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Why Her?: Episodes 15-16 (Final)

The most anticipated finale of the year has finally arrived, and while most of us have been waiting to be put out of our misery, our leading lady’s angst has only grown exponentially each week. Will she eventually find peace and happiness with her young paramour, or will she set fire to TK Law Firm and go out in a blaze of vengeful glory?

 
EPISODES 15-16 WEECAP

After last week’s unnecessarily gruesome and tragic final moments, I found myself simultaneously eager to rip off this K-drama Band-Aid and fearful of what I might find underneath the metaphorical bandage. How would the story handle Soo-jae’s grief? Would it be glossed over, or would the writers give it the proper attention it deserved?

Well, I’d say it was more of the latter — assuming we’re measuring solely based on screen time. I sat through approximately thirty minutes of achingly slow — but well acted — scenes depicting Soo-jae’s emotions as she grappled with the tragedy of her daughter’s death. By the time she attends Jae-yi’s funeral, she’s practically a zombie, and she barely flinches when Joo-wan publicly screams at her and blames her for their daughter’s death.

I mean, yeah, the whole Truck of Doom incident could have been avoided if Soo-jae had been holding Jae-yi’s hand, but like all tragic accidents, there’s a lot of should’ve-could’ve-would’ves to be tossed around. As they say, hindsight — and makjang writers — are a b*tch.

Sung-beom and In-soo attend the funeral with their sons, and perhaps one of my favorite scenes of the finale week is when they all sit down with Tae-kook. Dang-oh and Shi-hyuk begin griping about their current scandals, and Tae-kook splashes them with soju, reminding them that they are at his granddaughter’s funeral. I really hate those sniveling twerps, and it was satisfying to see them cower and be put in their place, even if it is unlikely that they felt true remorse. Either way, Tae-kook has a intimidating “you disgust me” face.

While Soo-jae is out of commission, the Group 8 students plow ahead with their investigation and try to find additional evidence to identify Na-jung’s killer. A key piece of evidence that they’ve yet to locate is Na-jung’s vest, which Eun-seo was wearing when she was admitted to the hospital after being hit by the car. If they find the vest, they can tie the two incidents together and establish a motive for Na-jung’s murder. Luckily, Joon-hee is a pack rat and has held onto it for ten years.

Soo-jae’s pain and sorrow have consumed her, and she disappears without telling anyone where she’s headed. The longer she’s missing, the more Chan worries for her wellbeing. His instincts prove correct because Soo-jae has traveled to the beach where she and Chan once had their spontaneous date together, and she plans to end her life.

Even though she had a massive head start, Chan is able to find her and pull her from the ocean. She puts up a fight, but Chan coaxes her out of her pit of despair with a rousing speech about how she should take responsibility for her wrongdoings if she’s so ashamed of them. And, while she’s at it, she should bring down the people who trampled on her and Chan. She’s strong and cool, and she can do anything if she sets her mind to it.

Apparently, Chan’s words were exactly what Soo-jae needed to hear. When we see her next, she has her game face on as she meets with her rag-tag team of student investigators on the eve of her disciplinary trial, which is to be televised (at her request) the same day as Jin-ki’s confirmation hearing as the new Minister of Justice.

Jin-ki and Se-pil plan to use Jin-ki’s hearing to publicize the cover-up of Eun-seo’s rape and (hopefully) present DNA evidence that proves she was in Sung-beom’s house the night of the incident. Unfortunately, before the confirmation hearing, Il-goo identifies Eun-seo and discovers her relationship to Jin-ki and Se-pil.

As a result, Tae-kook has time to come up with a counter attack, and so he exposes Jin-ki’s bribery scandal, proactively discrediting all of Jin-ki’s accusations. Sung-beom’s house, which Se-pil purchased under his American name, is also burned to the ground, and the blood found on Eun-seo’s earring was too old to analyze for DNA.

Back at Soo-jae’s disciplinary hearing, things seem to be going just as poorly. Not only has Tae-kook filled many of the spots on the committee with his own people, but the trial starts with the committee presenting some fairly incriminating evidence that proves Soo-jae has defended her clients using slightly amoral and illegal means. Case in point: the illegally obtained DNA test she used to prove that the plaintiffs suing Hansu Biomedical were frauds — never mind the fact that they were abusing their adoptive son and Soo-jae has been sponsoring the boy ever since.

Soo-jae and her lawyer Mi-rim request an adjournment, and to all eyes watching the trial, it appears to be a last ditch effort to buy time. But we know better. When the trial resumes the next day, Tae-kook watches from the comfort of his office, not suspecting that Soo-jae and Mi-rim will finally go on the offensive and destroy his ass.

They wait for Joon-myung, the chairman of the committee, to mention So-young’s death, and that’s when they unveil their own evidence, starting with a very telling photo of Tae-kook with his arm around So-young. The photograph isn’t enough to prove Tae-kook murdered So-young, but with each new counter argument that the committee — and Joon-wan, who’s allowed to yell things from the audience for some reason — proposes, Soo-jae unveils a new piece of evidence more damning than the last.

