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Human Disqualification: Episode 8

We get more insight into our shady actress who struggles under the burden of her secrets and insecurities. While working on her behalf behind the scenes, her right-hand man begins questioning our escort’s dedication to his assigned job. No relationship in this drama is simple, and with competing priorities and agendas, someone is bound to get hurt.

 
EPISODE 8: “David and Bathsheba”

While Soon-kyu stares at Woo-nam’s text disappointedly, Min-ja calls Chang-sook. She drunkenly complains about how terribly her son treats her. Chang-sook asks if she’s drinking alone. “Yes, I’m drinking alone. I drink alone and eat alone.”

Min-ja shares through tears that she was against Jung-soo marrying Bu-jung at first but changed her mind after seeing how sweet Bu-jung is with Chang-sook. If Bu-jung was that loving, Jung-soo wouldn’t be lonely if he married her. Min-ja always felt jealous of Chang-sook and Bu-jung’s relationship.

Jung-soo watches from across the hospital room as Kyung-eun tearfully signs a do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order. He waits for her in the hall and then takes her for a bowl of noodles. Kyung-eun ignores a call from her mom and tells Jung-soo that her mom was the first person she called tonight.

Her mom’s response was to ask, “How could my son-in-law do this to me on a day like this?” Today is her mom’s birthday. Kyung-eun is disgusted by her mom’s response, even more so when she told her she’d better steel herself this time.

Kyung-eun explains this is the third time she’s had to sign a DNR. It’s one thing to say not to resuscitate from afar, but of course you want them to save him when you’re watching it happen. Others might see her husband only as a man confined to his bed, but she sees his sad tears and happy smiles. He smiled a lot the past few days, “so I asked them to save him.”

She asks Jung-soo what she should say to her mom, but he has no answer. Kyung-eun is now the one handing him a tissue when he breaks down crying.

At Akira, Ah-ran wakes up when Jong-hoon brings in some snacks for her. She explains she couldn’t sleep at home, so she came here. Ah-ran asks if he’s seeing someone – something about him feels different. He chuckles at the idea and says he’s not.

Ah-ran mentions that the account that posted about her secret child disappeared. Jong-hoon confirms he got rid of it, but he’s not sure who was behind it. She sighs that she can’t even report it because the story is true.

“It wasn’t you, was it?” Ah-ran asks. Only four people know that story: her, him, Jin-seob, and Bu-jung. Regardless of his faults, Jin-seob is the father, so it can’t be him. When Jong-hoon stiffly says it wasn’t him, Ah-ran concludes it must be Bu-jung, then.

She wonders what will be posted next. Maybe it’ll be a story of how she hasn’t seen her kid in Canada for 20 years. Ah-ran is scared to look herself up now, but she’s too curious about how people perceive her to stop.

When she sees a hate comment, she digs into the person’s social media, even checking out their friends, to see if they’re better than her. But they’re all just like her. Maybe they hate her because of the similarity.

Jong-hoon wonders what she’ll do if there’s another post. Will she publicly acknowledge her son? “I’ll use you to kill Writer Lee,” she says calmly. Ah-ran smiles like she’s joking, but I’d wager she’s pretty serious.

We now go back to the rooftop where Bu-jung and Kang-jae run into each other yet again. He surreptitiously slips Jung-woo’s phone into his pocket as she walks over. When he mentions their motel meeting earlier, Bu-jung says she doesn’t want to talk about that here.

Kang-jae isn’t sure where “here” is – the roof? Or the building? He sees her looking uncomfortable and doesn’t press. Setting boundaries is good, he reasons. Kang-jae sets a milk from his convenience store stash on the railing for her.

They were supposed to die together the next time they met coincidentally, but he didn’t think it’d be so soon. “We can’t die while drinking milk.” Ha.

Bu-jung wonders if he always says rash things like “let’s die together.” He doesn’t and isn’t sure what made him say that. Bu-jung looks upset but moves on. She amazes him by correctly guessing what type of ramyun he bought and just lets him think she’s that good of a guesser.

She thinks it’s nice to have a favorite – everything has felt the same to her for a while. She’s apathetic towards it all. Bu-jung shares that she was pregnant last year but lost the baby before she even had time to feel happy. Kang-jae recalls overhearing Bu-jung blaming Ah-ran for the loss of her job, her baby, and herself.

At the time, Bu-jung was exhausted and always crying, but inside she felt strangely the same. “There was nothing of mine inside me, and I didn’t know why I was sad or angry. I was just embarrassed.”

