyeon (지평권): “Sad Romance” [aka “Sad Violin”]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fUcJxzDGyXI

Beautiful!

1
0
1
0

Korean Royal Family
http://ethlenn.blogspot.com/2011/07/korean-royal-family.html

Titles and forms of address. Daebak reference for sageuk watchers!

3
4
2
0

SHOULD WE KISS FIRST?, Ep. 3 BGM

Paul McCartney and Wings: “The Long and Winding Road” (Wings Over America LP, 1976) – in lieu of Beatles version
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R4PNZoxoG3s
@24:15…

1
1

SHOULD WE KISS FIRST?, Ep. 2 BGM

Main Theme, 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY: “Also Sprach Zarathustra” by Richard Strauss
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vWF1glZWQa8

@13:00 as Moo-han exits revolving door.

1
0

Don McLean: “If We Try” & “Empty Chairs” live at National Stadium, Dublin, Ireland (1975)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2n_vqwRCI34

“Empty Chairs” (American Pie LP, 1971) inspired Lori…

1
1

    “Empty Chairs” (American Pie LP, 1971) inspired Lori Lieberman’s poem on which “Killing Me Softly with His Song” is based. “If We Try” is from his excellent third, self-titled LP released in 1972.

    0
    0

SHOULD WE KISS FIRST?, Ep. 4 BGM

Roberta Flack: “Killing Me Softly with His Song” (1973), lyrics
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kgl-VRdXr7I

@18:40 in the LP bar. Lori Lieberman’s reaction to…

1
1

SHOULD WE KISS FIRST?, Ep. 4 BGM

James Taylor: “You’ve Got a Friend” (1971) with lyrics
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r-n2yuwTcmc

@14:10 when In-woo and Moo-han first enter the LP bar.

1
0

SHOULD WE KISS FIRST?, Ep. 4 BGM

Peter, Paul & Mary: “500 Miles” (1962)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ADN1lLEp3H0

@13:15 in the bar where In-woo brings Moo-han to meet Mi-ra and Soon-jin.

1
0

RADIO ROMANCE, Ep. 8 BGM

Charlie Puth: “One Call Away” [Official Video]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BxuY9FET9Y4

1
0

TAKE OFF OST / THE BEST HIT

Loveholics: “Butterfly” [MV] [HD] [Eng Sub]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NeMM406FIGU

Thanks to Laica for IDing this song in THE BEST HIT in her retro film review. 😉

4
0

JUST BETWEEN LOVERS, Ep. 14

Elsa Kopf: “Candy Street” (Acoustic Joys, 2011)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i6jj6XvA7w0

@ about 27:00 – Joo-won & Yoo-jin in bar. “I’m just the queen of pain…”

4
4

    Hi, @pakalanapikake! Read your reply and am posting this here.

    Today is the eve of the Chinese Lunar New Year, the start of a very important and auspicious celebration for the Chinese. I’m Chinese, and have been busy preparing for it. Tonight, we had a reunion dinner to herald the start of the Lunar New Year, with relatives and close family members. It’s like Xmas, where we get to see family members from all over, and it was really nice seeing them. We ate at a nice Chinese restaurant, had scallops and crab soup in place of the shark fins’ soup that used to be a staple at such reunion dinners. It’s now been outlawed in my country, Malaysia, even though we stopped eating shark fins long ago…can’t eat shark’s fins after watching those horrific documentaries showing fishermen hacking off those shark fins and throwing the sharks back in the waters…urghh.

    Tomorrow will be another busy day of visiting relatives and having lunch with them, this time at my brother-in-law’s house, distributing red packets of money to the children (“hong baos” in Chinese: “hong” means red and “bao” means packet)…my youngest son who’s the only one of his generation with us – my elder son (he’s 23) is studying in the UK and his cousins live in Australia – will be the only “child” (he’s 20) to receive the hong bao LOL.

    On Saturday, my daughter, who’s my eldest, and her husband and one-month-old baby comes to my house to visit and collect baby’s hong bao from us, and have lunch with us. I’m cooking this time.

    What else? My neighborhood is predominantly Chinese, so firecrackers are released at 10-minute intervals the whole night. It’s like a war zone out here, with the smoke and smell from the firecrackers. It’s illegal to set off firecrackers but the police are so nice they turn a blind eye (and ear) to the firecrackers at this time of the year.

