Beanie level: Contract girlfriend

PRC vs. ROK: Battle of the Boy Bands

Watch Maga: “CCP Goes K-Pop”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HZNt0kbRiio

In cahoots with the Backstreet Boys, the People’s Liberation Army takes on Hallyu (MORE)

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KING MAKER: THE CHANGE OF DESTINY / WIND, CLOUDS, AND RAIN, Ep. 20

Queen Min’s oppa sentenced to janghyeong?!
https://ubitto.com/blog/korean-words-in-historical-dramas-you-should-know/

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    BEWARE OF SPOILERS!

    The subtitles I’ve been reading didn’t translate janghyeong. Thanks to Evangeline See’s handy-dandy glossary, I now know that nanjanghyeong means flogging, which Sageuk Geeks know can be fatal.

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      I recall from NOKDU FLOWER that Queen Min’s brother, Min Young-joon (played by Choi Dae-hoon), appeared in a few later scenes. Thus I suspect that KING MAKER’S Min Seung-ho did not survive the flogging meted out to him and his Andong Kim buddies. I’ll chalk up the disparity in the generational name to poetic license.

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    @pakalanapikake,
    I hope you are well. Sorry I am a little late to this post. Thanks for the link. Perhaps because of your language background you find some great language/linguistics sites.
    I found the writer’s choice of sageuk terms interesting. I wouldn’t have thought ‘flogging’ would make the top 12 to discuss but there you go. I liked that YSY’s image was used in the Grand Prince definition. Lol. Good taste.
    I really enjoyed KING MAKER. What a performance from Jun Kwang-ryul! Maybe not pc nowadays to say this but I thought Park Si-Yoo gave a fine performance and held his own with JKR which is saying something considering the way JKR dominated his scenes.

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      Aloha, @marcusnyc20 bong-soo!
      Thank you so much for touching base. I hope you’ve been okay over in Queens during the excitement Tropical Storm Isaias brought us. All the surrounding municipalities — and even most of the rest of our own little dorf — lost electrical power. By an odd quirk, our neighborhood, which is situated in a sheltered saddle between hills and has buried utility lines, only lost power 3-4 times for very brief periods throughout the day on Tues., 8/04. My folks’ house (about a 20-min. drive to the east) lost electricity and the landline at about noon that day and was dead in the water for 32 hours (power was restored last evening), but otherwise my namdongsaeng was safe. Yeodongsaeng up in Woostah was also okay. Our Dad had been released from the hospital on Monday afternoon and sent back to the subacute rehab where he has been getting physical therapy following a partial hip replacement about 2 weeks ago after falling on Mother’s Day when taking flowers to Mom’s grave. He didn’t know he’d broken it for about 7 weeks, but was deathly afraid of going to a hospital because of Covid-19, so went home and put up with it until namdongsaeng was at the end of his own rope. I didn’t blame Dad after the carnage in nursing homes in NY and Florida. God has been good, and he is recovering well and making excellent progress. He’s nearly 94 and highly motivated to regain his ambulation and condition after being bedridden for 7 weeks. Last week he had a spell that was apparently brought on by low sodium levels, and that sent him off to the hospital for a few days.

      I was relieved that he was not at home when the storm hit. There have been several other power outages in recent years. One of them during the winter lasted for a week or more. Luckily, one of my buddies invited me and Mr. P to crash at her place when we lost power, but I asked if Dad and bro, who was still working in retail, could take refuge instead. She ended up thanking me for lending her my kinfolk. Her own dad had died when she was a young teen, and it was a treat for her to have a pseudo-Dad and pseudo-bro around. They all had a lovely time, and Mr. P and I were relieved that they were in good hands. I was afraid Dad would get pneumonia if he stayed at home.

      I’m way behind on Kdrama watching, and still haven’t seen the subtitles for the final two episodes of KING MAKER: THE CHANGE OF DESTINY. I’ve been a little under the weather (not with that virus, AFAIK), but have not had the mental energy to watch any Kdramas since July 29. — I’ve also been kind of emerging from hibernation and returning to real life after about 4 years of hiding out in Kdramaland. It was a necessary hiatus, but now I feel my ch’i shifting. I’ve been on a long-overdue cleaning spree. I swear, I feel as if aliens abducted me, and I’m really a changeling. (But if I were truly a changeling, how would I ever know?!) I’ve also been cooking up a storm, something I quit doing years ago.

