Beanie level: Entertainer-in-training

I’ve succumbed to the peer pressure: Untamed ep 1-5 done. It’s only because my hubby is on a business trip and I have nothing better to do. I’ll save you any gifs or screenshots though. But the more mature, stoic lead is only fracking 22-years-old! How is that even possible? It’s like when I first saw Yoo Jin-Goo in Jackpot/The Royal Gambler and thought he was 30-years-old and he was like 18. 😳

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    During my first watch, I had a hard time getting through the first few episodes but wow, you finished 5 already!

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      I was watching it while finishing up charts for work and the episodes (after ep 1) are all less than an hour. It zipped along quicker that I expected. I had seen half of the first episode several weeks ago with my husband and he didn’t want to continue, so I was able to skip that too. I’ll probably be able to get another 5 done today as my kids will be at a fall party tonight. And then my husband comes back home and I’ll be watching MY COUNTRY again. It may be a couple more weeks before I get to watch this again (when he goes on another trip). I intermittently binge watch, I guess!

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        You’ll get past the slower parts soon then. It was really hard for me to not press the play button for the episodes after that. 😉

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    I began watching 2-3 weeks ago… I’m only at the beginning of Episode 8 😅😅😅

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    Ahh! Yay you started The Untamed! WYB is pretty freaking awesome! 💕

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    Welcome to The Untamed Club! I struggled with the first few eps, sat on the fence over the next few and at some point and fell into the rabbit hole. Hang on @ally-le it gets better and better!

    WYB was only 20 when he started filming The Untamed, he celebrated his 21st birthday on set.

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      Well, that’s not any better. 😆 I’m terrible at guessing ages of Asian actors in shows. These shows have them acting so much older that their real age. I guess it’s a testament to their skill though! I always think to myself that if my mom had me when she was 20, I could easily be this guy’s (and YJG’s) mother in another life (which is crazy).

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        I googled both leads before I started the drama. I thought he’s gonna be the typical idol actor plus he looked like totally a kiddo to me. I was so wrong.

        If you get into this drama, you will get to enjoy all the awesome BTS that comes with it.

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          Like the BTS of how Xiao Zhan chased poor Wang Yibo around with a ‘cute’ bug on his birthday. They are like brothers 🤣

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    Yay! It may be too early but… welcome to Suibian/Untamed Beanies Club! 🐇🐓

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    It’s crazy that the one who acts younger is 6 years older then the one who acts older. They both did a phenomenal job though. They both became their characters for me. I couldn’t see anyone else in their roles.

    But the first few episodes are confusing. Then they are a little slow as they establish the characters and world and then the obsession hits. I started getting addicted around ep. 15 and then I just got more and more obsessed as the drama progressed.

    Hope you enjoy it and welcome!

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      It is! Which I actually feel better about. He’s adorable!

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My Country: A HELLUVA LOT happens in the second episode—it’s like a movie. I have no idea where this story is going because it feels like we’ve gotten past the 11th episode on most dramas. Pics for proof. #directionstorytellingactingallonpoint #therewasakissbutnotthemostshockingthing

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    And I cried no less than three times this episode.

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    I love the camerawork in this one too. The kiss was so well done. I like when the camera is off center and something is in front of you and the action on screen. Like you’ve peaked into a really intimate moment. Love that.

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    I’m already lamenting the fact that I haven’t watched the second episode! (The usual time issues, yet, I’m on the Beanie wall!!) I don’t want to fall behind!!

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      It’s better than the first one!!! It just keeps building and getting better and better. It zips along at a fast gallop and doesn’t look back. I was so affected by the end that I had to go back and watch the beginning to remind me what it was like before the end. I wasn’t ready for everything that happened. If anything, the pacing was too fast for me. I expected more exposition on the characters. But I liked it still!!!

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    We know it’s headed for total heartbreak for everyone, including the viewers. Who will she wind up with? Who will take care of his sister?

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The litmus test I use to know of a sageuk is good is if it can make me cry the first episode. I bawled this first episode of My Country. And it’s GORGEOUS. GORGEOUS, I tell you!

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    I only made it a few seconds into the intro before I had some bad Arthdal flashbacks. This looks nothing like Arthdal though, so I’ll give it another try.

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      @ndlessjoie It’s not like Arthdal ….. this one has better lighting so you don’t need night-vision goggles to watch it!

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      I’m already on live with cast—al of them. The veteran actors are all amazing too!

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    This is not going to be a happy story for our trio, is it.

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      My heart is ready to be broken and mended and broken and (hopefully) mended again! I love all these actors already. I believe I’m their stories already. I’m all in!

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      That’s why I usually don’t make it through an entire saguek. I don’t want to watch the inevitable ending.

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    @ally-le The scenes are gorgeous indeed. I think this is going to be a good one.

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Pretty sure there’s a chaebol living across the street from me. #sonthoughtsomeonedied #themeofthemonth?
#notahearse

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    please send out my contact information. The more tsundere the chaebol is, the better.

