Beanie level: Fan club president

MY LOVE PATZZI, Ep. 5 BGM

Bee Gees with Boyzone: “Words” live in Las Vegas (1997)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P3r46jpeYv8

@35:00 as Song-yi takes a break & agonizes over admitting (MORE)

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    @35:00 as Song-yi takes a break & agonizes over admitting the truth about the fire to Seung-Joon.

    28 years (not 20!) after the Bee Gees landed a top ten hit in the UK and reached #15 in the the Billboard Hot 100, Boyzone scored their first UK #1 hit with “Words” in 1996.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Words_(Bee_Gees_song)

    This clip is a lovely collaboration between the two groups.

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MY LOVE PATZZI, Ep. 5 BGM

Backstreet Boys: “As Long As You Love Me” live on TOP OF THE POPS (1997)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-LNBKktn1vs

@29:20 as Song-yi walks alone across the park.

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MY LOVE PATZZI, Ep. 5 BGM

Roy Orbison: “You Got It” (1988)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0zDjnDAwmig

@13:00 as Song-yi reflects on Kang Seung-Joon’s feelings. Composed with Jeff Lynne of (MORE)

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    Composed with Jeff Lynne of Electric Light Orchestra and Tom Petty. Thank you, Traveling Wilburys (who also included George Harrison and Bob Dylan), for rebooting his career.

    I had no idea that MY LOVE PATZZI is written by Kim Yi-Young, author of sageuks HAECHI, HWAJUNG (her only other works I’ve seen), HORSE DOCTOR, DONG YI, and LEE SAN, WIND OF THE PALACE. The drama is dated, but that’s what I expected from a 2002 show that was Jang Nara’s second drama. I tuned in for Kim Jae-won and Kim Rae-won.

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Kumulipo (“Beginning-in-deep-darkness”)

That First Black Hole Seen in an Image Is Now Called Pōwehi, at Least in Hawaii
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/13/science/powehi-black-hole.html

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    Pōwehi – Part 1 of 2

    This article makes my heart flutter.

    I nearly fell out of my chair when Mr. P. brought up a news item on the naming of the first black hole ever to be imaged anywhere. How apropos that the indirect image was captured via two telescopes atop Maunakea on the Big Island of Hawai’i. Leave it to the Hawaiian language to have a term that distills the power and majesty of the enigmatic black hole into a stunning visual of the process of creation that parallels the gestation of a human being following the path of his/her ancestors.

    I can’t help but imagine that King David Kalakaua and his sister, Queen Lili’uokalani, along with folklore professor Martha Beckwith, and Mary Kawena Pukui and Samuel Hoyt Elbert, authors of The Hawaiian Dictionary, are smiling at this announcement. Manseh, Dr. Larry Kimura!

    “Pōwehi” immediately reminded me of “Po” (night) and evoked the primordial darkness out of which creation arose in the Kumulipo, the famed Hawaiian creation and genealogical chant first brought to the attention of Westerners via the translation of a fragment into German by anthropologist Adolf Bastian in 1881. Richly annotated with commentary and translated into English, The Kumulipo: A Hawaiian Creation Chant was published in 1951 by 80-year-old folklorist and ethnographer emerita Martha Warren Beckwith of Vassar College. The work compares several versions of the text and commentaries by such famed scholars as Queen Lili’uokalani, who translated this birth chant of one of her ancestors into English in 1897 while under house arrest following the coup that dethroned her. She included the kaona (hidden meanings, allusions) that suffuse all 2,000+ lines of text. In tandem with Professor Beckwith’s Hawaiian Mythology (1940), which deals with the Hawaiian and Polynesian pantheon in much greater depth and breadth, The Kumulipo is the capstone of the life’s work of the Massachusetts native who grew up in Hawaii.
    http://vcencyclopedia.vassar.edu/faculty/prominent-faculty/martha-beckwith.html

