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Human Disqualification: Episode 9

There’s a lot of third-wheeling this episode – or at least, feeling like the third wheel. Our characters all struggle to find their places within complicated relationships, leading to all sorts of feelings. There’s the jealousy of being on the outside, the shame of being a pushover, the helplessness of being unable to provide protection or comfort, and the grief of loss. Relationships are hard.

 
EPISODE 9: “Three people”

We open on Bu-jung’s monologue to Ah-ran about who has the right to be human and the privileges that right bestows. That right, Bu-jung argues, that Ah-ran has and she does not. While Ah-ran sleeps in Jong-hoon’s car, he looks through the photos Manager Ahn sent of Bu-jung and Kang-jae. He thinks of the lies Kang-jae has told him.

In a flashback, Bu-jung is with Ah-ran at Akira. While she handles Ah-ran’s affairs, Jong-hoon runs interference to ensure customers don’t see Ah-ran at the club. Now, as Ah-ran sleeps, Bu-jung gets a medical exam done and wonders if that qualified human even exists.

When Ah-ran wakes up, she’s ready to go right back to work, although Jong-hoon wishes she wouldn’t. Ah-ran argues living is about doing things you hate, too. Jong-hoon starts to bring up Bu-jung but decides against it.

At the pharmacy, both siblings pine for their crushes. When Ddak-yi can’t get ahold of Kang-jae, his thoughts wander to the fact that Min-jung used to crash at Kang-jae’s place. Soon-kyu ruminates on how Woo-nam went running when his pretty ex-wife was sick.

Soon-kyu tells Ddak-yi off for being too distracted to help her stock the shelves. The siblings have a petty argument about who’s worse, but their fighting is interrupted when a customer arrives. Soon-kyu freezes and exchanges an awkward greeting.

She introduces Ddak-yi to Woo-nam’s ex Ji-yeon who came looking for Woo-nam. He won’t answer his phone, so she hoped to catch him at home. Soon-kyu tries to hold her off while Ddak-yi tries to get ahold of Woo-nam who’s asleep after his night shift.

At the filming site, Jong-hoon lurks and scoffs at Jin-seob dispensing his actorly wisdom to his young, female colleagues. When he and Jin-seob run into each other in the bathroom, Jong-hoon glares daggers while saying he’s a fan. Pfft.

Meanwhile, Ddak-yi creeps downstairs, avoiding the living room where Woo-nam is effectively icing Ji-yeon out. In the kitchen, Soon-kyu is rummaging for the nice tea set Ddak-yi bought her with his first paycheck.

Ddak-yi worries he’ll be late for work, but she begs him not to leave her here alone. They can both duck out after they serve tea. He sighs sadly as he watches Soon-kyu hurriedly put on makeup to hide her dark circles.

At work, Jung-soo consults with his life advisor Joon-hyuk about Bu-jung’s dinner refusal. Joon-hyuk thinks it’s normal to have late meetings, but he recalls Jung-soo saying Bu-jung never apologizes.

Jung-soo argues that she never apologizes because she’s always right. He’ll often start off thinking he’s right, but after reflection, he inevitably realizes that Bu-jung is right. They’re both baffled by why she apologized about not going to dinner, then.

Joon-hyuk suggests Jung-soo take some of her favorite snacks to her office. Uh-oh. Jung-soo used to do that often when she’d work late, but he hasn’t stopped by her office in years.

At the hospital, Bu-jung sits the with gynecologist for her first follow-up since being hospitalized. It’s been one year to the day since her miscarriage. The doctor reminds her how serious her situation was – she had a miscarriage at an advanced maternal age and ended up with an infection that led to surgery.

She was hospitalized for a long time and was spent five weeks with her baby, so of course that led to mental and physical trauma. The doctor emphasizes that Bu-jung isn’t at fault and encourages her to share any pain she’s having. Bu-jung cries silently.

As she waits to pay her bill, Bu-jung stares at the text about Min-soo’s death. She watches a nearby little gaggle of kids in hospital gowns. Bu-jung walks through the pediatric ward while Kang-jae reads her long reply to Jung-woo. She’s not sure how to comfort him and apologizes for being clueless and unable to help.

Kang-jae looks through a few photos among Jung-woo’s belongings. He flips through Min-soo’s many medical bills and sighs.