    That’s it then, my update on what’s happening over here in my part of the world. I hope you are safe and happy in New Jersey. Take care, my friend, and Happy Lunar New Year to you! It’s the Year of The Dog btw! Woof Woof!

    1
    1

      Gung Hay Fat Choy, @yyishere! Thank you for your Lunar New Year greetings! Here’s wishing you and your loved ones a most auspicious Year of the Dog! Bow wow!

      You have reminded me of my first New Year’s Eve (Western, not lunar) in Honolulu. I had recently moved into my first-ever apartment and was living alone down the hill from the University of Hawaii. I was sick in bed, and feeling crummy. My apartment was on the second floor of a three-story cinder block building, roughly at the same level as the nearby H1 freeway that cuts east-west across Honolulu, a stone’s throw from the underpass that was the only means of exiting my little neighborhood.

      I know exactly what you mean about your neighborhood in Malaysia being like a war zone! Firecrackers went off all night, including in the underpass, the better to amplify the detonations. Gunpowder smoke hung heavy in the air, too. The next time I walked through the underpass there were mounds of exploded firecracker remains all over the place. It made Fourth of July fireworks back home in New Jersey (where it’s also illegal, as in Hawaii and Malaysia) seem pathetically wimpy by comparison. Needless to say, I got little if any sleep that night. LOL!

      Your family reunion dinner sounds so lovely. How long has your elder son been in the UK? I hope he’s keeping warm in the gloom of a northern European winter. Coming from sunny Malaysia, it must be quite a switch for him. I think I read that they’ve been having an especially cold winter this year. Brrr.

      Shark’s fin soup. I think I’ve eaten it once in my life, 35 years ago when the Japanese school I was teaching at had a big dinner at the end of the term. The cartilage had a peculiar texture. That would have been before the documentaries on the “harvesting” came out, otherwise I wouldn’t have touched it with a ten-foot pole. Knowing what I know now about the importance of sharks to the marine ecosystem, I’m all for leaving their fins where they belong. Why exactly was shark’s fin soup considered to be such a festive dish?

      Ah, yes, hong bao. Red envelopes. Is “bao” the same character as in cha siu bao (steamed roast pork buns)? I’d guess that steamed buns could be considered a kind of packet. In Hawaii, bao are a popular snack, where they are called “manapua,” short for “mea ʻono puaʻa,” which means “delicious pork thing” (ono = delicious; pua’a = pig). I like red bean bao, too.

      I hope the rest of your family get-togethers have been fun, and that you’ve gotten a chance to put your feet up. I imagine you’ve been cooking up a storm. 😉

      Thanks again for thinking of me, YY, dear Chingu. Me ke aloha pumehana (with warmest aloha) and best wishes for health, happiness, and peace to you and your family. May you be rich! 😉

      1
      2

        @pakalanapikake We actually started off with a Lunar New Year Prosperity Dish, which is basically a strange assortment of bite-sized prawn crackers, strips of carrots, green strips of something (no idea what it was) , pomelo rinds, and raw slices of fish, all placed on a wide shallow plate, the waitress sprinkled sesame seeds, some powder (guess that was the seasoning), and some sesame oil, uttered some good wishes for luck and prosperity, and then all the family members stood up and used their chopsticks to mix everything up, raising our hands high as we mixed, the higher the better, because the higher you raise your hands, the more luck you’ll receive haha, and you have to say out loud, as loud as you can, “LO LO LO”, which I think means mix, mix , mix??? Besides that, we had roast duck and steamed free range chicken served with a kind of Thai green ginger garlic paste, pounded, chillied prawns in some dark sauce…no idea what it was, I thought it was tamarind, because that’s popular with Chinese diners, but it wasn’t that sour, so I guess it was some special sauce, but the prawns were fresh, and so thick and you could bite into them and feel your teeth sink in all the way…yummy! Then there was an abalone dish – a must for the Lunar New Year – they piled the abalones, stacked up like a sloping wall, and when you pushed them aside you could see the salad vegetables inside, crispy and hot, and fresh oysters in between…this was my favorite dish, loved the veges! The steamed fish was some expensive fish, can’t remember what it’s called, but it had eyes low on each side, like a snakehead fish, they piled fried garlic on top of it and it was good. We had sticky mushroom rice wrapped up in lotus leaves, another Lunar New Year staple. The dessert was shaved mango ice, so cold and refreshing,and really really good.

