Rating:
Average user rating 5.0
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Be Melodramatic: Episodes 9-16 (Series review)

You guyssss, it’s over! What are we to do? Letting go of dramas is never easy, but it’s proving to be especially hard with Be Melodramatic. Mainly because I got too comfortable hanging out with our girls and their various friends and family, and I forgot that (duh) it had to end. But then, the slice-of-life genre is just that, a mere sliver of these characters’ lives, so I guess there is no true ending. It simply stops where it needs to be stopped, where the writer wants to leave us off.

All this time, our quirky writer Jin-joo has worked hard on her debut drama “It Gets Better When You Turn Thirty.” This being the actual story of her life (and the story we’ve been watching), it’s been tough for her to power through to the ending, too. She’s trying to figure out the best way to handle work, friendship, and love in fiction when she hasn’t quite figured it out in reality. As we see in this last half of the drama, it’s the odd combination of naivety and experience that make her thirties so great.

From where we left off in the last review, the three heroines are laser-focused on their careers. For Eun-jung, our resident documentary director, she’s more stressed over the “ghost” of her late boyfriend Hong Dae. After seeing footage of herself talking to no one, she acknowledges the fact that she’s enduring the ghost she’s created in order to remember him. Only now, she sees this entity as a reminder that she misses him rather than the comfort he was before.

So Eun-jung walks over to her brother and girlfriends and admits, “I’m having a hard time. Please hug me.” She doesn’t have to tell them twice — in fact, they’d been waiting for her to say those words for a long time. This was a big moment for her, and for the group as a whole. Jin-joo had been stressing over her drama (due to her ex Hwan-dong snatching her desired cast and crew) and Han-joo had been stressing over her rebelling son In-gook, but that all disappeared when they heard that their best friend was hurting.

Meanwhile, Han-joo’s hoobae Jae-hoon continues riding the roller coaster of emotions with his girlfriend Ha-yoon. It’s obvious that they’re exhausted holding their relationship together, but neither are willing to leave it. There’s one scene where they try to act as a couple again, shopping for groceries and cooking a meal, and it feels so… empty. Needless to say, it was painful to watch. Ha-yoon does move out of their apartment the morning after, suggesting a break-up, only to return later on as if nothing had happened. The roller coaster goes on.

On a separate roller coaster, on the other side of this metaphorical theme park, we have the celebrity/manager couple So-min and Min-joon. Min-joon accepts a job at another company, and So-min is so lost without him that it hinders her work. She gets reprimanded on set of a commercial for, according to the red-faced director KIM SANG-SOO (Sohn Seok-gu), being unable to act through her sadness. Thankfully, Eun-jung, who’s still filming So-min for a documentary, puts the director in his place.

Eun-jung then convinces So-min to stop overthinking and go after her man. So-min rushes over to Min-joon’s place and confesses for the both of them, knowing he likes her too. She almost bails from their intense moment, realizing she’s not wearing makeup, but he pulls her back and calls her pretty. They kiss and I screech like a chimpanzee. They’re so stinkin’ cute.

Diving back into drama business, the production company discovers similarities between Jin-joo’s script and her former boss Writer Jung’s script. This is because Jin-joo and Hwan-dong (the director of Jung’s drama) both incorporated their relationship into their writing.

Jin-joo and Hwan-dong keep it totally professional, with Hwan-dong even encouraging Jin-joo to continue writing without editing anything out. Still, this whole ordeal starts a crazy mess of rumors about Jin-joo, the main one being she seduced her director Beom-soo into greenlighting her drama. She avoids Beom-soo for the next few days, which is hard on him since he’s just realized he likes her.

Upon her brother’s request, Eun-jung visits a psychologist to discuss her grief. And I’ve gotta say, I appreciate this so much. It seems like mental illness and therapy is appearing in a lot more kdramas nowadays. Sometime later, Eun-jung has a terrible nightmare where Hong Dae’s ghost tries to strangle her, angry that she’s trying to move on from him.

When she wakes up, she sees the ghost again and follows it down the street until she runs into a very drunk man. This man gets rough with her, so another man steps in and comes to her rescue — the commercial director. While Eun-jung recognizes him immediately, it takes Director Kim a second to realize she’s the “psycho” who snapped at him. Derp.