While Jung-soo buys macarons for Bu-jung, a small group prays and sings hymns at Kyung-eun’s husband’s bedside. Across the city, Ah-ran acts yet another scene where she is abused and drags herself up for some PPL coffee afterward. At the closed pharmacy, Soon-kyu sits alone.

Bu-jung narrates that she can’t fathom the exact agony Jung-woo must be going through. Even though her pain was comparably less, can he understand her a little? Kang-jae finds a bankbook for Min-soo’s savings account and sees that Bu-jung made multiple deposits. “Would you forgive me a little?” Bu-jung asks.

In the hospital, the nurse who took that photo of Bu-jung with Min-soo and Hee-sun sees Bu-jung in the hallway. But she’s called away before she can say hi.

Bu-jung ignores a call from Jung-soo and doesn’t look at his texts until she’s in the taxi. He sent a photo of the macarons and wants to know if he should wait for her or leave them in her office. Jung-soo ends up going inside and runs into Bu-jung’s ex-colleague who’s put in the awkward position of either pretending Bu-jung still works there or telling him the truth.

Based on Jung-soo’s stunned expression as he leaves, she told him the truth. In the car, he texts Bu-jung that he’ll wait for her outside. When she arrives and pretends to come out of the building, he plays along with her lies and drives her home. He asks if she ate and remarks that she looks tired.

Bu-jung asks if he knows what today is. Jung-soo is silent for a moment before saying he does. “The baby was mine too.” They both blink away tears.

Jung-soo wonders if Chang-sook has eaten. He bought him a pair of shoes he has yet to give him. Bu-jung encourages him to call. “Dad is even happier to hear from you than from me.” Jung-soo says the same is true of his mom – she’s happier to hear from Bu-jung.

In his apartment, Kang-jae stares at the flower he kept from that piece of cake. Ddak-yi texts him a link to Min-jung’s live broadcast about living at an internet café for a week. Kang-jae chuckles and turns it off after a minute, but Ddak-yi is invested. He even ignores a call from Soon-kyu so he can keep watching.

Ji-yeon is still at their place for some reason – it’s super awkward as she and Woo-nam sit in front of the TV silently – and Soon-kyu understandably doesn’t want to go inside. She calls Woo-nam, but he doesn’t pick up and just texts back that he’ll talk to her soon.

Elsewhere, Bu-jung and Jung-soo go to her father’s together for the first time in a year. She reminds him they stopped coming together after his affair. It was embarrassing. Jung-soo bristles at that.

Jung-soo hangs back to take a call from his mom. He starts panicking when he hears her ragged breathing, but she’s just hula hooping. Jung-soo sits at the end of the hall (right outside Kang-jae’s apartment) and tells her he went to Bu-jung’s office today.

He heard from Bu-jung’s colleague that an older woman he assumes is Min-ja called and asked a bunch of questions. He hasn’t talked to Bu-jung yet and asks Min-ja not to tell Chang-sook. “Bu-jung is father’s whole world just like I’m your whole world,” Jung-soo says.

Jung-soo can hear Min-ja crying on the other end and worries she already told Chang-sook, but she lies that she didn’t. Meanwhile, Kang-jae gets a notification that his mom sent him his monthly allowance.

Soon-kyu returns home to an empty house that night. She goes into the kitchen and sees one of the nice teacups Ddak-yi bought her broken in the trash. Woo-nam arrives shortly after and explains they accidently broke it when cleaning up.

She stares at the cup with tears in her eyes. Is this his house where he can throw the cup away as he wishes? Just like how he includes her one minute and throws her away whenever he wishes, too. “Am I yours?” Soon-kyu’s voice breaks but she says firmly that she may like him one-sidedly, “But I’m mine.”

Soon-kyu turns away and buries her face in her arm as she cries. Woo-nam tears up listening to her heartrending sobs and wraps his arms around her.

Back at the apartment, Kang-jae almost walks into Bu-jung in the hallway as she steps out of her father’s. They lock eyes, and Kang-jae swiftly walks by before Jung-soo sees him. He tries to take the elevator down first, but it doesn’t come quickly enough.

Kang-jae spins around looking for a place to hide, but there’s nowhere to go. He settles for standing on the far side and turning his back to them when they arrive, which does little good because Chang-sook immediately spots him.