Everything disappears when you don’t have a favorite. She asks Kang-jae to play that song again and asks if he likes it. Kang-jae never really did before but thinks it sounds good listening to it like this. They stare out at the city and eat together – Bu-jung is even smiling a little – as they listen to “Hallelujah.”

At a restaurant, Ddak-yi also listens to “Hallelujah” and reads a translation of the lyrics. He gives an earbud to Min-jung when she arrives, and they listen to it together. She worries that he should be home since he’s been unwell, but Ddak-yi says he feels better now. I bet.

They go to order, and Ddak-yi is shocked when Min-jung says she doesn’t eat meat. “I don’t eat anything that can recognize its baby.” Out of solidarity, he politely decides to order something vegetarian too. His face falls a little when she asks if he ever got ahold of Kang-jae, but he masks his disappointment.

Min-jung recognizes the chorus of “Hallelujah” and recalls it’s about the story of David and Bathsheba. David saw her bathing on her roof and wanted her, so he sent her husband – who was his best friend – off to war. Min-jung sighs that nothing ever changes.

Woo-nam gets back to the pharmacy late that night and finds Min-ja asleep on the couch and Soon-kyu asleep at her desk. She wakes soon after and asks if his “pretty ex-wife Ji-yeon” is okay. What was ailing her? “Her heart,” he responds.

As Kang-jae and Bu-jung ride the elevator down, Kang-jae asks if her husband is the type to hang her coat up for her and such. He delicately says there’s a button undone on the back of her blouse, so he wanted to let her know in case it causes an issue.

A woman gets on the elevator with her cute, babbling baby. Kang-jae notices how Bu-jung avoids looking in their direction. When they exit, Kang-jae spots Chang-sook in the lobby and walks a little ahead so it doesn’t look like they came down together. Bu-jung goes back upstairs with her father.

After Jong-hoon gets Ah-ran to bed, he gets a text from someone called Manager Ahn. Jong-hoon chuckles at the photos of Bu-jung and Kang-jae separately going into a motel. He calls Kang-jae to ask how far he got with Bu-jung. He laughs like Kang-jae is being coy when he asks what Jong-hoon is talking about.

Jong-hoon is surprised when Kang-jae lies that he hasn’t met with Bu-jung yet. He’s texted her, but she hasn’t replied yet. Kang-jae promises to let him know when Bu-jung contacts him. Jong-hoon goes with it and doesn’t let on that he knows something is up.

That night, Bu-jung and her father sleep on the floor beside each other. He notes how late she was out tonight. Was she at the office all this time? Bu-jung answers honestly that she wasn’t.

When she says she was out meeting people, Chang-sook says it must’ve been tiring since meeting with people is the hardest thing. Bu-jung says tonight was okay, though. She asks Chang-sook if he’s ever experienced his heart beating so strongly that it moves his clothes.

Bu-jung knows it doesn’t make sense, but it really happened. (I’m assuming she’s referring to the undone button on her blouse.) The person wasn’t startled or running or even that happy. Chang-sook agrees it’s fascinating but thinks the person must be ill, which makes Bu-jung laugh.

Chang-sook asks if she’s doing okay and says everything is fine so long as she’s not ill. “If you’re not ill, you’ll find a way to survive.”

Bu-jung leaves later that night after her father falls asleep. She finds the bag Kang-jae left hanging on the door with bandaids and a few other items. (He glanced at her heel earlier and saw a run in her stocking where it met her high heels.)

After cleaning out Jung-woo’s room, Kang-jae sends Bu-jung a text from café hallelujah. He’s glad she seems well and muses that even if the peace is temporary, he believes everyone encounters good days where you get to rest. We see Kyung-eun by her husband’s side in the hospital as Bu-jung rides the bus.

Bu-jung puts her hand out of the window to feel the snow while Kang-jae continues narrating the text, “Like walking after resting, like running again after walking, like rain turning into snow and piling up.” Kang-jae (as café hallelujah) says he didn’t write that post, and the account isn’t his – can’t be his anymore.

Jung-soo and Bu-jung arrive outside their apartment building at the same time. He takes in her nice outfit and heels but doesn’t say anything. He just covers her with his winter coat and asks if she’s coming from Chang-sook’s.

The following day, Kang-jae takes a stand-in job as chief mourner. A woman hired him to pretend to be her fiancé at her father’s funeral. How brazen. Min-jung and Ddak-yi come to pay their respects, playing acquaintances of the deceased. Kang-jae leads an enthusiastically in-character Min-jung and an awkward Ddak-yi toward the dining room.