Tired of Jin-joo’s silence, Beom-soo confesses and tries to kiss her. But she steps back, literally and figuratively, needing time to think their relationship out — with her friends, of course. She thinks of all the reasons she likes him, saying, “He’s fun to be around. I don’t get mad when he does annoying things. He can be pathetic but cute… I get worried when I can’t see him… Aish, why are there so many reasons?”

Jin-joo remains ambivalent about Beom-soo until Hwan-dong asks her out to dinner, implying that he wants to get back together. Thinking of Beom-soo, she tells Hwan-dong that it’s best for them to leave their past behind and look to the future. Hwan-dong understands, calling her cool. And he’s right — our girl is cool. She leaves the restaurant to find Beom-soo and give him the kiss he’s been waiting for.

The episode that follows (episode 13) is probably my favorite. Jin-joo heads over to her new work studio, and she’s so giddy in love that she lets out a fart. She laughs at herself until she realizes that Beom-soo is right behind her. And like the drama queen she is, she drops to the floor in an over-the-top show of embarrassment.

Jin-joo brings this story home to her friends, and I kid you not — this discussion about farting goes on for the entire episode. I thought it was ridiculous, but then the show went on to even make that poignant. Jin-joo’s mom braves farting in front of her hubby for the first time ever, and he gets scared for her health, having had a friend who lost his wife to cancer. This show, y’all. This show.

Okay, so after Jin-joo erases her fart from Beom-soo’s memory, Beom-soo is thrown into some stress at the office. He hurts his wrist from arm-wrestling Hwan-dong (who wanted to “beat [him] at something”), and he gets a major headache from Han-joo and the marketing team urging him to include an irrelevant massage chair PPL. Jae-hoon calms him down by handing him fancy bottled water. Wow, PPL inception.

In the middle of all this, Jae-hoon starts spending more time with Han-joo, needing someone to talk to about his failing relationship. Naturally, him spending time with Han-joo just makes girlfriend Ha-yoon suspicious.

Eun-jung’s psychologist suggests she take a day off and do some volunteer work at the orphanage she donated her money to. She does just that, surprised to run into Director Kim yet again. It turns out that Director Kim donates all of his earnings to the orphanage and spends his time there for fun. They get to talking, starting the weirdest yet sweetest friendship.

The director is simultaneously chill and outspoken, just like Eun-jung, and it both intrigues and annoys her. She goes home, and we see that she’s still bothered by Hong Dae’s ghost. Not by the ghost itself, but by the fact that she’s using the ghost because she misses him. She suddenly recalls an app that Hong Dae used, online scrapbooking all their times together, and recharges his phone to look through it.

In it, Hong Dae recorded everything from the time he fell for her to the time he got sick. She reads his desires for her to remember only one thing (that she kissed him first) and to let him remember the rest. “I trust you,” he wrote. “I trust you, but… Ah, I can’t trust you. Please, for me, protect yourself.” She holds the phone to her chest and smiles through her tears, promising that she will.

Elsewhere, Han-joo advises Jae-hoon to gather the courage to look past his resentment towards Ha-yoon. Taking her advice to heart, Jae-hoon comes home to a waiting Ha-yoon and embraces her.

The morning after, Jae-hoon wakes up to Ha-yoon packing. This time, she insists, it’s for good. She simply wanted one last embrace from him before leaving their relationship. He’s confused and frustrated, unable to say much as she sincerely apologizes and walks out the door one last time.

Jae-hoon catches Han-joo going into a restaurant with her jerk of an ex-husband Seung-hyo. Jae-hoon follows them and listens in as Seung-hyo explains that he wants to get their family back together. He tells her that he’s doing this because he’s sick, making a big deal out of it, only to reveal that it’s rhinitis. Han-joo tries to slap him multiple times, but he dodges every blow. Finally, Jae-hoon comes in and punches him to the ground, immediately apologizing and saying that it’s his job to resolve whatever his sunbae couldn’t.

Han-joo goes home to tell her friends about her ex, but they have to whisper since little In-gook is sleeping in the next room. They have a hilariously heated discussion until Han-joo reveals that she has no intention whatsoever of getting back with her ex. In fact, she says with a smile, she’s sort of dating someone.

They assume that she’s talking about Jae-hoon, but it’s actually a guy she met at a club and exchanged numbers with. What?! Why haven’t we seen more of this mystery guy?! I was rooting for the Han-joo/Jae-hoon ship, but I guess I can’t be too mad. Han-joo’s friendship with Jae-hoon really was nothing but a friendship, and a damn good one at that.