As usual, Kang-jae and Bu-jung studiously ignore each other while Chang-sook makes small talk. When Kang-jae says he’s going to his parents’ house, Chang-sook is all, “You have parents?!” Bu-jung is horrified and scolds her dad, but Chang-sook assures Kang-jae he was surprised in a positive way. Ha.

Things get even more awkward when it’s just Kang-jae, Bu-jung, and Jung-soo riding the elevator down. Kang-jae wonders to himself what to say. “What words do you need?” He slinks to the corner and buries his head in his phone (ignoring a call from Jong-hoon) until the doors open.

Kang-jae continues in voiceover that he doesn’t know anything about the hell she’s experiencing and can’t be of any help. He’s not sure how he can provide the forgiveness she asked for. Jung-soo remarks that Kang-jae seems familiar, which Bu-jung suggests is natural since he lives down the hall.

“Does sadness have a shape?” Kang-jae wonders. Jung-soo realizes he left his employee ID at Chang-sook’s, so Bu-jung tries calling her dad. When he doesn’t pick up, she goes back up to his apartment. Regardless of the scale, Kang-jae muses, no pain hurts like one’s own.

Bu-jung finds Chang-sook sitting in the hall outside his door. He looks so small and lost. Chang-sook nods when she asks if he forgot his code and explains he has to wait 10 minutes to put in the code again. Bu-jung wraps her scarf around his neck and sits beside him.

Chang-sook says he put pieces of paper with the code in his coat, vest, and even shoes, but they’re all inside. Bu-jung smiles and calls her dad a pro. She texts Jung-soo to go home without her – she’ll stay with her dad tonight.

Bu-jung tries to help Chang-sook think of what the code might be, asking if it’s his birthday. That jogs his memory, and he brightens as he says it’s her birthday. She laughs and calls him a genius as they head inside.

“Was today another day filled with agony?” Kang-jae walks to his mom’s and says his day was unbearably long. Mi-sun and Chang-kyu are busy cleaning the house, preparing for his visit. She beams when she sees Kang-jae out the window, like by showing up he just gave her the world.

Mi-sun even cooked a simple meal but worries it’s not enough. Kang-jae looks down at the ground, his hair covering his face. Without a word, he gets up and walks off. Chang-kyu is shocked, but Mi-sun stares after her son knowingly and says he just went to buy coffee-flavored milk.

Kang-jae narrates it’s been a day where nothing happened and tomorrow feels like it’ll never arrive. “In a dark room where no one came, I faced the fact that nothing is mine and became lonely.” Kang-jae wipes his tears under the light of a streetlamp. He’s not sure if it’s the right thing to say, but he’s sorry.


 
COMMENTS

It’s always the homecooked meal that does it. I really hope Kang-jae lets down his guard with his mom more. The fact that he went to see her after having a rough day is telling. And Mi-sun wants to do the mom thing so badly, but he always keeps her at a distance. Kang-jae withdraws whenever he’s reminded of his father or things get too sentimental. He still comes home, but he never looks at ease there. Kang-jae is simultaneously stuck in the past yet running from it. He disconnects emotionally so as to avoid dealing with the loss and change in his family. Until Kang-jae faces his past head-on, he’ll never be able to move forward. Maybe now that Bu-jung has started opening up to him about her trauma, he’ll be more willing to talk about his own.

Speaking of Bu-jung, her secret is now out – her whole family knows she’s no longer working at the publishing house. Jung-soo handled the fact that she’s been lying to him better than I anticipated. It would’ve been fair for him to get angry at her, but instead he took a step back to consider everyone’s feelings. I have to say, I have warmed to him a little. He’s made mistakes and can be inadvertently insensitive, but he tries. In fact, he seems to be trying harder with Bu-jung lately. Did Kyung-eun’s situation with her dying husband shift his priorities? Or maybe he’s just finally processed his own grief over what happened a year ago. The miscarriage might not have been as traumatic for him as it was for Bu-jung, but it still had an impact. It’s not surprising that the two of them drifted even further apart as they each dealt with the loss in their own ways.

I was a little confused when the doctor mentioned that Bu-jung spent five weeks with her baby. If that’s the case, it sounds like the baby wasn’t stillborn but died after a premature birth. Learning what Bu-jung went through in more detail sheds light on her reaction. A miscarriage would be hard enough but having serious medical complications and having the baby die after birth could make it that much more traumatic. Knowing that she spent so much time hospitalized also explains how she got to know Min-soo and Hee-sun. Bu-jung seemed to really bond with Min-soo – she even deposited money in his savings account. Did she meet Jung-woo at the hospital as well, or is there more to their story?