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      Lol. I really have no idea who lives there. I may be giving your name to a serial killer or mob boss for all you know!

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    Prom?

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      Prom is at the end of the school year. It’s a Thursday night too. I’d say homecoming, but I that’s usually on Friday night. Also, no teenagers live in this house. I’ve never actually seen the people who live there. They just moved in less than a year ago.

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    hmmm tinted windows and huge space big enough for a coffin… vampire?

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      (plus no one’s seen the neighbours at all)

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Everyone do yourself a favor and listen to this. You can thank me later… #akmunewrelease

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#makjangmondays, from my own vault…which I’m scared to even put here, but I have theory that must be borne out…

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    I wasn’t at all interested in him. But I was a TA in a chemistry class for the summer and he was in it. Somehow I caught his eye and kept asking me out. Coffee, tea, a movie. I always said I was busy. We finally happened to meet at a French film on campus, serendipitously, I thought. He was with a girl-friend, whom I assumed was a girlfriend. We all talked for a while, longer than I would allowed myself without a third party involved. He asked me out again, and against my better judgement, I said yes. (It was swing dancing and I couldn’t say no to that. I love dancing. Why I love my dancing Kpop groups.). And I assumed it was just “as friends.”

    It was a fun night. I met some fun girls at the place we went and as I was the “unnie,” I was able to give them some advice about love and loss, entirely ignorant of what I was doing that night.

    We went to a late night diner for dinner.

    We talked a long time. I don’t even remember about what exactly, amnesia due to the shock I got later…

    He was older, about 4-5 years than I. Went back to school after finishing a military commitment. His life wasn’t easy, but through a scholarship, found himself at a liberal arts school attended by lots of chaebols, those with means, and me. And that girl I met was not his girlfriend, just some there to scope me out, to make sure I was normal.

    I still had no idea I was on a date, really.

    He then told me about the son and the ex-wife with whom he still lived.

    I don’t know what I looked like when he dropped those bombs. I’m sure I turned some ashen shade. I was a novice in dating and being innocent was an understatement. Suffice it to say, I politely listened to the rest of the story of his life and bowed out. I’m pretty sure I drove myself there and drove myself back home.

    You’d think this would be the end.

    Unfortunately, it was not.

    How difficult was it to avoid him? Turned out, really difficult. But I did for several days, pretty talented of me as I was still the TA in his chemistry lab.

    I met up with an older girl friend from another school at a bookstore several days or even weeks later and recounted the entire story, leaving out no details.

    As I was ending my tirade, who should pop out from behind a bookshelf, but the divorcee in question and his son!

    And again, I turned ashen.

    I graduated and came back for an interview for the school a year later. The interview was in the library and who should be there studying? You all guessed it.

    I don’t even remember his name, but I remember his son’s name for whatever reason, and that he is probably about 25 years old now.

    I’ve not uttered this story to anyone in 20 years, because of how marvelously it imploded, but I’m sure even now, someone here is this person or his son, our maybe even his ex-wife. Because that’s my life.

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      Are you sure he still keeps track of you? Chills…

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        I don’t know but the second I think of him, or say a thing about him, he shows up.

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          But he hasn’t shown up in 20 years, right? 😬 And your theory is that he (or his) will show up now because of you telling the story? Don’t worry, that’s not your life! And anyway, Mr. Dr. Ally can kick his ass.

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            Not that I know of. And yes, my hubby is quite intimidating when he wants to be😆.

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      Oooof the creepy side of makjang

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      *shudder* the creepy side of makjangs for real!!!

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      WOW. That’s crazy. I’m happy you got out of it safely in the end.

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        The stupid things I did in college. I was smart enough to to take my own car though.

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    Holy moly that is creepy!

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Here’s your obligatory foodie post from our trip to see Day6! And ironically, I saw coconut Melonas, but couldn’t make the trip 7 hours home with them to try, @sicarius And Ranch99, I’ve missed you so!!!

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Day6 was amazing! Jae was like 10 ft from me! And bowed! Great concert! The energy in that room—crazy.

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    Glad you had an awesome time!

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    Glad to know it was great!

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    I was there! They were amazing as always. So so good. 😍

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      Where were you sitting? Did you do that hi/touch thing? I didn’t get tickets in time to get those, but the girl I was sitting next to and her friend did. We should have hung around for a bit to see what that was like, but I’m old and hubby was hungry! I hope you enjoyed yourself! I may have convinced my husband to go to another one in the future! The energy was just amazing. There were so many things that I thought I knew about kpop concerts that I was totally wrong about. For some reason I thought there would be majority Koreans there, totally mistaken. I think I say no more than about a dozen Koreans I saw—-there were probably more, but the majority were not. Also, not as many Asians as I thought there would be. The girl I sat next to was Hispanic. There was a cute girl and her dad across the isle from us. It was so cool to see people across racial and ethnic divides all singing in Korean. It was impressive. I know all the melodies, but not all the words, but there were people that knew all the words—and I’m sure they weren’t Korean. It was unlike anything I’ve ever experienced. Definitely worth the effort getting there.