Afterward, Min-jung and Ddak-yi fill him in on the whole David and Bathsheba saga. Min-jung thinks the main point is that David and the husband were best friends, but Ddak-yi argues that’s a stretch; the husband was David’s subordinate. Kang-jae muses that it’s similar to his mom’s story.

On the bus ride back, Min-jung tells Ddak-yi that she and Kang-jae have known each other for five or six years. They met on the street and became closer after he let her crash at his place when she was kicked out of her trainee dorm.

Kang-jae takes issue with her statement that she slept at his place “a lot” – it was only twice when he wasn’t even home. Min-jung grumpily argues it’s still meaningful. She notices Kang-jae take out his phone only for another phone in his pocket to light up with a message.

Meanwhile, Jong-hoon looks for Ah-ran at her filming site. He sees her confronting the director over the abuse he keeps putting her character through. She’s done being a punching bag. After being severely beaten, how is it realistic for her character to go about life normally?

Ah-ran supposes he’s never been beaten before and details for him exactly what these kinds of wounds feel like. His idea of character is that she should boil some tea even while feeling like she’s dying? He argues it’s for product placement.

She sighs and says she’s fine with getting hit – this is pretend, after all. But she’s done getting beaten to a pulp and then going about life and smiling like everything is fine. The director looks over in surprise when Ah-ran puts a hand over her face and starts crying.

Once the director leaves, Jin-seob’s pleasant mask drops and he asks what Ah-ran thinks she’s doing. He accuses her of being on a power trip and angrily tosses the instant coffee pack at her before walking away.

Jong-hoon approaches her as she quietly sobs. He wants to take her home, but she insists on finishing her scenes. Jong-hoon stays by her side as she sobs some more.

While Jung-soo buys Min-ja a pair of shoes at his department store, she feels him out to see if Chang-sook said anything about her drunken phone call. Jung-soo assumes she caused trouble and gets more suspicious when she asks how things are at Bu-jung’s work. When he asks accusingly if she met with Chang-sook about Bu-jung, Min-ja scampers off.

Once Kang-jae gets home, he checks the message from Bu-jung that came to Jung-woo’s phone. She passed by the hospital earlier and thought of Min-soo. Is he doing well?

In the hospital waiting room, Bu-jung gets a text from Jung-soo asking if she can meet him out for dinner tonight. She lies that she has a late meeting. Jung-soo stares at the text with sad eyes.

As she gets settled in the exam room, Bu-jung receives a reply from café hallelujah: “Min-soo went to heaven recently.” Bu-jung stares in shock and flashes back to when she miscarried. She sinks to the ground, wrapping her arms around herself and burying her face in her knees. At home, Kang-jae hangs his head.


 
COMMENTS

Let’s hope Bu-jung is just at the hospital for a checkup but given that she probably wouldn’t tell anyone even if there were a problem, I’m a little concerned. Did she lie about working late because of the appointment, or did she just want to get out of dinner? Jung-soo looked so sad when she said no to dinner that I felt bad for him. He seems to be trying to reach her, but she’s not at all receptive. Bu-jung is so withdrawn and obviously still struggling with her depression, so why isn’t she currently being treated? I was surprised she opened up to Kang-jae about her miscarriage and talked about how she felt, but I’m glad she’s talking about it to someone.

Bu-jung always has her guard up around everyone except her father, but she still keeps a lot to herself to avoid worrying or disappointing him. Not that he’d actually be disappointed – Chang-sook’s reaction to hearing that she left her job proves that. I love the relationship between Bu-jung and Chang-sook not just because it’s sweet but because it shows a different side to Bu-jung. It’s like a glimpse into who she’d be without the weight of the world. She’s freer and shares her thoughts without hesitation. She smiles and laughs frequently. Maybe one day, she can be that person all the time.

Now that she and Kang-jae have gotten closer, it seems like he’s given up on the job. Is he trying to give Jong-hoon the runaround by lying to him about his contact with Bu-jung? I’m worried about what Jong-hoon will do now since he knows Kang-jae is lying. Kang-jae isn’t going to be able to hold him off for long, and Jong-hoon will likely just hire someone else if Kang-jae won’t do it. Ah-ran is going to expect results sooner or later. Even more concerning is Ah-ran’s comment about killing Bu-jung if another post about her secret son pops up on social media. I’m hoping she won’t actually go that far, but I have no doubt she’d at the very least try to completely destroy Bu-jung’s life.