On another note, this episode is the first time I really connected to Soon-kyu. Her and Woo-nam’s storyline has felt so tangential to the main plot that it’s been hard to feel invested. But Soon-kyu had a moment this episode. We’ve seen hints that she’s overlooked and underappreciated, but the weight of that hit this hour. Her feelings for Woo-nam are painfully obvious, and it was inconsiderate of him to spend the entire day awkwardly holed up with Ji-yeon in Soon-kyu’s house. He could’ve taken Ji-yeon elsewhere, but as usual, Soon-kyu was expected to accommodate. With all the lying and hiding going on, Soon-kyu’s vulnerable honesty was even more impactful. I loved seeing her assert her own worth, reminding Woo-nam (and herself) that she is her own person who belongs to no one but herself. Now if we can just get everyone else to tap into some of that personal honesty.

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This is interesting because I interpreted those "5 weeks" so that Bu-yeong's baby had died in the womb and she had carried a dead fetus for 5 weeks before she actually miscarried. This is something that can happen and, in fact, the fetus dies and stays inside for a prolonged period of time, it can be quite dangerous to the mother; for example, it can induce heavy bleeding (and since Bu-yeong was taken to the hospital due to heavy bleeding, I connected these two).

But I might be wrong, of course.

I do kind of like Sung-ju. It's pretty much what has already been said; he HAS done mistakes and he can be incensitive and occasionally somewhat slow. However, he clearly genuinely means well, he is able to reflect upon his actions and realise when he's in the wrong and apologise (this is really important - so many ppl fail in this) and he doesn't only try. He KEEPS ON TRYING. Bu-yeong constantly shuts him down and STILL he keeps on trying. And he doesn't get angry at Bu-yeong for her constant rebuffs, doesn't guilt-trip her, doesn't demand response or anything. He just tries to be more understanding and kind to her. He's no saint, obviously, but he does have some very good qualities.

Don't get me wrong, I do not blame Bu-yeong in the least for rebuffing Sung-ju. She is clearly depressed and is going through a lot.

I guess I just kind of find the situation very sad because you can see where both of them are coming from and you kind of wish they'd connect and be happy but at the same time it's obvious why it isn't happening.

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You are absolutely right about what the gynecologist said to FL. She miscarried the baby at 20 weeks but the baby’s heart stopped 5 weeks prior, and she carried the dead baby in her womb. “Just two of you in the dark room for 5 weeks” means her and the dead baby alone in the dark womb. She spent a month in the hospital because the infection from the dead fetus started earlier than miscarriage on the day she was hit and pushed. What baffles me, is that the doctor said she was considered a high risk pregnancy (due to her age) when miscarriages are common after 20 weeks. Then how in the world they didn’t detect the baby’s heart stopped? South Korea is highly advanced in medicine and prenatal care field . High risk patients are advised to visit their gynecologist every two weeks. Was she too busy with work? The undetected infection could have killed her. So the actress’ assault on our FL saved her life? Is that what the director/ writer telling us?

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Even when the doctors know the baby has died, sometimes women have to go to full term before the baby is delivered. I understood that the assault killed the baby.

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The thing is, we don't know this. If the assault had killed the baby she would have gone to the hospital, they would have found the heartbeat had stopped and removed the foetus. She was only 5 months pregnant. Instead, the baby died and she hid the fact for five weeks until the resulting infection was so bad that she will never conceive again. If the assault was that bad, she would have been hospitalised at the time and none of this would have ever happened. Or... maybe it did? We don't actually know.

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They better not take away the FL’s righteous revenge (assault) and change the reason for baby’s untimely demise.
True. I’ve heard of such cases: carrying the dead baby longer due to some medical reasons. In some states abortions are done up to 9 months and even after live birth. Meaning the baby is allowed to die if mother decides she doesn’t want it any longer. So I don’t see how they wouldn’t preform the abortion with the dead fetus when they do it on daily bases with the live ones. Sorry for the gruesome details - it’s an every day life in the US.

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Like @Arawn I understood that the baby died (from a heart attack in utero), and she carried it for five weeks before it was delivered.