It’s almost time for Jin-joo’s drama to start filming, so she explains all of her characters’ endings to Beom-soo, at the same time, explaining all of our characters’ endings to us. Beom-soo isn’t crazy about Jin-joo’s preference to an open ending, but he does agree that hers is meaningful. How right he is, too. I’ve said this before, but I just love that every character has their own important story.

While this is where Jin-joo’s drama ends, it doesn’t end for us. We skip to one year later, and we learn that “It Gets Better When You Turn Thirty” only received 1 percent ratings. (OMG, the meta!) Jin-joo doesn’t let that bring her down, though, as she’s signed on for two more dramas with Beom-soo. Jumping to Han-joo, we learn that she’s still going steady with her boyfriend and Jae-hoon is adorably supportive. Later, Jae-hoon actually runs into Ha-yoon and the two (while a bit awkward) are glad to see each other.

Finally, jumping to Eun-jung, we learn that she’s leaving for Europe, having been inspired by Director Kim to film another documentary. She sees Hong Dae again, smiling, and she says her final goodbyes by promising to meet him when her time comes. She comes back to the apartment, which like the end of every typical sitcom, is nearly empty. Everyone’s ready to move on to the next chapter of their lives, but they share one last night in their home eating ramen. And, voila, we’ve come full circle.

I don’t know how many times I can say I freaking loved this show. I loved seeing it pick up on the littlest things, like the different ways people stress over weight, exhaustion, or yeah, even flatulence. I loved that the majority of the soundtrack was made up of songs that the characters had written or sung. I loved our girls, I loved our guys — our sisters and brothers and parents and kids. And I loved Jin-joo and Beom-soo showing us the process of how a drama like this is actually brought to life.

The drama was (excuse the pun) very mellow, but the unique humor gave it a spark that kept it feeling alive. Though I wish we’d gotten more time with certain characters, I think the amount of screentime and character development was pretty evenly distributed. With that, I’m satisfied enough to say goodbye. So to close, I have to commend the lovely quotes that were reiterated in every episode’s ending credits. I haven’t reached my thirties yet, and it’s something I’m always thinking (ahem, worrying) about, so reading those quotes felt like the nudges of encouragement I didn’t know I needed. I’ll be sure to remember Jin-joo’s advice of “living deliciously” the next time I eat ramen.

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I freaking loved this show!! the soundtrack is my favorite track of all time. I loved that they changed the romantic pairings and introduced new characters!

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Thank you @sailorjumun. I ❤ this show and I feel like I can say a LOT about it, yet it is one of those shows where saying those words outloud would not do this show justice. I will remember this forever and thank you show for being in existence!

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I said this in the Open thread and I'll say it again because it bears repeating, what am I going to do without this drama in my life(reruns don't count)? I loved how the show drew on my emotions and helped me deal with my own pain as the characters dealt with theirs. It wasn't loss through a death that I've dealt with but over the last 4 years I've dealt with the loss of my home and had to move into a homeless shelter. I also had to leave school for a while to save up enough to go back. I've also felt the joy of getting back on track again and of dreams being renewed. Through these characters, this drama helped me process hurt, celebrate growth and simply own my weird because there are people who love me inspite of or perhaps because of those weird bits of myself. I also loved the little injections of humor throughout the show: PPL water right after making fun of PPL scene, the "Whisper" conversation, any scene with the weird director dude. I will hold dear the memories we made while waiting for another gem to come my way.

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I liked the show, expect for the lead couple and the fact that it was all from their prospective. It would be better if Jin joo and Beom soo were more interesting people. They were trying so hard to be different that it fell flat.

Jin joo was not the one upset about the crew going to Hwan dong, it was Beon soo ,who by the way did not have the greenlight for the show yet so the crew he was use to took work with someone else and for some reason he was entitled and being a complete dick about it.

And I don't think Hwan dong wanted to reconcile with Jin joo, I think he wanted closure as their last official breakup really was not on good footing for either of them. I think he just wanted to do something nice for Jin joo to make up for the lean years during their relationship. And Jin joo being Jin joo saw it as something else and gave the big speech.

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i don't think jin joon really saw it as something else. i think she understood what he wanted but they were at different points dealing with the finality of their relationship. she had moved past the regrets and was not quite so bitter as she was in the beginning (to a certain degree) with what happened between them; she no longer needed the same closure he was still seeking for himself. what i do still grapple with is that she refused to give him his closure, but that, as we know, would have been unlike her to do so...