      MORE

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      Continued, Part 2

      I’ve knocked myself out with the cleaning and cooking more than once over the past week or two. Our dishwasher conked out a month or so ago, so I’ve been handwashing the dishes, and have found it to be oddly relaxing and meditative, even as my feet and joints kill me. I used to enjoy cooking, and just this week whomped up my second big batch of pasta sauce loaded with fresh zucchini and summer squash, carrots, celery, and onions, with Aussie grassfed ground beef in a base of tomato basil sauce (all organic to minimize pesticide exposure). I’ve also been enjoying live lactofermented sauerkraut with various wurst, and am about to cook pork with apples and bosc pears in ye olde south German manner. Mr. P found me a bottle of Belgian Trappist brown ale (Chimay Premiere Red Dubbel brewed at Scourmont Abbey), and I think I’ll be enjoying a bit of it with dinner later tonight. One of my faves. 😉

      Back to Kdrama: I’m so glad you enjoyed the linguistics post. I literally saw only the first 15-18 minutes of ep. 20 because the lack of a translation for janghyeong stopped me in my tracks and sent me off on a quest for terminology. I was so frustrated! Then I got distracted with real life, and too tired to focus.

      I did manage to see the end of MY UNFAMILIAR FAMILY, which was one of the most interesting family dramas I’ve seen in a long time. It repeatedly dodged my expectations, and had a fine ensemble cast. I consider it a pretty realistic cautionary tale. I felt cheated that there was not more of Shin Dong-wook in it, but I enjoyed his portrayal of Mr. Player — who was certainly not what he appeared to be at first blush. I was able to keep up with IT’S OKAY TO NOT BE OKAY for a week or two after KING MAKER ended, and then got distracted. Ditto for TRAIN, whose finale I may have missed by now since it’s only 12 episodes. I’ve lost track of MEN ARE MEN with Yoon Hyun-min, Seo Ji-hoon, and Hwang Jung-eum, which I had been enjoying. I want to catch up on all of my shows. I haven’t even seen the premiere episode of FLOWER OF EVIL, so will probably be booted out of the Lee Joon-gi fan club.

      I had already finished KKONDAE INTERN (and was recently inspired by it to conduct my own taste test of Nong Shim’s Shin Ramyun Black and Paldo’s fiery garlic NAMJA RAMYUN — for Science!), which I enjoyed very much. Kim Eung-soo is one of my fave ajusshis and sageuk actors. SWEET MUNCHIES frustrated me in certain ways with the missed opportunities and doofy characters. I felt as if Jung Il-woo’s character was assassinated, and was pissed at leading lady Kang Ji-young’s character, but not her performance. I got such a kick out of seeing Kim Seung-su as the senior director — what a contrast with his cutthroat Kim Byeong-woon of the Andong Kim clan in KING MAKER! It was such a treat to see him facing off against his erstwhile Dad, Prince Kumhwa of JUMONG).

      (MORE)

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        @bong-soo,
        I’ll be back with Part 3 but have to get cracking on making dinner. It’ll be a while — perhaps not until tomorrow or so. Stay tuned for further pontificating. 😉

        Again, hope that all’s well with you in the wake of Isaias. Take care! 😉

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MY UNFAMILIAR FAMILY, Ep. 14

Art Garfunkel: “All I Know” (monaural radio mix, 1973)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oZZMxuj

For Sang-shik, Miss Sook, & their kids.

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    Omg, I love this song. I must have sung it along with him a million times when I was young.

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      @bbstl,
      “All I Know” is so apropos after the end of ep. 14 that I had to mention it. Miss Sook probably knows it well. I could imagine Sang-shik playing it for her — if only he knew that she liked it.

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MY UNFAMILIAR FAMILY, Ep. 13

Simon & Garfunkel: “El Condor Pasa (If I Could)” (Bridge Over Troubled Water LP, 1970)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1PKzDvqxAiE

Andean folk group Los Incas (MORE)

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    Andean folk group Los Incas accompanied them on traditional instruments. They later toured with Simon.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Los_Incas

    Did Miss Sook dig “The Sound Of Silence”? According to Artie G., the song is about the inability to communicate emotionally — which would make it the theme song of the Kim family. “I Am A Rock” would give it a run for the money.