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        No, I didn’t get to do the Hi-Touch either! Maybe one day I’ll spend the extra money. Haha. I did have pretty good P3 seats though. I was in the front of the second section on the left side, but that whole venue was nice compared to others I’ve been in since it sloped and no one had to stand on tip-toes to see! I saw them last year as well and they haven’t disappointed yet! They are so fun to watch and full of energy. They know how to get the crowd excited as well without going overboard (I have a friend who saw a different group and said the crowd wouldn’t even let them talk due to all the screaming). I love seeing the diversity as well – it’s always too cute to see dads there with their daughters. 😀 I don’t know the Korean lyrics either – I just pop in wherever English is and hum along! I thought it was hilarious that they have and English version of Congratulations, but everyone still tried to sing in Korean. I hope they come again next year!

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    Ofc course it was amazing day6 is amazing day6 is everything.

    Im glad you had fun!

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T-48 hours kpop fans! #day6indallas

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I’m the resident kdrama expert in my clinic, and after getting my respiratory therapist hooked (Mr. Sunshine was her gateway), my secretary just asked me for recommendations of cdramas and kdramas!

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To welcome @azzo1 back to DB, I’m reminding the old and introducing the new Beanies to “Oppawars” the first real fan wall drama. http://www.dramabeans.com/members/kudoran/activity/193454/#acomment-193455

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Makjang with a happy ending.

@hotcocoagirl’s makjang just reminded me of some hospital drama I was part of that was all makjang, but turned out quite alright. I just want to put that out there, since my last submission was all too horrifying. It was the Taco Bell PPL reference that reminded me, so here is my next submission for #makjangmonday.

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    I was a fellow at a university hospital. I was a little older than my co-fellows as I did a 4 year military service commitment after medical school, when most of them went straight into fellowship. It was there that I befriended several other doctors doing further subspecialty training and one that I became good friends with. He was from a Hispanic family, also a first generation American. I’m going to call him Juan here (although his real name is so much cooler). We were both married, but my husband would always tease that Juan was my “work husband” because we watched out for each other, went to lunch together, and just spent a lot of time together at work. I was his emotional support during fellowship. I didn’t know it at the time, but that’s what I ended up being. I’m sure there were rumors about us in that hospital, but it was what it was.

    His wife was a first generation Indian-American (don’t you just love America?) but was doing an extended residency in a nearby town, and he only saw her (and as he called it, had conjugal visits) on weekends. And with the craziness of her surgical residency, he really didn’t talk to her much during the week. I met her once. I invited the department to my house for a pool party and he brought her. You know how you meet a couple and you think, “How did they end up together?” She tall and model-esque. She was probably 2 inches taller than he was. Juan was just average height, maybe a little shorter than average. I won’t disparage my friend, but when I met him, he reminded me of a frog with glasses. Kind of like if you kissed him, he might turn into a handsome prince. He was funny, engaging, and really very sweet and thoughtful. He would tell me about her, their sex life, everything, and I knew he adored her.

    One of our quick lunch stops was Taco Bell. I think that’s where we first met and talked actually. We would walk there and back to the hospital together 2-3x/week and I would have the meximelt and he would have the bean burrito. He talked about cars, a lot. I could speak “car” because my husband likes cars too. He was so excited that day because he had finished building his wife a car for her birthday. It was an adorable MG that even I was impressed with. He and his brothers had spent the better part of a year rehabbing it. He was actually leaving work early and surprise her with it. (I told you he was sweet.)

    So, one guess as to what happens next…

    He had gone to the house she was staying, a house that she was renting a room from a doctor whose family lived there as well. They had a son in college who was home for the summer. And Juan (dear, sweet, thoughtful, frog-prince-in-disguise, Juan) walked in on his wife and this son of the doctor.

    He called me in tears. I told him to drive back to town—in her car.

    My husband took him out until late that night. I still had kids to take care of.

    He sold her car and a year elapsed.

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      Juan and I were working in our cubicles, maybe there were other fellows there, but I just remember his conversation. “What do you think about that new nurse?” he asked me. “Umm, I think she’s pretty nice. Wait, do you like her?” “I’m going to ask her out, I think.” “Really?” I’m really dumfounded at this point. Because for the past year, I’d only listened to him bemoan his failed marriage; he never thought he’d be divorced. (His wife had asked several times if he would stay with her. She ended up fired from her residency for inappropriate behavior.) And Mary the nurse, I’ll call her, had been all but throwing herself at Juan since she had arrived. And after reading @hotcocoa’s account of nurses she’s worked with, you can imagine what I was thinking. “She’s cute, I guess.”

      He really liked her. And from what he would tell me (which was probably more than I should have known) she really liked him too. At least she knew what a great guy he was. Several of our co-fellows worried that she was too controlling because she had to keep dibs on who he was with, where he was, and how long he’d be gone. But as Juan told me, she told him that she knew what a great catch he was and knew there would be other women wanting him. (To which I was like, maybe?) Who do you think was enemy #1? You guessed it. ME. So no more Taco Bell dates or hanging out with my husband and me, unless she was there.