I appreciate that every character, no matter their flaws, is treated with empathy and nuance. Even characters I dislike have moments that leave me sympathetic. I can’t stand Min-ja, but her crying over her loneliness made me feel for her a smidge. It’s a sad truth that elderly people are often isolated and forgotten by society. I’ve disliked Kyung-eun from the start, but her storyline is impactful. Caring for a dying spouse must be incredibly emotionally draining and stressful. Although I don’t agree with her method, I understand her need for companionship as she struggles to stay afloat. Then, there’s Ah-ran who vacillates between awful and pitiable. The way she spoke about what it feels like to be beaten sounded like it was from personal experience. Is Jin-seob abusive? A few episodes ago, Bu-jung’s housecleaning colleague suspected that Jin-seob might be hitting Ji-na (the young actress), so it seems like a distinct possibility. And I’m really curious about the situation with Ah-ran’s son in Canada.

I didn’t expect the song “Hallelujah” to take such a prominent role at the start, but I like its use as the drama’s theme song of sorts. Not only does it have the perfect vibe, both haunting and beautiful, but its ambiguity fits so well. Each cover of Cohen’s classic song interprets the meaning differently, the verses and performance style reflecting various aspects of the human experience. Depending on your perspective, the song might either be desolate or celebratory; that’s part of its enduring appeal. It’s interesting that this episode focused on the line about David and Bathsheba, highlighting the element of betrayal. Is it meant to emphasize past betrayals or to foreshadow future ones? I’d like to think our protagonists have been through the worst of it, but I expect there’ll be more pain to come as we enter the second half of the drama.

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I want to say the scene with Ah-Ran has her monologs with the director about being abused was a FANTASTIC bit if acting. My God the actress nailed that scene, she had all of my sympathy in those scenes. Just wow. This episode showed all the characters in this show are miserable. I feel bad for Kyung Eun, it is very very difficult taking care of a suck loved one and sometimes you need a break. It shouldn't be with someone else's husband but I empathize with the need for a break. BJ and KJ seem to be lighter this episode and I enjoy that for them.

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It was a stunning scene - her battered face and her reasoning and then Jin-seob's hypocrisy and bullying. Everyone needed respite from their private hell.

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So far, Ah-Ran’s character and the talented actress playing her intrigue me and hold my interest the most in this drama. As sad as he might be, the ML is a young, handsome and healthy guy. He can make money by playing a “crying shoulder”, a boy-toy for older ladies or go get another job. No one is holding a gun to his head or to his friends’ heads. The three of them don’t come across as pitiful. Somehow, their lifestyle looks ...lazy compared to others. They can change their lives any time they wish. Not so with the FL who lost her job and a baby.

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Ah-ran in the TV studio was a masterclass! It was hard to not feel what she was feeling while watching it. At the same time, it made me wonder what the team behind THIS show, i.e., Lost, were going through making it. I mean, 50 Shades of Depression, can't be the easiest show to film, I am guessing. :(

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“50 Shades of Depression” deserves 100 upvotes. :D

It’s funny how the setting, story, all characters’ jobs in most Kdramas tend to be in one industry, professional circle. Let me find famous examples: Healer - journalists. Oh My Ghost - restaurant workers/owners. My Love From Another Star - movie industry. And so on and on: It’s Ok It’s Love - psychotherapists and everyone else is their patients. Another 5 dramas - all doctors, other 10 dramas all characters are lawyers and prosecutors.
This drama has finally broke the mold and put its characters in different job fields, but all of them are equally unhappy, depressed, miserable, some suicidal, including the tragic late singer of the theme song. Seriously, is depressed the new sexy or something?

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I like that we are getting different facets of all the characters so that we can see their perspectives. While we see that they are pitiful, their individual capacities for causing damage frightens me. My favourite moment was the sharing of milk and food on the rooftop. Little by little they inch closer and bring each other comfort. The most painful moment was when Bu-jung learned about Min-soo - the blow registered as a physical one for both Bu-jung and Kang-jae. It's all so exquisitely constructed.

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It’s almost like everyone is so miserable and they are willing to do the worst and really don’t care. It’s scary.

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"their individual capacities for causing damage" - this is what I was getting at when I said in a separate comment on your fw post that I felt this show was explaining and validating all kinds of masochistic behaviour. 'Self-harm makes sense if you're in this state of mind' is the message I was getting from this. While this show is somewhat like an encyclopedia of depression, would it be too much to ask that a mental health professional also appear somewhere somehow and help at least one of them? given that it's a kdrama, yes, it probably is a big ask. :(

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I was thinking damage to others. I just could not bear anyone hurting Kang-jae.