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This is a great take and falls very much with her self centerness.

And honestly, if the show did a flash forward for seven years, it will be the same thing with her relationship with Beom soo.

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I had a more charitable take on Beom Soo and the poaching of his crew. When you get a team together that works well and that you are comfortable with, of course you are going to be unhappy and resentful when you can't re-create that team on a new project. I wouldn't say his behavior was especially bad - yeah, he has a temper - who doesn't - but he got another team together and just went on, he didn't stay mad or try sabotage or try to steal the team back.
And as for Hwan Dong, perhaps he didn't want to get back together with Jin Joo, but I think he wasn't too happy about her moving on, either, and would have liked to have her still like him best. That's a very human thing, to not want someone anymore but not want anyone else to be in their heart, either.

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This drama was a breath of fresh air. I love everything about it. The characters (yes jin joo too!), the meta humour, the self-awareness.... All this while managing to be extremely real. While jin joo in the later half of the series was more comic relief, the two other friends broke my heart. Eun Jung learning to be happy and move on (i love that she's still working on herself), and Han Joo's conversation with the male coworker was SOO insightful. And she got a boyfriend!! Im sad but glad she didnt end up with him. Cuz she's right. He's a good friend but he's toxic.

Also, can we talk about the soundtrack? The Smell of Shampoo <3 Or even the Poop «smelly» song XD this drama is an underrated gem and I'm so lucky to have been able to watch it live.

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RE: Han joo. She was so damn whip smart through out the entire series and I love that the series kept that consistent. Shows seem to make the female characters two ways. If the woman is smart, she lacks in other departments and it either a doormat or just a douche or if they are super sweet and nice, they are dim or just dumb and are always in situations where they lack common sense to get out of.

Han joo was just on it. She knew what to do when her ex left her, she knew how to handle her former in laws, you know why she promoted at her job, and she knows how to talk to people and she can read people. Just all around awesome and now that the show is over, she was my favorite of the three ladies.

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Han Joo might be the most emotionally intelligent of the three friends. Her jaw-dropping analysis of Jae Hoon's awful relationship was precise and astonishingly empathetic to both parties.

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That was such a great scene! Even though Be Melo kept surprising me with its greatness, I found this the greatest scene of all. I cried buckets for how enlightening it was. Throughout the drama, I couldn't exactly put my finger on Jae Hoon's mistakes. I felt sth was off and that Ha Yoon was not to blame entirely, but, man, that was such a punch-gut scene. I cried so much for the perfection in which Han Joo imitated Ha Yoon and delivered those lines.

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The show is honest, real, sarcastic, therefore it's painful... I never waste any episode without crying over Eun-joong's story, and that the friends and the brother are always there for her... This show, has all my heart <3 <3 <3

I love how the serial is like our real life: with various different characters with their own lives without anyone being too outstanding, and sometimes without extreme villain.... It's fun to watch a serial without extreme love triangle. Well, even there's an ex that might keep lingering, or suspicious girlfriend (Ha-yoon). The story flows naturally without too much drama with heart-warming conversation. My favorite lines are between Jin-joo and her sister about poverty. Like, how long she will be poor. And Jin-joo realistically said, she will be poor her whole life.

Topic about farting in episode 13 had my heart almost sunk with Jin-joo's father reaction... :(( The scene when her father handled her mother the check-up brochure while saying "I've schedule an appointment with the doctor" had me crying like a river. That scene is simple yet poignant.

I love the message what the drama wants to convey: about moving on with your life even if shits happen, and you're still lucky if still have people who love you around you: Eun-joong finally said goodbye to the "ghost" of Hong-dae; Han-joo decided to move on with her current steady relationship with the guy she met in the club; Jin-joo with her writing career and relations with Beom-soo; Jae-hoon who at the ends wants to still have a good relation with Ha-yoon (by asking her for beer after the musical)....This drama is like our lives: it's moving on. As the viewer we can continue the story in our minds...

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I love this show! I love how the writers developed the relationships between Jin Joo and Bum Soo. How sweet to go from disliking each other to maintaining that love temperature. I loved their conversations about how to confess, is it necessary to confess, and finally deciding to go for the best thing in the world.

I love the sunbae-hoobae relationship of Han Joo and Jae-hoon and how despite sparks, they are respectful friends in a professional relationship.