      I went to their wedding. It was a smallish affair, his second wedding. (His first was a 3-day traditional Indian extravaganza.). It was mainly family, and us co-fellows and attendings with whom he worked. I hoped he’d be happy and that she wouldn’t hurt him, but she was kind of a bridezilla, and I had my doubts. I had really stopped being an emotional crutch for him at this point. And Mary liked me better that way as well.

      They’ve been married for 7 years now with four girls that includes a set twins who were just born this year! And they are all princesses! I send them baby shower gifts every time they have a child. I’m more than happy for Juan right now. His makjang really turned into a fairy tale ending, and I turned out to be the random supportive friend.
      (Maybe Nam-woo in “A Poem a Day.” Well, I didn’t have an alligator, but Juan was my “frog” for a while.)

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        Yay! Phew, I was really worried for him for a while there …

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        Juan sounds like a cool guy. Glad he found someone to be happy with.

        I have to admit, a lot of the story I was distracted by the fact that two doctors ate Taco Bell, which is possibly the worst food on the planet.

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          Do you know what residents and fellows get paid? Peanuts, that’s what. It’s basically free labor if you added up how many hours we actually worked.

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          And it was only because our fellows’ offices faced the Taco Bell and it was really a 5minute walk from our office there and back. It was closer than the cafeteria, which we would eat at as well. One conversation I remember having with him in the cafeteria was that he had just bought stock in FORD who didn’t take the government bail out and its stocks were low. I wonder how his stocks are doing now? Probably well.

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        Ah so glad he is happy now! You had me worried 🙂

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        I don’t know if it was actually that surprising when the affair reveal came but I gasped on cue anyway.

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        When makjang monday started i made a random makjang story in my mind. I’m more than surprised reading this because the guy protagonist in my mind was a doctor and was cheated on. How i wish such things don’t happen to real people but *gasp* they do. Well i am really glad it turned out well for him.

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        Sigh… I want to be happy for Juan, and I am, but do you know how many times us single nurses are asked if we are looking to snag a doctor? Because heck no. I respect doctors a great deal, but there is a whole hierarchy and power imbalance there that just makes the idea of dating a doc you work with seem horribly icky to me.

        I guess it’s like the secretary dating their boss trope, a lot has to happen to make me okay with that.

        Hehe, I’m honestly very happy you too enjoyed Taco Bell PPL when broke.

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          I know several doctor-nurse couples. It all depends on how they meet that takes the “ick” factor out of it for me. If they meet before the nurse is the doctor’s subordinate, I’m ok with that. Juan was a fellow. We were were only higher than med students and residents; nurses could make or break you at that stage. I had some that I was definitely intimidated by during training!

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            Ooh, gotcha. My only time at a teaching hospital was as a nursing student, when we were pretty darn low on the totem pole.

            And I agree about the “when they meet” part being key, I guess my two years of experience has only really seen a couple of icky situations which only end with someone hurt…

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          Ha – so my mini makjang story is this situation exactly: My uncle left his wife (mom of my cousins and his two adult kids) for one of the nurses in his office. It was so shady and no one has filled me in on the details, but I assume they were having an affair.

          It’s been 22 years and his first wife can’t let go. Granted, she wasn’t always a saint either, but they also got married when she was like 17, had 2 kids in quick succession and were married for probably 20ish years. It really doesn’t surprise me as an adult that it broke down so spectacularly. Also, wife no. 2 is pretty much your standard makjang evil second wife/stepmother (only not grossly young – actually, she’s probably more age appropriate for my uncle). Granted there are a lot more shades to the story but I only know bits and pieces because no one talks about it.

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            That’s pretty makjang. I hope your uncle is happy, at least.

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            I love my family as rule (unless they don’t deserve it) but my uncle really tries me. I may write a Makjang Monday post about the politics of my father’s family. It’s as complicated as any chaebol family, but with less designer clothing and more passive-aggression. We recently had a get together and I was reminded as to why we only do this every few years or so. They are almost unilaterally all terrible in one way or another.

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      I like that nearly all these #MakjangMonday stories have a time-jump! 😄

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Makjang Mondays, 9/11 edition.

What I\’ve written may be sensitive to some. Reader discretion is advised.

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    Makjang Mondays, 9/11 edition.

    “What were you doing on 9/11?” is what my daughter asked me today. “You mean, 9/11, 9/11?” I asked her a little bit shocked. “Yeah…” she replied.