But yes, I understand now what you mean - masochistic self harm, hence the suicidal trajectories. I completely missed what you were saying. Re, a mental health professional, that was You are My Spring. (quietly lol)

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You know you love a drama when the MIL starts to become endearing.

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I felt for her one moment but then a thought struck me. Her loneliness is a product of what the society set up for her. As a mother of a ‘son’, she expected her son and his family to stay with her and take care of her. But, instead they left to their own home. Contrast that to Bu Jeong’s father who has no such expectations because as a father of a daughter he always knew he would live by himself in old age. He is happy with whatever little time he gets to spend with His daughter.
I also think MIL blames Bu Jeong for taking her son away from her because of her health. She blames her for losing the baby. to me she comes across as entitled even though I see that she is lonely.
But, I am surprised she hasn’t outed Bu Jeong’s job loss yet.

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It's not like that, even if the son is expected to take care of her that doesn't mean the MIL gets to live with him. There is much we don't know about her but it seems she is selfish and narcissistic. She wants to have respect and affection but she doesn't give it or know how to give it to others.

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@quirkycase is spot on when she calls this out. There's no one in this show that I dislike right now. Each character has a background and circumstance you empathize with. Every ordinarily questionable action of theirs is explained. I can't think of another show that's done this so well.

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Kang-jae seemed a bit surprised when Bu-jung first came to the roof. It was fun to see him be a bit awkward for a moment.

Also do wonder if Kang-jae is stringing Jong-hoon along in order to avoid Jong-hoon hiring someone else to shadow Bu-jung. Still, Jong-hoon has those pictures so he could likely push forward with them alone if he wanted to. :(

Started wishing Chang-sook would tell Bu-jung what he told Min-ja when he found out she wasn't employed at the publishing house anymore. But I'd also like him to admit his memory is going, though not sure if Bu-jung is aware of that already with her asking him that money question.

I wish I could feel sympathy for Kyung-eun but she just plows through so many boundaries that I instead started feeling sorry for Jung-soo when she sucker punched him with her grief.

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I keep thinking about ‘ David and Bathsheba’! Who is going to betray whom!!!

I was surprised that Bu-Jung opening up to his so quickly. In hindsight, I realize I shouldn’t be since she was willing to spend the night in a motel with him. She finds comfort in his presence. She seeks out to him. I wonder what he feels towards her. An attraction? A person who he can relate to? Someone whose pain he understands? May be this is the first time he is having such a personal conversation with anybody. He and his mother have avoided talking about his dad altogether. He didn’t share his grief with Ddkki after their friends death. He just holds everything inside. And I think her opening up to him is making his feel things? May be someday he will be the one talking and she listening.

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I've found it interesting since the beginning that the show has opted for Jeff Buckley's version of Hallelujah. Cohen's original is raunchy and guttural and oozes sex, the chorus sounds like an ecstatic exclamation.

Buckley's is the quiet sadness of a relationship that started in intense physicality and has withered away into silence and echoing sadness. It aches. It is indeed a cold and broken Hallelujah.

If it's possible to make a visual representation of this song, then this would be it.

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I love too that love is a broken Hallelujah. It's definitely not a Cohen rendition.

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Is it me or Jeff Buckley’s long hair might have had inspired the ML’s hair style in the drama? People thought the singer committed suicide. Is that why the director used his version of Hallelujah?
https://www.loc.gov/static/programs/national-recording-preservation-board/documents/Hallelujah_LoryIrvin.pdf

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Buckley’s “Hallelujah” is aching all on its own, but especially in this show has more meaning. “Hallelujah” was off his first album, and three years later he had drowned unexpectedly in the Mississippi river at the age of 30, which is very close to the age of a lot of these characters.

Buckley hadn't failed, but he wasn’t skyrocketing in his career yet. His first album wasn’t a hit, though well received, and he was stopping and starting on a second one. He had so much potential that some clearly saw, but there was no guarantee it would translate to success. He was in a bit of a lull, but still okay, then one day went for a swim and never came back.

So to hear that song so steadily in this show is interesting. It’s a young man singing an old song and full of unrealized potential that fate derailed. For me it’s not the lyrics, it’s the singer who makes this soundtrack choice so haunting.

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I have been a huge fan of Jeff Buckley's since 1994 when I bought his album Grace. I agree that it is the singer that makes this version of the song especially poignant. It's a great cover - in that it takes the source material and make something unique to the new singer and his POV. I think the saddest and the sexiest song on the album is "Lover, You Should Have Come Over." I was obsessed with that song.