    – Continued –

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    Pōwehi – Part 2 of 2

    In my work as a translator, I consulted Dr. Beckwith’s writings to research the common threads and cognates that link with the cosmology and spiritual traditions of other Pacific cultures. I don’t like to call it “mythology,” which implies that it is not true or real. On some level of reality, ancient oral traditions may be more true than humans living in the virtual reality of the twenty-first century could ever imagine. My Celtic ancestors had their own accounts of the supernatural events and beings who exist below the surface of the visible world. Omo! Dr. Beckwith happens to have noted some of those parallels. LOL! Knock me over with a feather! Polynesian Analogues to the Celtic Other-World and Fairy Mistress Themes. New Haven, C.T.: Yale University Press, 1923. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martha_Warren_Beckwith.

    The celebrated Irish-Maori Director of Honolulu’s Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Te Rangi Hiroa aka Sir Peter Henry Buck (1877-1951), documented the material and intellectual culture of a wide range of Pacific peoples. His Arts and Crafts of Hawaii (1957) is a landmark reference work with wonderfully detailed line drawings. In The Vikings of the Sunrise (first published in French in 1952), he discusses oral genealogies, starting on page 22:
    http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/tm/scholarly/tei-BucViki-t1-body-d1-d3.html#n40

    While Asia as the birthplace of humanity was later supplanted by Africa thanks to the discoveries of Mary and Louis Leakey at Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania, in 1959, Hiroa’s comments on migration from mainland Asia into the Pacific Basin are still afloat. He discusses the peopling of the Pacific in chapter 3 of Vikings of the Sunrise, and then examines the development, design, and construction of Oceanian voyaging canoes in chapter 4.
    http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/tm/scholarly/tei-BucViki-t1-body-d1-d3.html

    Te Rangi Hiroa entry in: New Zealand Electronic Text Collection / Te Pūhikotuhi o Aotearoa, part of Victoria University of Wellington Library
    http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/tm/scholarly/name-202886.html

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Te_Rangi_H%C4%ABroa

    -30-

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    86, 230 and 345 GHz Bands – Namakanui
    https://www.eaobservatory.org/jcmt/instrumentation/heterodyne/namakanui/

    Namakanui (literally, “Big-Eyes”) is the collective name of an upgrade to the East Asian Observatory’s James Clerk Maxwell Telescope at Maunakea that was bestowed by Dr. Larry Kimura. It consists of three receivers. Each is named for a species of native fishes with large eyes:

    1. ʻAla‘ihi (“Squirrelfish”)
    https://mauioceancenter.com/educate/hawaiis-marine-life/hawaiian-squirrelfish/

    photo: Sargocentron xantherythrum (Jordan & Evermann, 1903)
    https://www.fishbase.de/summary/Sargocentron-xantherythrum.html

    2. ʻŪʻū (“Soldierfish”)
    Myripristis berndti (Jordan & Evermann, 1905)
    per Richard N. Uchida and James H. Uchiyama (editors): NOAA Technical Report NMFS 38, September 1986, Fishery Atlas of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands; U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service; pages 80-81.
    https://repository.library.noaa.gov/view/noaa/5708/noaa_5708_DS1.pdf

    photo: Myripristis berndti (Jordan & Evermann, 1903) Blotcheye soldierfish
    https://www.fishbase.de/summary/Myripristis-berndti.html

    3. ʻĀweoweo (“Big Eye”)
    Priacanthus cruentatus (Lacepède, 1802) (Fig. 50); Glasseye snapper, red bigeye, aweoweo
    per Richard N. Uchida and James H. Uchiyama (editors): NOAA Technical Report NMFS 38, September 1986, Fishery Atlas of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands; pages 83-84.

    photo: Heteropriacanthus cruentatus (Lacepède, 1801) Glasseye
    https://www.fishbase.de/Summary/SpeciesSummary.php?ID=1150&AT=aweoweo

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WHEN THE BUCKWHEAT FLOWERS BLOSSOM (1967)

Korean Classic Film – Eng. sub.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YyPKLcWwxk0

Short story here:
http://hompi.sogang.ac.kr/anthony/klt/96wint/yihyosok.htm
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    As GOBLIN informed us, buckwheat blossoms signify “lover” in the Korean language of flowers.