    I was in med school, in orthopedic clinic, working, and your dad was paging me all morning. It was the first real fight we had, because I never answered his page. We weren’t married yet. The nurses were all asking us (the attending, resident and me) if we had heard the news of a plane crashing into one of the twin towers. I thought they meant a single engine plane, just imagining the poor guy that lost control of his little plane and hit a building. I had no idea it was a commercial liner with hundreds of people on it. It didn’t seem like a big deal and I didn’t have anything that I could reference at the time to see what happened. We were WORKING. Then a secretary told us another plane hit the other building. I still didn’t grasp the gravity of the situation. Clinic was finally over for the morning and I went to the student lounge where there were a half dozen of my colleagues surrounding the TV.
    “Are you guys watching a movie?” I asked, ignorantly.
    “No, this is real, and happening right now.” someone said.
    It was then that the first tower collapsed.
    It was then that I called your dad.
    It was then that I heard him yell at me for the first time.
    “Where are you? Why didn’t you call me back? Do you know what’s going on? Are you ok?”
    I said I was fine. And he told he how worried he was that I wasn’t okay, that the world was falling apart and that no one was safe anymore.
    I spent the next two hours glued to that TV in the student lounge. No one said a word. We saw things that no one should ever see. That’s what I was doing.

    “My teacher said you would remember.”
    “It was really traumatic for everyone. That’s why she said that.”

    Real life is frequently stranger than fiction. This day in history is wonderfully makjang, tragically makjang, and irrevocably makjang. Parents woke up and left their children, never to return back to them, children went to daycare, never to return home, first responders went to their last call, cooks, housekeepers, business people, teachers, so many lights extinguished that day. The world wasn’t the same after that, and we are still suffering from the fall out. Beanies, the world can change in a second, so hug your loved-ones, be good to those around you, and live your lives to the fullest!

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      I remember when the second plane hit and then I knew, oh god. Everything just changed. Until then you could still think the first one had been a small plane’s accident. An NBC person saw it just after it happened and called straight to The Today Show (live on air) where she tried to describe it but Matt Lauer said something like, oh no I’m sure it wasn’t a full size airliner. She kept insisting that it really was. That whole little story has been edited out of all the 9-11 shows.

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        Matt Lauer, when he was respectable, another makjang story there.

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          IKR? 🙄 I thought the same thing as I typed that.

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      I was too young to remember any of it, but as I learned of it I knew one thing: the world has changed since then. And what’s sad is I’m not being dramatic. Distrust, fear. Racism. Stigmatization. War. LOSS. Long gone are the days where you don’t need to lock the doors of your home.

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        I am old enough to remember that day – and I want to say, respectfully, I don’t fully agree with your assessment.

        Distrust, fear, racism, stigmatization were all here before the towers fell. US History in the 90s alone is full of it (off the top of my head: OJ SImpson, Rodney King/LA Riots, Don’t ask, don’t tell). The only difference is that after there were more targets for these behaviors, and the excuse to hate was “patriotism”.

        As one of the group which the hate was aimed towards (I’m Muslim) it opened my eyes to the injustices to all the communities that had lived with that hate aimed at them for generations. It’s part of why I do what I do (I’m a civil rights attorney) – we are a country that needs to root out the distrust, fear, racism and stigmatization that is part of our collective subconscious.

        And I don’t mean to lecture or berate you. understand and respect where you’re coming from. I just think that idealizing the “before” is another way to diminish those who already knew that those behaviors were a part of what this country is about.

        As for loss and war – the Bush administration was going to invade Iraq regardless of 9/11. They were just handed an excuse to do so and exploited the tragedy. But that’s another conversation.

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          Thank you for the clarification!! You are right. and I feel like i should delete my comment. Im honestly too young to know the state before and after and apologize if i offended anyone.

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            No – don’t feel bad. And I’m not offended. I just think that getting too comfortable with the “before and after” narrative can be problematic. I wanted to point it out because I think a lot of people make that distinction and it doesn’t move the conversations we need to have forward. And by no means is my point of view the only one either. I just wanted to point out that idealizing “before” can cause (inadvertent) erasure of the problems that have been with this country from its inception.

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        Actually, where I am, we still can forget to lock our doors. I was talking to a African American Marine who just moved here who grew up in south Chicago. Keep in mind that my town has no minorities, not even African Americans, and I asked him if he thought this town was racist. He said no, that people are just ignorant and a lot are just curious. He gets a lot of people staring at him and his family when they go out. But said that he left his garage door open all night one night and no one took anything when he realized it the next morning! I said that was pretty normal around here! We know all our neighbors and would call each other if we saw something suspicious. I’m pretty lucky to live where I do.

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      I was still at school at the time, and the reaction was the same as we watched it on TV: disbelief, horror, shock that the world as we knew it was falling apart. Yes, the world can change in a second. Thank you for the reminder to cherish our loved ones and our lives to the fullest while we can @ally-le!

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      My children were very young at that time, and I tried to keep the images off television when they were home and awake, but this was very difficult.

      The day of the attack was horrific. My husband was out of town on a business trip in South Dakota, working almost around the clock. But as much as I had tried to shield my kids from the worst, and to make them not be as scared and uncertain as we all were, one of my daughters asked me question a few days later that gutted me. “Was Dad on one of the planes?” She had been thinking he was on one of those planes for days, and never said anything. Possibly one of my worst moments as a mom to be honest.