I love how So Min and her manager finally took that step to be together and how simple that realization was made. Him going from a bully to her protector to her manager then boyfriend, and husband was so heartwarming. She was his dream come true.

Can't say enough good things about this show! <3

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The meta and the pop culture references to Reply 1988, etc. are too good! Why are you so witty, show?!

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OMG! yes! i loved the reference to Reply 1988...
"what's wrong with jung bong?" hahaha

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My favorite meta was the massage chair. I mean, massage chairs had been popping up all over the place in dramas lately, to the point where I expected people to become exhausted from enthusiastic vacuuming with their Dyson vacuums and having to refresh and relax in their wonderful massage chairs...anyway, the glossy scene with Han Joo and her son, just randomly inserted, still makes me smile because it was so clever and so cute and so spot-on. Way to skewer the system, show!

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overall, i greatly enjoyed the the drama. my favorite was definitely eun-jung. her story just resonated with me. but i swear the show had me on an emotional rollercoaster. one minute i'd be in tears and then the next i'd be laughing at the most unexpected thing.

i wanted more screen time for eun-jong's brother and his beau. i wanted more exploration of the relationship. i went in expecting more of him than so-min, even if the latter's relationship was entertaining, but was glad to get at least some bread crumbs...

my favorite quote from this show has to be jin-joo's speech when hwan-dong takes her out to the fancy dinner...to be able to let the past be because expectations for what's to come have finally exceeded past regrets...that's a life goal right there! like many of you i will greatly miss this gem.

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I hear your regarding Hyo Bong and his boyfriend. I suppose it's baby steps for kdrama but I was glad to at least see that his relationship was healthy.

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yes. baby steps but glad it is getting there.

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You know, I found it refreshing and amazingly adult. Instead of trumpeting how woke and sensitive and evangelistic they are, writer/director just presents it as a part of life and they don't need to go there because this relationship is settled and healthy. What a concept.

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This show almost slipped past my radar despite effusive Beanie praise for early episodes. Thankfully @sailorjumun’s hilarious review of Ep. 2-8 alerted me to this jewel and the show quickly became essential viewing. Once Jin Joo’s radio-controlled cart sped past the tiny dogs at the park, I built an drama alter and waited for Fridays. God, I lived for those English subs!

Because it’s all too easy for me to fall into obsessive gif-making frenzies, I restricted myself to a couple screen captures and happily watched every episode a couple times—alternating between hoots of laughter and moist eyes.

While I grew to love all the characters, Eun Jung’s journey especially touched my heart. Jeon Yeo Bin’s performance was a perfect blend of joy, pathos, sarcasm and hope. In addition to her co-leads, she had excellent male screen partners too. Showing how lovely Hong Dae was made her loss more palpable and I loved every interaction with Director Nice-n-Warm, thanks to Son Seok Koo’s lethal combination of sex appeal and goofiness.

I’m praying to the drama gods that a talented writer will take to Archive of Our Own to write fan fiction detailing what happens when Eun Jung meets with Director Nice-n-Warm in Casablanca. I’ll add some more Quiznos to the altar, shall I?

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OMG! I completely agree. There was just something about Son Seok Koo...he was definitely a lethal combination! One of my favorite scenes is Eun Jung going off on him and he just relents and says you win. All his yelling/cursing and yet she is the psycho...HAHAHA...

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I'll join your prayer! (And add another prayer for their wedding on season 5 ^^)

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Let me in on it too if the fanfic happens!

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OMG could u share your gifs if u do make some!! :P HAHAHAH we all need some of those gifs in our lives :")

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Visit the naver search results page for 멜로가 체질. Scroll down to the blog section where you'll find lots posts with great photos and GIFs!

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This show had some of the most brilliant scenes and twists. My heart ached at Hyo Bong and his boyfriend's experience at the restaurant. It was so subtle and so powerful. The whisper scene left me shaking my head in awe and I think that I became dehydrated by the tears that I shed for Eun Jung. This show made me miss the many years I was blessed to live with friends. JTBC is truely a gift that keeps giving great dramas.

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I described that last episode to someone as a mobius strip, the drama turning back on itself in an infinite loop. The most *unusual* scene was when Han-joo turns into Jae-hoon's girlfriend in order to tell him the HE was actually the bad guy in the relationship. There's no way that scene should have made sense or worked but it did.