    Film details at Korean Movie Database:
    https://www.kmdb.or.kr/eng/db/kor/detail/movie/K/01589

    Yi Hyo-sok: “When the Buckwheat Blooms” (1936)
    Translators: Kim Chong-un & Bruce Fulton
    Korean Literature Today, vol. 1, no. 3, Winter 1996
    http://hompi.sogang.ac.kr/anthony/klt/96wint/yihyosok.htm

    “Wife,” a short story by Kim Yu-jong, author of the famous “Sonagi” (“Rain Shower”), also appears in the same issue of the literary journal. It caught my eye because “Sonagi” references pop up in Kdramas and movies such as THE CLASSIC on a regular basis. I read both short stories before watching the film, and realized that some elements of “Wife” also seem to have found their way into the movie (e.g., the peddlers singing “Arirang” in the bar is reminiscent of the story’s narrator trying to teach his wife to sing old songs so she could succeed at her intended profession as a peddler of alcoholic beverages; the cussing and bickering between peddler Cho and his pregnant wife also sounds like the dialogue of the skits and the horsing around between Gong-gil and Jang-seng in THE KING AND THE CLOWN). Maybe it’s just coincidental. In the film, I enjoyed the footage of street acrobats and musicians, and a ssireum (traditional Korean wrestling) match.

    Kim Yu-jong: “Wife” (1935)
    Translators: Kim Chong-un & Bruce Fulton
    Korean Literature Today, vol. 1, no. 3, Winter 1996
    http://hompi.sogang.ac.kr/anthony/klt/96wint/kimyujong.htm

    The preface to the story caught my eye:

    It is an inspired, uninhibited monolog, rife with scenes of domestic violence, narrated by an unlettered, sexist woodcutter who is not afraid to poke fun at himself. In bringing alive the character of his wife as well as himself, and in evoking familiar Korean ballads, this man gives us a taste of the kwangdae, the narrator of the traditional oral narrative p’ansori. Kim was a true original, and there is little else like this story in modern Korean fiction.

    In other words: This ain’t Mama Fairy’s Woodcutter!

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LOVE, LIES – OST

Chun Woo-hee: “Heart of Joseon” Eng. sub.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f0mJ9T1WwRc

Gorgeous, haunting melody. Daebak!

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LIFE AS A GIRL / JOSHI TEKI SEIKATSU, Ep. 1 BGM

Little Eva: “Loco-Motion” (1962)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eKpVQm41f8Y

https://www.songfacts.com/facts/little-eva/the-loco-motion
Original. MORE

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The Island of Sea Women

Lisa See Sets a Coming-of-Age Story in the Tumultuous Seas of Occupied Korea
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/05/books/review/island-of-sea-women-lisa-see.html

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MY FELLOW CITIZENS, Ep. 2 BGM

Die Singphoniker: “The Syncopated Clock” [Leroy Anderson] live, 2014
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8y2pFAW6iz8

Plays when police break up bar fight. (MORE)

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    There’s an interesting Korean connection to this piece of music. The ticking and tocking of the clock is scored for Buddhist temple blocks. Known as “moktak” in Korean, they are carved out of apricot wood and are struck to accompany chanting. They have appeared in HAECHI.

    I had no idea “The Syncopated Clock” has lyrics. It started out as an instrumental composed by Leroy Anderson in 1945. Tin Pan Alley lyricist Mitchell Parish wrote the lyrics in 1951. Here’s a vocal version from 1951:

    [MY FELLOW CITIZENS, Ep. 1 BGM] Tony Fontaine & Lew Douglas Orchestra & Vocal Group: “The Syncopated Clock” 1951
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cBwsKyMPyhw

    For 25 years (1950-1975), WCBS-TV in New York used the Percy Faith Orchestra’s instrumental version as the theme song for “The Late Show” that aired old movies.