Once again, sharing food is important. Jung-soo tried to take the macaroons to Bu-jung, but it's a big miss, like the cake left in the car in the previous episode. Jung-soo seems to be trying, His guilt is profound. But they keep missing each other. The husband cannot meet the needs of his wife, even though he is trying. Similarly, Mi-sun can only provide the most basic and uninspired meal for Kang-jae, and he goes to the shop for milk. Milk of all things. The mother cannot meet her son's needs. Both Bu-jung and Kang-jae need someone who can satisfy their emptiness.

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About the baby - I thought the baby died inside the womb due to a myocardial infraction and she was holed up in a room with a dead child for 5 weeks which lead to a severe infection.

That was just painful to hear. No wonder it’s so hard for her and she isn’t able to move on or forgive Ah Ran for what happened. Add to that a possible affair by her husband. Atleast they both mentioned it this week. She called him out on the affair and he spoke about the child.
Jung Soo is definitely making an attempt after her dad told him to look at her carefully.

That last scene. Kang-jae 💔. I really hope he and his mother can have a meal and talk a little
Bit. Even the step dad seems like a decent chap. No reason for him to choose loneliness when he can meet his mother. Are we going to get more interactions between him and BJ next week.

I don’t know why she lets Woo Nam stay with her if she knows he would never reciprocate her feelings. I felt so bad for her this episode. To tip toe around her own home. Nope. I wished she went In confidently and stayed in her home comfortably. It was Woo Nam who should have left. And what’s the deal with the ex???

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I was gobsmacked that she was so displaced in/outside her own home. But she made her point over the broken tea cup (Buckingham Palace style lol).

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This episode. Grief and parents. The specific grief seeming to be things or beings you want but can't have. In BJ and JS's case it was their child who died before they could say hello. It is unfortunate they don't really show JS's grief, I'm curious if he cheated before, during, or after her pregnancy. The other grief is SK not being able to have WN. She is always the third wheel even though he is divorced. The only way to have a sense of identity and sanity is to claim herself for herself or she will be completely lost to him, in order to live she needs that. Parents, my goodness. Every parent had me emotional. To love without understanding someone is hard, but you do it anyway. Parents to children and children to parents. This show, damn.

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I didn't understand the baby death. The baby died naturally in her womb and nothing was done during 5 weeks, she miscarried, then she has an infection and they had to operate on her. Five weeks seems a long period without a check-up and without her knowing about it.

I would like a timeline for this drama. Because it's hard to understand what happened when and what were the consequences for the characters.

Her husband was in contact with his ex before or after their baby's death? He said they moved from his mother's house because of that.

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I no longer trust this director and the script writer to tell me a coherent story that makes me feel for its characters. Like someone said before, it’s just a sadness porn with no logic. I can add to it that it’s also a covert ode to suicide.
When there is an original source for a drama, I always try to investigate, read it in order to better understand the script writer’s or director’s mind. What are they trying to convey to the audience? Why? This drama is (very) loosely based on the autobiographical novel No Longer Human by the famous Japanese author Osamu Dazai. He was mentally and physically ill, drug addicted, alcoholic and obsessed with suicide. He tried to commit it numerous times until he succeeded in 1948 before age 40. In the process of trying to drown himself in various lakes and canals, Osamu Dazai managed to kill three innocent women. He would talk them into jumping into the water with him. The last woman got smart and tied them together when they jumped in the water, so he wouldn’t try to swim away from her.
Now I understand why the director picked poor Jeff Buckley’s Hallelujah for the theme song - because it’s documented that he jumped into the water before finally dying in it (he said it was for fun) a few times before, just like Osamu Dazai

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By the statistics, Korea leads all other countries in female suicides. It’s by all means a very serious and urgent topic. But I don’t see how this particular male author’s story, and specifically the story’s title, can help with a suicide dialogue when he physically pulled 3 women into the water with him and killed them out of boredom. That’s one of the reasons why he called himself no longer human in his autobiographical last novel. He killed himself and his lover after finishing it. Why use the name for this drama? In which way our ML compares to such mental depravity? Knowing the original source writer’s guilt in pushing women (including his wife, he made her miserable, left her with 2 kids) to suicide, and watching the drama’s FL standing and staring into the lake, makes me furious and sick to my stomach.