    S&G: “The Sound Of Silence” (Sounds Of Silence LP, 1966; single 1965)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bjkPQYWNTlg

    Garfunkel once summed up the song’s meaning as “the inability of people to communicate with each other, not particularly internationally but especially emotionally, so what you see around you are people unable to love each other.”[6]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sound_of_Silence#In_popular_culture

    I could imagine Sang-shik playing this next one for Miss Sook if she’d ever told him she liked S&G’s music. It hit #5 on the Billboard and Cash Box charts in the US.

    S&G: “Homeward Bound” (Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme LP, 1966)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R4EnErMCKrI
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homeward_Bound_(Simon_%26_Garfunkel_song)

    S&G: The Concert in Central Park (recorded 09/19/1981)
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLcEOcG701ypJURKeCo9FFLuMEAyUS9eKk
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Concert_in_Central_Park

    Fun fact: Paul Simon co-wrote The Cyrkle’s 1966 hit “Red Rubber Ball.” Still an earworm 54 years later. And I’m still crazy after all these years. 😉
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a9aHrgtf2zY

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      Oh, and my school friends and I have a closed messaging group, where we call ourselves still crazy after all these years…

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    Thanks for the share, paka! I have a near obsession with S&G and was so delighted when the reference was made in what is my current favourite drama, I was jumping up and down like a crazy fangirl.

    I also really really love Paul Simon’s solo work. IMO, he is one of the greatest American songwriter-musicians of the 20th century. I don’t know what went through the heads of the Nobel Committee folks when they decided to award Bob Dylan the prize for literature/songwriting, when Paul Simon was there too.

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      You’re most welcome, @pickleddragon. S&G were among my faves as a kid with her first transistor radio. I still recall the shock of their parting company. Talk about going out with a bang at the height of their game. At the time of their reunion concert in Central Park, I was living in Hawaii, and probably only read about it after the fact in Rolling Stone. I’m feeling groovy to be able to watch that concert footage on YT nowadays.

      I don’t know what the deal is with the Nobel Prize selections. I suspect that Bob Dylan’s close early association with the folk revival in the US in the 1950s may have put him in a more influential/pivotal position than Paul Simon, but I really don’t know how the committee makes its decisions. Consider the meltdown he caused among folk aficionados when he performed an electric set at the Newport Folk Festival 55 years ago on July 25, 1965. In doing so, he helped birth a new hybrid American folk music that was essentially a “shot heard round the world.” In the process, he wrested it from the grasp of those who would immure it in academic amber. Crossing the parent streams from the British Isles, Ireland, Scotland, and francophone Acadia with the musical and storytelling traditions brought from Africa and transformed into the many flavors of jazz, blues, gospel, swing, and rock and roll gave American folk music a bigger pallet, and more grist for the mill. And it set off a chain reaction overseas. Fairport Convention became acclaimed purveyors of electrified British Folk, but didn’t stop there.

      Paul Simon has made an enormous contribution to the ethical cross-pollination of American music with such diverse ethnic traditions as reggae, Andean music, and the dynamic South African choral music epitomized by Ladysmith Black Mambazo. And lest we forget: the peerless black gospel harmonies of the Dixie Hummingbirds. Admittedly, I haven’t kept up with his output in recent decades. So much music (and too many Kdramas), and so little time. 😉

      I’d like to nominate American songwriter Jimmy Webb, who since his teens has penned some of the most moving music and lyrics to grace the airwaves.

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        Yes, of course, Electric Dylan is legendary!

        Country music is not a form I have particularly warmed up to, and as a result, not heard much by Jimmy Webb, but ‘Wichita Lineman’ is one of those numbers that stays in your head forever.

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          @pickleddragon,
          You may have heard more music by singer-songwriter Jimmy Webb than you realize. “Up, Up And Away” by the Fifth Dimension and “MacArthur Park” by Richard Harris aren’t even remotely country. Frank Sinatra called “By The Time I GEtr To Phoenix” the “greatest torch song ever written.” Other pieces have been covered by country artists. He has also composed film scores.

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            You’re right – I googled some of his music, and realized I have heard more of Jimmy Webb than I thought I had! It’s strange how you don’t think of the songwriters much unless they have performed the pieces themselves.

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            @pickleddragon,

            Jimmy Webb has been recording and performing his own music in concert for many years. About 10-15 years ago, I had the great pleasure of hearing him sing his own lyrics while accompanying himself on solo piano, and he was great. He has such a way with words, and a decent singing voice. Hearing the songwriter perform his own songs was exquisite, because of the way he caressed the lyrics. Like Jackson Browne, Jimmy Webb started his songwriting career in his teens.