    Note: The song is purposely (and playfully) syncopated only intermittently. 😉

    Among many other classics, Leroy Anderson also composed the “Blue Tango,” “Sleighride,” and “The Typewriter.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Syncopated_Clock
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leroy_Anderson
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitchell_Parish

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MY FELLOW CITIZENS, Ep. 1 BGM

Badfinger: “Without You” (No Dice LP, 1970) Original Version
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DGihfdSsrmA

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Without_You_(Badfinger_song)

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MY FELLOW CITIZENS, Ep. 1 BGM

Mariah Carey: “Without You” (Music Box, 1993)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6VY8ZxcDh1s

Plays during the cop’s breakup scene in the motel.

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MY FELLOW CITIZENS, Ep. 1 BGM

P!nk: “So What” (Funhouse, 2008) Official Music Video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FJfFZqTlWrQ

Plays when con man’s eyes meet cop’s across a crowded room.

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MY FELLOW CITIZENS, Ep. 1 BGM

[Harry] Nilsson: “Without You” (Nilsson Schmilsson LP, 1971)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8dnUv3DUP4E

Composed by Badfinger’s Pete Ham & Tom Evans. Huge hit in ’72.

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HAECHI / THE THRONE / THE SECRET DOOR – History

Review by Justin Howe:
The Memoirs of Lady Hyegyong, JaHyun Kim Haboush, translator
https://10badhabits.com/2014/03/10/memoirs-of-lady-hyegyong/

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In a land of workaholics, burned-out South Koreans go to ‘prison’ to relax, by Matt Kwong, 02/14/18
https://www.cbc.ca/news/world/south-korea-overwork-culture-jail-retreat-prison-inside-me-1.4527832

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    No thanks. I think backpacking would be a much better idea.

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      I’d like to try out the heated floor. 😉 Oh, wait. No Kdramas… I’ll have to rethink this. 😉

      As a way of withdrawing entirely from 24/7 interruptions, it sounds like a winner to me.

      When email first came into use, it was a wonderful means of communicating with people in distant time zones without having to stay up all night, and it was a lot cheaper than international phone calls. Then again, I grew up in the era of public telephone booths, before PCs, email, and instant messaging. All the new-fangled electronic media has become just as obtrusive as telemarketing did via landline phones. I remember reading of public opposition to telephones when they were first introduced in the 1890s or whenever. People were deeply concerned about invasion of privacy at home. It sounds like a quaint idea, but they had a point, and they would probably be shocked at the bombardment — and wastefulness — of junk mail in all its forms.

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Random Country

Crystal Gayle: “Don’t It Make My Brown Eyes Blue”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=udEZ_JjNz4E

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HAECHI – Historical background

King Yeongjo’s policy achievements, by Kwon Oh-yeong
https://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/nation/2018/09/628_160631.html

Glimpses of the future king appear in eps. 21-22.

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HAECHI – Historical background – Eunuchs

China’s last eunuch spills sex secrets
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-china-eunuch/chinas-last-eunuch-spills-sex-secrets-idUSTRE52E06H20090316

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    Too bad the title of the article is so sensationalized and trashy. It sheds interesting light on the desperation that motivated even young boys to choose the profession of court eunuch.

    According to this item, Sun Yaoting himself decided to become a eunuch at the age of 9 years:

    Who Was the Last Eunuch of China?
    https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/history/who-was-the-last-eunuch-of-china

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    This is just sad.

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      @thatstp,
      You said it. All the more so because it is true. And that is why I wanted to point it out. Nearly every sageuk has eunuchs in it, but does anyone ever consider the ramifications?