        Shark’s fin soup was considered a delicacy for the curative properties of the fin, I think…the Chinese like to eat parts of exotic wildlife and sealife to boost their human prowess…they eat snakes and dogs (OMG), squirrels, turtles, not sure whether they eat cats, bats or rats, but I won’t be surprised if they do. I had an uncle who would lean out the window and stone the odd random unfortunate squirrel snoozing in the huge guava tree outside my grandma’s house…I remember he cooked the squirrel, and later sat there at the kitchen table, chewing and looking very happy, and inviting us to eat it with him, and my aunt just looked sick and shook her head haha.

        My elder son is studying medicine at Dundee, Scotland. This year will be his fourth year there. He says it’s cold and the wind is killing in winter, but otherwise, he’s pretty okay with life there.

        Thanks for the best wishes, my friend. Oh, before I forget, yes, the “bao” character is the same for both the steamed “bao”, and the “hong bao”, it means a wrap, or to wrap. And when you mentioned Honolulu, it makes me think of Mark Wiens’ poke food videos in Hawaii…yum yum.

        1
        0

        Wow, @yyishere! You guys really know how to celebrate! What a sumptuous feast! Everyone stirring the platter of prosperity food to activate the ch’i for the new year sounds like a blast. Plus it must really whet the appetite. 😉

        I seem to recall reading that sharks have strong powers of self-healing — as do turtles. They do not have bony skeletons, but cartilage. Ingesting it might be helpful for people with connective tissue disorders and arthritis. Shark liver oil is high in vitamin A, which isn’t surprising for an apex predator. In Hawaii, shark is an aumakua (protective ancestral spirit).

        I had to chuckle at the story of your uncle bumping off squirrels snoozing in the guava tree. Did he make them into a stew? In the American South, Brunswick stew is made with small game, especially squirrel and rabbit (and nowadays, chicken). But the origin of the stew may be in Braunschweig, Germany.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brunswick_stew

        Over here, the critters are called “tree rats” because they are so destructive, especially of electrical equipment. Many power outages are caused by them getting themselves fried on electrical lines and inside transformers. Flash-fried squirrel flambé. Urg!

        My hat is off to your son in Dundee. That’s a good bit further north than Hamburg, where I studied for a semester. Dundee is at about the same latitude as Copenhagen, while Hamburg is roughly the same as Dublin. I came home via Copenhagen and Dublin in mid-December, and the dreary darkness in those places really got to me. During my work-study program, I’d go to my internship in the dark, and by the time I was on my way home, the moon was already up. Very depressing. Not to mention cold. I may have Irish and Scots and vikings in my family tree, but that doesn’t make me like the ancestral climate. LOL! Give me Honolulu any day! 😉

        Thanks for the linguistics lesson on bao! 😉

        0
        0

Korean Rock / Trot

Cha Sik-jung 정차식: “I Will Forget You” 나는 너를 – Live
(시그널 SIGNAL OST, Part 3)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nPz6Rl0lpEw

Great violin! Listen to the end for that low note. Daebak!

3
0

Korean Rock / Trot

[시그널 SIGNAL OST, Part 3] Cha Sik-jung 정차식: “I Will Forget You”
나는 너를
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9bZYSjUADrw

Check out the live version with violin. Both are daebak!

2
0

Korean Rock

김윤아 (Kim Yoon Ah): “길 (The Path)” tvN SIGNAL OST, Part 4
[Kor|Rom|Eng] Lyrics
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oe5J2l2scl8

The OST convinced me to watch SIGNAL. Daebak!

4
0

Korean Rock

전인권, 가슴을 파고드는 목소리! ‘사랑한 후에’ 《Fantastic Duo》판타스틱 듀오 EP28 [Jeon In-kwon: “After Love”]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QoOhCNPJZVA

Killer guitar solo! Guest has a great voice. Daebak!

1
0

Korean Rock

Jeon In-kwon & Huh Seongwook: “After Love” (1987) English Subtitles
전인권 사랑한 후에 영어자막
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-ZzZtt1Qx8

tune = Al Stewart’s “Palace of Versailles” (1978)

2
0

Korean Rock

Deulgukhwa 들국화 [Wild Chrysanthemum]: “Don’t Worry, My Dear”
들국화 걱정말아요 그대 영어자막 LIVE, 2013 (English Subtitles)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wf8-bMGyHQk

1
0