            “Pianoman” Billy Joel is well known for his compositions. Ditto for Carole King and Jerry Goffin, who I believe started out working in the Brill Building. Any number of other songwriters started out there writing jingles for commercials, and a few of them successfully made the transition to pop music.

            I’m so glad you got to hear more of his music. It should be used in Kdrama soundtracks. Enjoy your explorations. 😉

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            Thank you for the recommendations, @pakalanapikake I always learn so much from my conversations with you 🙂 I will now wander off to explore…

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Lt. Susan Ahn Cuddy, USN (1915-2015)

Korean Independence Fighter’s Daughter Named America’s Hero
by Yu Yong-weon
http://english.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2020/07/10/2020071001911.html

(MORE)

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RIP, Maestro

Ennio Morricone: Oscar-winning Italian film composer dies aged 91
https://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-53305397
Main Title, TG,TB&TU
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h1PfrmCGFnk

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    I love his music so much ❤️❤️❤️

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      @bbstl,
      Maestro’s music is epic indeed. I cannot imagine the spaghetti Western genre without it. and I recall when Hugo Montenegro’s version of this was a big hit on AM radio when I was a kid. 😉

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        I remember that too, that whistling in the wind and the wah-wah-wah 😁

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RIP, Charlie Daniels

Charlie Daniels Band: Full Concert,10/20/79, Capitol Theatre, Passaic, NJ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YG2Tn4YPbZ0

I interviewed him for the campus paper when he (MORE)

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IT’S OKAY TO NOT BE OKAY, Ep. 5

Tom Lehrer: “Clementine” (live concert, 1959)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a5u4n64g2G0

Variations in the styles of Cole Porter, Mozart, (MORE)

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    With variations in the styles of Cole Porter, Mozart, Thelonious Monk, and Gilbert & Sullivan.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oh_My_Darling%2C_Clementine#Tom_Lehrer_version

    For those unfamiliar with the wit and satire of mathematics professor and troubador Tom Lehrer, you haven’t lived until you’ve heard the following pieces:

    Tom Lehrer: “The Masochism Tango”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TytGOeiW0aE
    Why to I get the feeling this could be Ko Moon-young’s theme song?!

    Tom Lehrer: “Poisoning Pigeons In The Park” (live, 1998)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hf-eIgFJg4w
    Shhhh! Don’t give Ko Moon-young any ideas!

    Tom Lehrer: “The Element Song”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U2cfju6GTNs
    Sung to the tune of “I Am the Very Model of a Modern Major-General” from the light opera The Pirates Of Penzance by Gilbert & Sullivan.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Lehrer

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    I have no idea why, but “My Darling Clementine”, along with “Do-Re-Mi” from The Sound Of Music, is actually one of the first songs I *ever* learnt from my mother! I always thought it was such a strange choice of song to introduce a child to in faraway India! (I was singing along when it came on the screen, even though it was meant to be creepy!)

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      @pickleddragon,
      Wow, “Clementine” is a pretty wild introduction to antique American popular music for a young child in India. On the other hand, many Mother Goose nursery rhymes from England also have gruesome roots, such as “Ring Around the Rosie,” which refers to the “posies” (patches of subcutaneous bleeding) of the Black Death, IIRC.

      Did you catch the nice instrumental version transposed into a minor key? I don’t recall which episode it was in, but it caught my ear. I think it may have been played on piano.

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        @pakalanapikake long time!

        You might be interested in this classic Hindi film song from a classic Bollywood movie which lifted its chorus line from ‘Clementine’: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HlAOZrst6fQ

        The song also has excellent lyrics (an insightful, dark commentary on urban life), which someone has generously provided a rough translation of about 15 comments in on the YT page.

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IT’S OKAY TO NOT BE OKAY, Ep. 5

Ed Vollmer & Haley Muth: “Oh My Darling, Clementine”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fn7duj6GNRg

Nice down-home rendition from Chenango County, central (MORE)

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    Nice down-home rendition from Chenango County, central New York State [due east of the Finger Lakes viniculture region]. LOL at the mention of artificial respiration!

    As Mr. Vollmer points out, the lyrics are morbid — every bit as morbid as fairy tales by the Brothers Grimm (how apropos!) and Hans Christian Andersen (anyone for macabre, possessed red shoes?!), and certain Mother Goose nursery rhymes.