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One more thing that I can’t overlook in this drama as mental health professional. If someone you love or think is in love with you asks you to commit suicide together, it’s not romantic- it’s mental and verbal abuse. Some people get off sexually and emotionally by making loved ones sad and watch them spiral into depression. Just a warning from some of my cases. It’s equally true for romantic relationships and for siblings, mostly sisters or close female cousins.

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Was there some scene where this was positioned to be romantic? Yeah, Kang-jae asked this from Bu-yeong but I did not read it as romantic at all. The whole scene in the hotel was not romantic, in my opinion.

I read it as part cry for help, part probing on his part bc he knew what his friend did and that Bu-yeong had been in contact with said friend.

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Couldn’t have said better than this critic. No Longer Human: “a gruesome contract”

https://www.craftliterary.com/2020/05/12/extremely-disorganized-life-peter-selgin/

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This episode in particular just felt to me like an orgy of directionless sadness.

At least grief has a focus and a path to working through it. Sadness is just... there. Sometimes for no clear reason. The female lead at least has clear clinical depression, she should be being treated for that. But many of the characters don't even know why they're sad or can't explain their sadness. Which means the whole thing is like mist. As an audience we're just floundering in their insubstantial sadness as much as they are.

Which means... it's good? I guess? If it's evoking the emotion it means to? But at some point a drama does need to give us something to hold onto.

Soon-kyu's plotline in particular is just a general sadness for no clear reason. And she even knows that she's upset about nothing and that makes her more upset. Which I actually like - depression and sadness and anxiety don't always have to be linked to some great trauma. Sometimes we're just miserable because we're miserable. And in many ways that's worse since there's no solution for it but to just keep going forward with life

But we spent so long in her... nothing... this episode and I don't think the actor is giving us enough to justify it.

I'm kind of impressed you manage to recap this at all @quirkycase since there's no narrative here to tease out. There's not even any profound character moments either. it's just a canvassing of sad.

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Somewhat wonder if Soon-kyu's past speeches to her brother were things she wanted to hear herself. Funny enough, the real icing on the cake to them taking over the house for me was how they didn't clean the tea cups and put the dirty one in the sink. They were expecting Soon-kyu to clean their dishes too on top of everything else? Pah.

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So I suddenly find myself wondering if Jong-hoon, the Akira club owner/manager, is actually Ah-ran's son. I don't think we've seen her actually contact her son in Canada and she has mentioned that she hasn't seen him for 20 or so years. I have no idea if she knows what he would look like now if she hasn't seen him for that long. There's just something about their particular relationship dynamic.

I too was particularly surprised at Jung-soo's reaction, when Bu-jung got into the car at her former workplace. He knows the truth but he didn't press the issue. I'll be honest and say that I was ready for him to start throwing out 30 questions about what happened.

The person who needs to start asking all sorts of questions is Soon-kyu. It was so upsetting to see her actually be anxious about entering her own home! Her own home!! I can't believe how Woo-nam and his ex think this is acceptable behavior on their part. Does he not have a home where he can have visitors?? Soon-hyu needs to start setting some ground rules for her home, for her relationship with Woo-nam but most of all, for herself.

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I always thought Jong-hoon was closer to Ae-rans age than would make the son thing possible, he seems incredibly loyal probably through long association and being able to relate to each other. Both of their jobs entail being a good-looking, adaptable commodity subject to others whims.

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Some people are saying that this episode was just directionless sadness. Maybe. I'm not too bothered, though, because honestly, in my opinion, this is quite common nowadays. So many people are sad/gloomy/depressed without a "good reason". And by that I mean something that outside world would accept as a "proper" reason, such as miscarriage, a life falling apart or horrible home condition while growing up.

Kang-jae here doesn't really have a "good" reason to be so sad, disconnected and depressed. Yes, I do know that his father died and it was traumatic for him - and maybe lot of his issues do stem from that root. But otherwise things seem pretty ok for him, no? And yet he is so disconnected from everything.

I think that is or could be the point. How often there are cases of people who seemingly had everything going for them and yet "out of nowhere" committed suicide leaving their loved-ones to find out that, in fact, they were suffering from debilitating depression. People can suffer and be depressed and utterly detached even if their lives are not a carnivale of everything going wrong. And I think that is one of the great tragedies of life. And, also the reason why I'm on board with Kang-jae's condition.

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Very true so often depression has no reason

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