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        You thought you were protecting her innocence. That was not your fault. But kids just know things.

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        I wasn’t as lucky. I’ll never forget how the teacher rolled the TV into the classroom and made us watch it for the entire hour. I was not in the US at the time. It wasn’t a pleasant experience as some kids low-key cheered that the US got what it deserved, though the majority were just as shocked as I was. But I was young, so some things were engraved more strongly in my mind, and passing comments by ignorant kids affected me so much that I was never fully able to identify with that culture anymore.

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          To me, that’s the biggest change caused by 9-11, Americans realizing there was a world full of people who didn’t totally love us. If you didn’t travel and didn’t read much (or didn’t have a strong ethnic background with ties to “the old country”) it was still possible to believe that the world loved the US and everyone wanted to be an American. On 9-10. Like your schoolmates, once that second plane hit I kept thinking our chickens had come home to roost.

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      I was ten at the time, and my dad worked in DC. The Pentagon had been hit too, so my mom spent hours trying to get a hold of my dad to see if he was okay (thankfully, he was fine). We went over to my grandmother’s, since we didn’t have cable, to watch the news. Interestingly, that happened to be one of the only times in my life where I kept a diary, so I have a diary entry for that day from my 10-year-old self.

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        Yes, I remember that too. I had a friend who worked with the CIA, and I was worried Langley would get hit. It’s amazing not more people were hurt that day at the Pentagon. And amazing that the last plane was crashed in a field before getting to the White House. Those passengers were true heroes that day. I’m glad your father was okay. That must have been harrowing for your mom.

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          Yes, those passengers were incredible. I can’t even begin to imagine what that was like for them.
          Thanks. My mom handled it well, I’m sure for my brother’s and my sake, but I know she was terrified.

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      I was in fourth grade when it happened. I remember the teachers being upset and watching the television discreetly. I remember my mom telling me something bad had happened and being glued to the tv. But somehow, I didn’t get it, I didn’t understand what was going on, I don’t remember none of it clearly and for this I am so grateful. Even as a child, I suffered with anxiety and panic attacks that it impacted my health. It wasn’t until I was older that I saw the footage and heard the stories, and it still shook me up a little were I just was out of it for a few days. It’s definitely a day we will never forget, but for my sanity, it’s good that I don’t remember it as it was happening.

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        That’s another thing that changed that day, we started having CNN on all the time because you just couldn’t stop watching.

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      I remember my mom waking me up and saying that the US was under attack.
      Then just having the tv on for the around the clock coverage, it was ABC with Peter Jennings mostly.
      When he became I’ll and passed away a few years later I just remembered how he was such a steady presence at that time.
      It gives me chills still when I think about it.

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        I do have to say I dont think it is makjang at all. At least the definition I have for that genre.

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          It’s makjang purely in the fact of how unbelievable the situation was. No one could believe it happened.

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      I remember it as the day the world changed for the worst. Racism and discrimination was alive and well still but what happened later to people who had nothing in common with the terrorist except for the way they addressed their God felt the biggest blow. I am not saying all the lives lost and all those horrible scenes we saw unfolding on tv was trivial. My god I am not saying that. People who post their loved ones suffered and people who lost no one in that incident is still suffering. I am a Muslim and I don’t wear the hijab or look like one but I see fear in the eyes of my community and loathing and hatred in the eyes of other communities.

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      I was a student back then and I don’t remember much of the details now but I do remember the anxiety it brought to people around me. I wasn’t even in the US. I can just imagine how it was for you. It gives me chills just reading your account. It’s different from watching the news. When people talk about experiences, it feels more genuine.

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        It was a chilling time. The White House, Capitol and State Department buildings were all evacuated and there was a lot of talk about government leaders being whisked off to secret bunkers. All planes were grounded nationwide and for about 5 days the world was so quiet with no planes flying over. Except occasionally a pair of military planes would zoom by, which was quite unsettling.

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      Listening to others’ experiences of 9/11 send chills down my spine. I’m glad you and the Beanies who commented on here are safe. I was still a kid living in Vietnam, and when it happened, it was nighttime there and my dad drove us around trying to buy special edition newspapers to read up on the news. I didn’t fully understand the extent of the events. My parents were horrified for my dad’s family, most of whom lived around DC. They were also worried that our immigration process would be delayed further, considering what happened. They were right. It took almost another decade before we finally set foot on the US. *sending all the Beanies hugs*

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      I was working from home when my other half called me to ask if I was watching it. So I switched on the TV and saw the second plane hit, and I pretty much didn’t leave the room for the rest of the day. I was scanning the news all the time, not being able to look away. It felt like an addiction, reading every detail, listening to every story. I think I ended up mildly depressed from absorbing it too much, from not being able to tear myself away from the painful stories.

      I couldn’t stop (even though I knew it was unhealthy) until I went to a friend’s wedding, with a very small number of guests because a lot of the people from the States had not wanted to fly over to Europe. My other half and I spent a week in Italy without a TV and without internet, and that was what I needed to get my emotions back to some sort of normality.