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I watched the Viki version of 'Melo is my nature' then afterwards Googled Youtube scenes from 'Be Melodramatic'. The scene with writer Jung under the red umbrella in the rain was to the song 'Stand by your man' straight out of 'Pretty Noona Who Buys Me Food'. Except that song was excised from the Viki version. Viki had also half-wrecked 'Radiant' that way by cutting out significant songs that can be found in 'Dazzling'.

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Aigoo ... I've grown increasingly frustrated with Viki's changed or excised music. Ep. 10 is also missing the original Whitney Houston song from the scene where Beom Soo takes the bullets for Jin Joo.

I didn't even know this was a thing until I started comparing English subs for Fate and Furies on Viki and Kocowa last December. On the original version seen in Kocowa, the FL hears a song by Adele in the background and tells a story how everyone at school was obsessed with it. In the Viki version, it's bland muzak and her story makes zero sense.

It's one thing to swap out background music but it's even worse when they cut a scene all together. Last week the eeevil step-mother from Graceful Family sings along to Non, Je Ne Regrette Rien, a song made famous by Edith Piaf. I'd originally caught the show on a *cough* alternative streaming site that has quick subs and saw the original scene. The actress is the real deal with background in musical theater background with degrees in French and Performance Arts.

What did Viki do? They chopped out the scene entirely because it wasn't just background music they could swap out. I guess the streaming rights for non-Korean songs is too prohibitive and it's our loss, especially when the songs are integral to the storyline.

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The series 'Misty' made significant use of Bob Dylan's song "Knockin' on Heaven's Door" and wove it into the plot. The original was used when I first watched the series on Drama Fever. When Vicki acquired 'Misty' it got swapped out. At least they had the sense to do a cover version, though why they swapped Bob Dylan for a dreamy female singer I'll never know.

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bobby d costs too much😉

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I love this little gem of a drama! I love its use of pop culture references, inside jokes and all that meta. At first I was quite confused about the humor but grew to love it as the episodes went on. It's silly yet poignant and brutally honest about daily life and our society. The ratings could have been better but I'm happy the drama is getting a lot of love from netizens, and the cast and crew seem to be very fond of this project, as well. It would be nice if we could get a season 2. I want to see more of our characters, especially Eunjung and funny-weird Director Kim.

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This is a niche drama. Most of the leads are famous in Korea's serious film circles for doing indoe and art movies, so I am not surprised that the general public didn't eat it up.

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This drama was great!

Eun Jung's journey was my favourite part of the story. I really liked her! I want a season 2 about her in Europe and Morocco!

It was nice all the characters had their own story and not just be a part of the general story. The actors were great.

I really liked the drama in the drama, when Jin-joo and Beom So are takling about the end of each character's story. I liked the references to other dramas like Pretty Noona scene or My Country that will air after their drama :p

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Praying hard for a mini spin-off drama about Eun Jung and Director nice and warm!

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i am on board for this!

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I loved this show so much. All the characters were three-dimensional and interesting.

Plus, the emotional roller-coaster, where you are sad one moment and laughing your head off the next moment. In ep 16, where Director Ex takes a Pilates class because he wants to get good at ... arm wrestling, had me in stitches.

Melo effortlessly filled the WWW-shaped hole in my life and I am seriously wondering if any of the currently-airing dramas are good enough to get me over the ending of this one.

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My life has become an endless cycle of searching to fill the drama-shaped hole in my heart, @cloggie.

I work in public broadcasting but felt like I'd stumbled on to a completely different animal when I discovered kdramas in 2017. The emotional roller coaster might be the key to my addiction. This show had it in spades and I'm grateful for it.

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Thank you @sailorjumun for the screenshot of Eun-jung & shouty PD! Can't get enough of his "I got a nice and warm hug and you totally don't, nyahnyah!" face, LOL.
I binged this series in 2 big halves, then sat aquiver waiting for the so worth-it finale week. Love all the characters and their bantering conversations, and those quotable quotes at the end of every episode; somehow this drama gave me the feels of reading a book instead of watching.
The PPL inception & meta is smart and crazy effective for the storyline because I am a sucker for happy (or happily open) endings.
A quote from Chief PD when he was walking in the rain with Writer Jung: "When I was younger, I got lost because I didn't know. But now, I get lost pretending like I don't know." May all of us find someone/something worthy to get lost in...

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Easily the best show of 2019 for me. Even if the year hasn't ended and there were a few gems (Sky castle, Tale of nokdu), this seems to surpass them all for me.