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I find myself practically holding my breath waiting for whatever bad is going to happen to happen.

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Absolutely, this was a gut wrenching week for the show. I made the mistake of watching both episodes back to back, and personally, struggled through them. They were beautifully made, but also miserably so, and I'm dreading to think of where it's all headed. Have we reached breaking point, and is it going to be repaired now, or are we going to be broken further?, is what I ask myself each time.

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It's not a problem that everyone is miserable and that the show it's so sad right now... it's okay with me. But I'm starting to wonder when it will all become too much. There is surely space for more disaster and I'm quite scared. I wish for everyone to find a bit of peace. We need more rooftop scenes and milk <3

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I have a query: Are any of you fluent in Korean and/or have an in depth knowledge of the SK’n society? I am asking this because from the little that I know, the rate of suicides are high in SK and I worry that a number of Korean shows that I have seen include this theme. Are there any discussions in SK about how suicide should be discussed, portrayed and prevented in various media including TV, film and streaming platforms? Are there any cautionary messages included at the beginning of such programs and suicide prevention/counseling services info displayed at the end of such programs? I understand that suicide is a complex tragedy that needs to be discussed in order to be prevented but suicide ideation is also frighteningly palpable for some distressed individuals.

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There is a thing in Korean/Asian society as “ burden on a family”. In terms of bringing dishonor as a failure or when losing most of the money. People would rather kill themselves than deal with it. That’s the pull, the downside of a “strong and close family ties” for you - better die than be a stain on family’s name.
Suicide was also kind of romanticized and it goes back centuries. It was considered the best outcome for young childless widows of nobility (the poor widows were slaves, working bees, they had to stay alive for work) to kill themselves after their husbands deaths in order not to be a burden on the family. The King would even reward the family for their “honor saved”. Even today, some elderly people kill themselves because they don’t want to be a
“burden” on their families when they get sick.
There’s no suicide “trigger warnings” on Korean shows, only the usual disclaimers for violence, sex, tobacco use and statements that everything is a fiction. But there are restrictions on reporting the cause and the method when it happens in print media.
This is, honestly, the second TV drama (different from Korean movies, some are very dark) I have watched out of hundreds that is really in dire need of such trigger warning. The first one was 2005 A Love to Kill with Rain.

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Marina, thank you for your reply. I appreciate knowing the points you have raised. This issue like so many others has to be understood in its historical context with its socio, economic and political dimensions.

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I have the same thoughts. This drama needs to show a warning. They can't have someone smoking or holding a knife but it's fine to keep talking about suicide like that?

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Ironically, it seems they consider the former more damaging than the latter. It may also be they consider this a healing drama, so this for them is a way to prevent suicide.

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Yes, I can imagine people saying that. How much healing a healing drama should have before it gets that label? If you ask me I'd say 15 eps of healing. This would not fit the bill.

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This episode was even more boring than the previous. The drama has also become questionable. I don't like all the constant casual talk about suicide without some message about mental health. It's strange to say that because I don't like preachy plots but it's not something they can use in a light way.

That leads to one more reason this drama has become questionable, after this week, the eps are seeming more like sadness porn than any intimate construction about a relationship between two troubled people. This is what ep 1 promised, but instead we get about 50 min per episode of repetitive boring secondary characters in random sad moments. We don't need more of the MIL being selfish, the husband trying to be nice but distant at the same time, the ex-girlfriend being sorry for herself, the girl that tags along showing interest in KJ and ignoring Just while Just basically ignores everything but her. Those are the same scenes being replayed over and over but not adding anything to the plot.

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"intimate construction about a relationship between two troubled people" this is what I'm waiting for and not really getting from the show right know (we only get like 7 minutes of screentime or something) "we get about 50 min per episode of repetitive boring secondary characters in random sad moments. " - yeah same. it is okay to learn about the secondary characters but not like getting more screentime than the main characters. This kind of slow take they do with the show is maybe ok with more episodes but not with 16! and i hate the teaser trailers because I always think and hope for more scenes with the main characters and not getting it.

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Lol - sadness porn is quite a good description of this drama. I would not recommend binge watching this one. There are no light moments to relax in-between the gloom all around.

I think that both leads have moved away from actually committing suicide, that is why he can so casually mention it and why she is telling him off for proposing it so easily. I thought it was in a way quite clever of him to address the elephant in the room. If it can be talked about, it will easier to overcome.
But I agree, the program needs suicide warnings and links for help!

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