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    Well, ally I am sorry, this to me is no makjang!
    This is a real sensitive issue and requires more than just reader discretion. There are lot among us who’s countries are at war and many of who’s friends relatives and families have died in attacks like 9/11, which was not makjang to anyone involved. To call such an incident makjang , even tragic makjang is some thing which really offends me. Also to all those who have to lock doors after it, terrorists and robbers are different. And if that was the only thing that changed in your life consider yourself lucky. Many people who died there would have had locked their house doors. And all those who die in many other countries such attacks also do lock their door. If you found out that people hate your country from such things, what about Afghanistan? More than 100s of civilain peoples die there in every report of attack I hear. If this is majkang to you, I am sorry I will take offense. This lead to a real war. And wars are not makjang! Please be sensitive to people who have for no good reason, other than randomly being born in a country which you still can’t choose, or being at the some place at some time have lost their lifes. And be grateful that you did not have to run at the sound of air raid siren into the bunker many died building!

    I don’t want to grate you for it, but I want some of you think before you post such things and then post really insensitive privileged comments about it. If you don’t know something, please first learn about what it means for there to be a war at your home and what it means to have some one died without you ever knowing why it so happened! It is not some accident!

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      I’m sorry to offend you, I knew some would be.

      According to javabeans: “The term makjang comes from a Korean phrase indicating a story that pushes things to the very last scene—that is to say, goes for the utter limit in terms of plot, emotion, manipulation, realism. It pushes things to (or past) our boundaries of normal behavior to elicit extreme reactions.” Strictly from this definition, war and all the autocracies you describe of war would fit. Unfortunately, in real life, such situations are tragic (see @leetennant‘s submission for Makjang Monday). You would not wish these situations on your worst enemy, whoever it might be. It’s designed to elicit strong emotions and extreme reactions, which 9/11 does, unfortunately. But we all have different points of views, don’t we? This thread is from the mainly from the view of those that saw it unfold from afar, and it still held great traumatic memories. It’s only greater for those who were firsthand witnesses. I guess some back story on my own history may help and also how 9/11 affected my future.

      My parents are immigrants, from Vietnam, and escaped when Saigon fell to the Viet Cong. Their escape was harrowing as was their lives during the war. They lived through the Vietnam War, just barely, but that’s why I’m here in the US, very lucky indeed. My parents have told me stories that you describe, of bombs and bombers, escaping towns and villages by the skin of their teeth, with just the clothes on their back, chemical and traditional warfare playing out in front of their eyes, not on television or far away, but literally, in their back yards. Escaping to the US and writing desperately of home to make sure their friends and family were still alive, and not hearing from anyone for years, and crying when that first letter came, that they were alive or word that some had died.

      It was this, the sacrifices that I witnessed from immigrant parents, that made me over-achieve where my birth and parenting should have led me, and also what made me join the US Air Force while in college, to be involved in the country that took us in, to show my appreciation to all those soldiers that helped my own family escape. You see, I was in the Air Force reserves as was my husband when 9/11 happened. We joined when the US was at peace, with no active wars to fight, so when those towers fell, we knew it would no longer be that way. One of the reasons my husband was so distraught was because our futures were now in the hands of the US government and that future included going to war. Future me on active duty waited weeks and months on end with 2 children under 2 to see if my husband or I would be in the “bucket” to deploy to Afghanistan, future me working overnight and not seeing my family we were shorthanded and short-staffed, future me caring for families that lost their father to a roadside bomb, future me that almost broke because of the fall out from war. My military days were the hardest…

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        I’ve ever had to endure, and whether or not war would have happened regardless of 9/11 is a mute point, because we knew it would definitely happen after the events of 9/11.

        But why do we tell these over-the-top, unbelievable, emotionally manipulative makjang stories? Because we all need a connection to each other and humanity and an emotional one is one of the strongest. I already feel closer to some Beanies, knowing we had the same feelings seeing these events unfold together, but so far apart.

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          Sorry to jump in but Ally, reading this makes me teared up. I’ve always heard of stories of wartime from my parents and grandparents, generations before me who have to witness such atrocities. These family’s stories, through repeated tellings and eventual polishings (adding comedic touches to otherwise tragic moments), lost some of the emotional punches to me. At the same time, I understand that telling stories and re-wiring some of the components of such stories are ways to cope and process. Idk if any of that makes sense but just want to say, thank you for sharing your story with us. 💛

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            I completely understand. I’ve heard my mother’s first hand account a couple times, and it’s hard to hear it. Also, it’s a story that happened to so many, just a little different in terms of when and where and in the little details of loss. It’s easy to become hardened so that you can deal with it. But humor is good! Your family sounds amazing!

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    Hey! Could I be left off this list? I’m not super active on db right now. Thanks! I will keep reading though!

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      No problem! I’ll take you off on the next post I write. You might still be on others though!