By the end of the show, I was as envious as the director. He mentioned in his interview that he was jelous of these friends who got to live together. 20s and 30s are one of toughest times in one's life and that too very lonely. Plus most people lose contact with any of their friends in pursuit of success. This show reminded me of my time with my friends in uni, a time that I think is hard to come by. One of my favorite scenes was when all 4 of these college friends met. But I liked how realistically they showed that not every one might be happy to have that reunion again lol.

Other than that, I also loved the drama's format. If you have ever seen me write here you might know that I detest episodic shows. The one where there is one theme a single episode and then we start anew the next episode. But i loved it here. It fitted well because there wasn't a running factor that we had to look forward to (like episodic shows have that format of chasing that one serial killer or bringing that one couple together while we see other short form of stories-that makes it less different than any us/uk shows and i like how kdramas are formatted as dramas). While it could be distracting to a few people because it reduces engagement as there is nothing to look forward to- for me as JJ said, the engagement lied in the characters and I looked forward to them and their growth, which was eventually where the show was headed. This format gives me a reason to rewatch this show and thanks to the heavy dialogue, a rewatch will become easier as even if knowing what happened, it won't be tedious to watch the second time around.

I have praised the show enough and even though I had a few reservations (one of the bigger worries of people ij 20s or 30s are ageing parents and the show only slighted hinted at that plus the growth of all characters was getting them love and a partner-that was initially what the show was setup on provided it started with saranghae but love isn't necessarily the growth for everyone ) the good things surpassed the bad. I loved JJ and BS. I have never seen someone like them, but they looked so real and showed us another side of how 30 somethings could be this way too. EJ 's story was the most interesting but wrapped up the most neatly. Han Joo and JH always seemed like good friends to me (even if sparks were there) so I wasn't disappointed by their story. Infact I was really glad that JH was confronted. Even though exhausting, People tend to stay with their families in their hard times but drop friends or partners like a hot coal. HY's cheating was unforgivable but the fact that JH turned his back on her when she suffered wasn't quite right either. But like most of us JH was just trting to make things work while they got worse. It really doesn't bother me that HJ's...

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It got cut off, continued...

It really doesn't bother me that HJ's partner came out of nowhere because she wasn't meant to be with JH anyway.

All in all, this drama was great. Unworthy of only 1 percent ratings. But I'm glad it got the online buzz. I loved seeing our characters growing and making us realize that age is just a number, we all blossom at our own pace and might at one point or the other face similar issues in our life. Plus does anyone know if the osts are translated somewhere? They were all quite meaningful (gathering from the subs at viki) but aren't exactly translated anywhere. Thank you for this wonderful show and a wonderful experience. And thank ypu @sailorjumun, this show had so much content that I am surprised you even managed to divide it into two parts. But thanks to you we were able to give it a final goodbye. Till the next good show I hope we live our lives deliciously.

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Ugh sorry for the tremendous typos jealous* you* trying*

I am busy watching all the bts at JTBC drama yt channel. The bts deserves a drama of its own. The foursome are so close now and I haven't seen more relaxed or unscripted bts ever in kdramas. When hyobong(idk his real name sorry) said that we should stay in contact and HJE cried I could see how close they have become. I loved how all actors were great and gone is the time when people used to worry about actors ruining a good drama. JTBC usually has good actors lined up and somehow film actors are more nuanced that tv actors. I wonder what's the deal but they portray their characters more realistically. Not all of them were from film and musical but they deserve more attention as all were great. I hope CWH isn't discouraged to work in dramas again as both her dramas got 1 or 2 percent ratings. She is very natural and I'd like to see her along with all others more.

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Thank you, Be Melodramatic. You were such a charming, witty, raw look at life. You made me laugh at loud, cry, and empathize with the characters. You made me examine my own life.

Eun Jung's growth in the last half of this drama was great. And I loved the positive, healthy view of mental health counseling that was provided. I wasn't sure if I would like her character early on in the drama, but she easily became one of my favorites.

Such a gem of a drama. That's really all I can say. It was like a warm embrace and I loved cozying into their world every weekend. It will most likely be receiving all of my beans in a few months.

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Ah, the good times. I remember when the topic was looking at your boyfriend's phone. Beom-soo turns to the camera and scolds the viewers DON'T! Then they switch camera angles and Beom-soo is staring into a brick wall with Jin-joo asking 'What are you doing'? That's when I knew This series was going to dare to do things that other series would never do.