    Lyrics
    https://www.songfacts.com/lyrics/traditional/oh-my-darling-clementine

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IT’S OKAY TO NOT BE OKAY, Ep. 5

The Weavers: “Clementine” (1952)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4vvsjU9thDE
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Weavers

As for “Oh My Darling Clementine,” (MORE)

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    As for “Oh My Darling Clementine,” it is set in the days of the California Gold Rush of 1849.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_Gold_Rush

    I suspect that it was unusual for women to have size 9 tootsies back then, which is why Clementine wore sandals made out of recycled wooden boxes in which dried salt herring had been packaged. I recall seeing one (or was it from salt cod?!) at my grandparents’ home in Boston when I was a kid. It was probably on Grandpa’s workbench in the basement. The box had a sliding lid — which was why Clementine’s footwear was “without topses.”

    What a great rendition of the song by The Weavers. Since it was issued as a 78RPM disc, it doesn’t have as many verses as some of the more recent video versions.

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    Dang!

    Forgot to include the entry for the song itself:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oh_My_Darling%2C_Clementine

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IT’S OKAY TO NOT BE OKAY, Ep. 5

Mitch Miller: “My Darling Clementine”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Y28SkgtI8I
The classic version I grew up with. Music producer was born 109 years ago today. MORE

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    I don’t even remember where I heard “Clementine” at/from but it stuck with me.
    I think it was probably at a girls camp lol.

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    Mitch Miller, Maestro of the Singalong, Dies at 99
    By Richard Severo, 08/02/2010
    https://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/03/arts/music/03miller.html

    Before karaoke and noraebang, there was SING ALONG WITH MITCH on the TV. Along with THE LAWRENCE WELK SHOW, it was a popular family program that featured old American popular music, including the old standards of Baby Boomers’ grandparents’ youth (roughly the 1890s through the Roaring Twenties).

    Here’s a taste:

    Sing Along With Mitch (1 of 4)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9dY9gtYeHhk

    Happy Birthday, Mitch!

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Mitch Miller, Born on the 4th of July

Remembering Singing Along With Mitch Miller
https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=128957153

Before karaoke & noraebang, we sang along with Mitch

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    You know, it felt like a 4th of July episode with all this American references.

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IT’S OKAY TO NOT BE OKAY, Ep. 4

The Hollies: “He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother” (1969)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ifyUPYXwdIc
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/He_Ain%27t_Heavy,_He%27s_My_Brother

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    Elton John on piano.

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    Come watch with me :).

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      @kiara,
      I’m watching. Just haven’t been able to keep up with the comments. Me likey — aside from the FL character’s stalkerish possessiveness, which creeps me out to the max. (However, Seo Yea-ji is doing a dandy job portraying the writer of truly grim fairy tales.) As I expected, Oh Jung-se is knocking it out of the park with his portrayal of Sang-tae. Dang, what a terrific actor. I also can’t get over Kim Joo-hun as Ko Moon-young’s publisher / adult supervision. What a switcheroo from his appearance and vibe in RDTK2. It’s a blast to see Kim Soo-hyun again, which takes a little of the sting out of Woo Do-hwan’s enlistment this coming week.

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        Thank you for the music <3.
        I missed them often but somehow you always picked them out.

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IT’S OKAY TO NOT BE OKAY, Ep. 4

David Wilcox: “Please Don’t Call” (Big Horizon, 1994)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vW-XLGeJ2c4

Danger, Will Robinson Kang-tae!

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IT’S OKAY TO NOT BE OKAY, Ep. 4

Bon Jovi: “You Give Love a Bad Name” (Slippery When Wet LP, 1986) MV
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KrZHPOeOxQQ

“Saranghae” my foot.

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IT’S OKAY TO NOT BE OKAY, Ep. 4

Soft Cell: “Tainted Love” (Non-Stop Erotic Cabaret LP, 1981) MV
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CCTBuOheUpE

Another “Saranghae” flashback.

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IT’S OKAY TO NOT BE OKAY, Ep. 4

Tuff Darts: “Your Love is Like Nuclear Waste” (Tuff Darts! LP, 1978)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dro6Ysjd5RQ
Moon-young’s “Saranghae” triggered a NY punk flashback

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DEAR MY ROOM / EUN JOO’S ROOM, OST Part 6

Soya 소야: “Sometimes”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8cdWf4Q9rz4
https://wiki.d-addicts.com/Eun_Joo%27s_Room_OST

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