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Romantic Dr. Teacher Kim second season news! I can totally see this couple. But I’m still super partial to the original! https://www.soompi.com/article/1351177wpp/lee-sung-kyung-to-reportedly-take-on-leading-role-in-season-2-of-romantic-doctor-kim

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Stop the presses! My mom is FINALLY watching Goblin! So I just rewatched Ep. 4, probably one of the strongest episodes and the one that hooked me. It starts with Goblin and Reaper trying to figure out if Eun Tak should live with them, revisiting Nam Da-Reum as he goes to the afterlife (buckets of tears, again!), an adorable drunk Gong Yoo, a makjang soap’s reveal, the ghost posse, and the poem that made my heart stop. @egads, they go to Quebec the second time in this episode! A must watch before you go!

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    The cute ghost girls.

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      I’d forgotten how much I liked them! I love this episode, probably my favorite episode of any drama.

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    Aww😍
    I always rewatch the one where Goblin and Reaper go to buy leeks and the guy on motorcycle shouts at them😂

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What??? I just finished Ep 13 of LMHYV, and he really likes her??? I really don’t want him to like her. I want him to keep her close and figure out what happened to his brother…and then like her. #mybrainismush

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I just saw the genius musical Hamilton and to my surprise, this Korean- American was who played Washington and he was AH-MAZING!!! Still getting goosebumps.

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    I’m jealous.

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      Me, too. I hope I can see it someday.

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        I hope you all are able to as well. It’s so well worth it! My sister-in-law bought my ticket for my birthday! We were in the orchestra level just outside what they call, “the Golden circle,” so really good seats. I would recommend every freakin’ American see it. Eat ramen for a month, walk to work, sell something, just go!

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    I’ve seen it three times now and I’m debating getting tickets one more time before it leaves Chicago for good next year. (I haven’t beggared myself to do so – I won the $10 lottery the first time, spent an arm and a leg the second time [worth it], and got free last minute matinee tickets the third time, so I’ve mostly been lucky.) Every viewing has astounded me and given me something new to take from the show – there is nothing from the music to the staging to the costumes to the choreography that hasn’t been painstakingly thought out and perfected to fit the narrative. I cry every time I listen to “It’s Quiet Uptown”. When the ghosts begin to fill the upper balcony on the stage towards the end – it gives me chills. Hamilton was a giant of a man, and one who truly reminds me that, even if this country is a garbage fire right now, we once had people who truly cared and who never stopped questioning and never stopped trying to be better, and that we need to protect those legacies and still keep growing and trying to be better.

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      I was in Chicago just before it opened there a couple years ago and it was 250.00 per ticket for a dress rehearsal! I didn’t go, obviously, but I’m glad the national tours came along sooner rather than later. I’m sure it’ll come to my city at some point. As King George III sings, “You’ll be back…!”

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        The tickets can be crazy. I know when it first opened here people were paying $400+ for tickets. Hamilton is the only show I think is worth that kind of crazy $$ but I also think it’s very possible to still see it and enjoy it for less if you make a bit of effort.

        When I paid for the tickets the second time I wanted to get really good seats for myself and my mother as a birthday gift since our birthdays are 4 days apart. (She’s also taken me to some amazing shows so I wanted to do this for her; we saw Waiting for Godot in the West End during its original run with Patrick Stewart and Ian Mckellen with great seats ten years ago, and it’s still one of the best shows I’ve ever seen.) I paid more than I ever have for theater tickets for Ham, but it was still less than $200/ticket. Still a lot, obviously, but at least I still get to keep my firstborn and all my limbs.

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          We probably paid about the same. And I paid nearly the same for Day6 next month! So, yeah, tickets to anything good nowadays are really expensive! I saw both Miss Saigon and Les Mis in NYC about 20 years ago and paid less than 50.00 a ticket! Both also amazing shows. I think my daughter and husband will see Les Mis next month as well. Both for the first time. Some shows are iconic. Hamilton is one of those shows.

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            Yup! I saw Les Mis last month, and I was debating going to see The Rose on Friday but $40 for a mid-size venue seems crazy to me, though it seems that’s the norm now. I may still decide to go last minute since the venue is close to me. I didn’t even try for Blackpink in the spring, though I may try next time.

            Thankfully, I can still get the $20 tickets to the Shakespeare theater here since they have a program to encourage those under 35 to see the shows for reasonable prices. When I do hit 35 in a few years I’ll have to start looking into season passes.

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Day6 will be four years old as a group next month and I’ll be able to watch them LIVE next month as well! Here’s some #kpopeducation about them and a lovely song! (REALLY, listen to the song!) http://www.mtv.com/news/3134287/day6-jae-young-k-interview-book-of-us-gravity/

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Aw! The Goblin feels just came to me with @egads going to Quebec and this interview with Kim Go Eun! https://www.soompi.com/article/1345811wpp/kim-go-eun-talks-about-what-goblin-cast-was-really-like-on-set-their-enduring-friendship

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And we’re done! Day6, Jae, Wonpil, Young K, Dowoon, and Sungjin, see you all in Dallas next month!!! #gravitytour

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