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I loved this show so so much. I want a season 2 so bad. The ending was so GREAT. I git so much satisfaction from it.

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Can we comment on how much *fun* Jung So-min seemed to be having in her cameo as the actress getting her nails done?

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The relationship with Jae-hoon and Ha-yoon always bothered me, it seemed so toxic, and it seemed so much to be HY's fault. But one tiny scene from early on kept niggling at my mind. Remember when Jae-Hoon and Hee-Joo go out for dinner shortly after he's been hired and they get drunk, and he gets really drunk and says some things that push the line, and he holds HJ's hands- but it's all ignored because he's drunk?
That same night he's in bed irked with HY, who isn't home yet. She stumbles in drunk and says she didn't drink that much and she's not like Jae-Hoon who never gets drunk or loses control no matter how much he drinks. The implication is that he really wasn't drunk when he was saying all those flirty things to HJ- he was sober, pretending to be drunk so he could get away with crossing the line. That's... kind of creepy. Show never revisited that and never revealed that he doesn't really get drunk, so I thought I misunderstood and forgot about it.

But when Hee Joo channels HY and tells JH all the ways he was unfair to her, I remembered and realized HY wasn't suspicious for no reason- she probably had a feeling something was off with her boyfriend for a reason.

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This is very interesting, @dhmrs! I'm so glad the show didn't romantically pair Han Joo and Jae Hoon, who was too immature. Not everybody has to marry their "work husbands." You've given me another reason to revisit the show, not that I need too much convincing.

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Hm. I read this more that he just never gets drunk or loses control with HY. I've known people like that (women do it, too), who keep the "upper hand" in a relationship by displaying perfect behavior. It's very frustrating because how do you argue against someone who doesn't make mistakes? But it isn't real, it is a type of controlling behavior, and I was blown away by the scene where Hee Joo calls him on it because I have never seen anyone called out for it IRL, ever.

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Finally got caught up with this show and finished it this evening, and I must say, I'm very happy I watched this it. And I definitely think Melo's finale ep holds the record for most consecutive journal pages of drama quotes for me. Jin Joo just wouldn't stop talking, damn it, lol.

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I loved this show so much! Very sad to see it end. My favorite episodes were the fakeout early in the series, where they kept almost touching/ kissing but then didn't, and then episode 13. So funny! So relatable! I found the Han Joo and Jae-hoon thing a little confusing. I expected them to get together, and it was weird when out of nowhere, she says that she is sort of seeing someone. How did we never see any of this? I also thought his breakup went on too long. I've known toxic couples like this IRL and I just find it depressing and exhausting. But overall, it was a great show, and would love S2 or just another series from this writer.

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I have known breakups like this, too, and I find them a lot more realistic then the ones where there is a huge fight and the couple immediately break up and never see each other again...human beings are hopeful creatures, we always like to think that things can be fixed, repaired, made whole again.
I also liked the fact that Be Melo didn't try to cover every relationship in exhaustive detail - also unrealistic - so we got the healthy relationships (not much to say about those, really) like the brother and his BF/husband and Han Joo's new flame just summarized.

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Commenters seem to be in denial about that scene at the movie theater where Jae-hoon bumps into his ex. They both seemed to be looking for an excuse to reconnect. Ha-yoon was noticeably disappointed that they weren't sitting together. The thing about troublesome couples that break-up/reunite, breakup/reunite is the relation ship never really quite ends.

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OK, I loved this show, too...except for the ending.

I realize I am in the minority here, but I was really dismayed that Eun Jung was letting Director Yeller into her life. That guy was plastered with red flags from head to toe! I don't care if he donates every last penny he makes to orphans, or if he is sometimes unexpectedly silly and cute - he was just Trouble (yes, that's with a capital T) of the toxic variety.

Ragey, abusive, controlling, rude...it cannot be a sign of her improving mental/emotional health that she is letting this guy in.

I also was not in favor of the toxic relationship between Jae-hoon and Ha-yoon starting again being shown as in any way hopeful. They need to leave each other alone, have some therapy, and continue their growth alone or with other people. It would be way too easy for them to slip into their old habits of behavior and continue their awful dynamic.

I feel like the writer of this show was far too optimistic and naive about these two potential couples. (I have no opinion about Han Joo and her new boyfriend - we have no data about him. We don't even know if he was Club Guy.)

That sounds like big criticism, but I really did love a lot of this show otherwise.

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