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        For the first year of drama watching, I didn’t know what a eunuch was. When I finally looked it up…😲 then 😢

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    So many stories regarding this topic. We certainly have no idea what really happened behind the scenes for so many.

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    As always @pakalanapikake thanks for all your research. I might as well ask here rather in the recaps.
    Since Yi Geum was named Crown Prince (Seja) and now has a Royal Residence wouldn’t he have a Eunuch or Eunuchs in his service. He needs his own Eunuch Jo (TCC) if you will. If he did he would have have a source of information that might be really helpful. In can remember in another sageuk, maybe GRAND PRINCE, a child prince had a child eunuch (I think) as a companion. Perhaps I am thinking of GP’s Lee Hwi and Gi-teuk.

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HAECHI – Historical background – Eunuchs

The Death of the Last [Chinese] Emperor’s Last Eunuch (1996)
https://www.nytimes.com/1996/12/20/world/the-death-of-the-last-emperor-s-last-eunuch.html

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    As @lollypip mentioned in her comments on episodes 21-22, life in Joseon was brutal, and HAECHI pulls some punches. One institution that is usually glossed over in Kdramas is the use of eunuchs in the palace, a practice adopted from China. In the film MASQUERADE, Ha Sun had a brief conversation about the subject, which I had hoped would be addressed in CROWNED CLOWN. Alas, it was not. I think it could have been done in a manner suitable for 15-year-old TV audiences. If anything would drive home just how difficult life was for the people on the lowest rungs of society during Joseon and earlier dynasties, that would be it.

    It’s all too easy to use the term “eunuch” without considering how a certain segment of the population became that way. Maybe it was such an integral part of Korean culture for so long that no one thinks twice about it nowadays — unless they are international viewers from lands that did not have this practice.

    For all the horrors awaiting Korean females sent as tribute to China, an even more grisly fate lay in store for all too many Korean males.

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      There was one kdrama that focused on eunuchs. It was called, “King and I” (or, “The Eunuch”). I watched it on tv many years ago and didn’t get to see the first few episodes. The protagonist becomes a eunuch both to be near and to protect the woman he loves, who has been married to the King). It is true that most dramas do not focus on this group of people. It was surely a traumatizing event to go through the process of complete castration (I believe that was how it was done in East Asia, at least in China). I also know that people became eunuchs for a variety of reasons, but what choice was there for children sent to the palace? In Italy, there were the Castrati, young boys castrated (but only partially) in order to preserve their voices. They were used by the Catholic Church. Parents would chose this path for their boys for the usual reasons. The ironic thing was that, while this procedure was done to maintain a certain quality of voice, that desired quality was not guaranteed. The last living castrato, for example, did not have a particularly exceptional voice. Throughout history, these kinds of things happened all too frequently. Men/boys could be castrated in times of war or in order to safeguard a living.

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        @peridot,

        THE KING AND I with Oh Man-seok in the title role has been on my to-watch list for quite a while. One of these days…

        East Asia certainly doesn’t have a corner on the eunuch market. The Ottoman Empire institutionalized it to an immense degree as well.

        The ironically sad thing about castrati was they were maimed so they could sing the parts that naturally lay in women’s vocal ranges — thanks to institutional misogyny within the Church. (Why couldn’t they have had nuns sing at Mass?!?) Back then in medieval Europe, as in Joseon, male actors played female roles in the theatre as well because the profession was considered to be scandalous for decent women. Or the good ole boys were keeping all the fun to themselves.

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          “East Asia certainly doesn’t have a corner on the eunuch market.”

          Very true!

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          @peridot,

          Re: “Why couldn’t they have had nuns sing at Mass?!?”

          I read somewhere that St. Paul’s dictum that women not open their mouths in church was the basis for their not being allowed to sing. I’ve long had a bone to pick with his misogyny.

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Forget Self-Driving Cars. Bring Back the Stick Shift.
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/23/opinion/sunday/stick-shift-cars.html

I’ve never owned an automatic. Five on the floor or bust.

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