It all builds until Soo-jae finally plays a literal video of Tae-kook pushing So-young off the roof… Uhm, why didn’t they just lead with that? Ah, right, gotta make it dramatic.

The video, along with a crap ton of additional audio and video files, were acquired from Il-goo. After his son’s recent death, he was no longer beholden to Tae-kook’s financial support, and he decided to repent and lead a more honorable life. Thank goodness for Il-goo’s change of heart because, even though they matched Tae-kook’s fingerprint to the unidentified one found on the murder weapon, it was Il-goo’s testimony that cinched the case — especially in regards to what happened ten years ago.

For ten years, Il-goo held onto a handkerchief covered in Na-jung’s blood. It’s also stamped with an image of Tae-kook’s ring — which he conveniently still wears to this day. But wait! There’s more!

The night Na-jung was murdered, Il-goo’s gut told him not to trust the shady, murderous lawyer who was bound to make him a fall guy at the first sign of trouble. And so, Il-goo wore a hidden camera when he showed up to help Tae-kook dispose of Na-jung’s body, and footage from that night is played for everyone to see. I think it’s safe to say that Tae-kook will not be able to weasel his way out of trouble this time.

The most surprising part of this reveal is Joon-wan’s response. Apparently, Joon-wan has spent the last ten years thinking he and his buddies were the ones who killed Na-jung, and he’s been kissing his father’s butt ever since as a sort of penance for screwing up so horribly. Because, you know, murder is just a little oopsie, but making his father clean up his mess is the real crime. Ugh, props to this drama for creating some truly despicable villains; it’s one of the few things it did well.

Soo-jae’s trial eventually comes to a close because — to put it simply — it was rigged from the start. Since the proceedings exposed the corrupt dealings of many of the committee members, the committee lost the right to punish Soo-jae.

And what of our main villain? Well, after watching his reputation and empire crumble via live television, Tae-kook swallowed a bottle of pills and chased it with french fries and soju. In his final moments, he calls Soo-jae to ponder how things would have turned out if he’d accepted her as his daughter-in-law, and his last words are to tell Soo-jae that she shouldn’t feel confident that she’s won. Who am I to question a dying man’s unfounded and delusional sense of grandeur, but, yeah — he’s wrong. He won a lot of battles, but he definitely lost the war.

Our other bad guys don’t get any jail time for their crimes, and instead they face a trial by public opinion. It’s a rather frustrating outcome because Jin-ki, on the other hand, does go to prison for his one criminal act.

Admittedly, Jin-ki did face the judge and ask him to issue a severe punishment in order to make an example of him. As a lawyer, Jin-ki believed he should be held to a higher standard, and he wanted his punishment to serve as a reminder to other legal professionals that they should abide by the laws they’re sworn to uphold.

Six months pass — oh, yay, a last minute time skip — and Soo-jae is noticeably happier. Se-pil offers to invest in her law firm and have her on retainer for his company — because Hansu Biomedical is still hounding him after he canceled the buyout — but she rejects his offer. She’s found peace running her own small firm where she has the freedom and autonomy to live for herself and in the moment.

She’s also still teaching, and our drama comes full circle as Soo-jae arrives late to her first class of the semester. Once again she writes “I will never send my client to jail” on the board and faces her students. All the members of Group 8 are seated in the front row, and we learn that Gang-ja was the one with the highest grades last semester. Of course, instead of an internship with TK Law Firm, she will be interning at Soo-jae’s smaller firm — not that she’s upset about it.

Class ends and Soo-jae finds herself without an umbrella in the middle of a downpour, but luckily she’s kept Chan around during the last six months. He shows up with an umbrella — a callback to an earlier episode — but instead of handing it off to her, he puts his arm around her and they walk ~together~ through the rain.

I’m actually pleased that the romance plot ended on a subtle, happy note. Anything more would have just emphasized how glaringly mismatched Soo-jae and Chan were as a couple, and anything less would have made me angry that they included the romance in the first place. I know a lot of people have criticized Hwang In-yub’s acting and placed the lack of chemistry entirely on him, but Seo Hyun-jin didn’t sell the romance either, which leads me to believe the fault lies with the writing.

There were a lot of elements working against these characters and their romantic relationship: the student-teacher power imbalance, age and lifestyle differences, Chan’s blind hero worship, and Soo-jae’s disproportionate maturity and jadedness. Perhaps the worst offense of all, though, was how intimacy was manufactured through the repetitive formula of having Chan comfort Soo-jae whenever an external conflict — and there were a lot of them — made Soo-jae vulnerable and emotional. Aside from (maybe) their date on the beach, I legitimately struggle to think of any scenes where Chan was not acting as either her student or her human handkerchief.

Honestly, this drama dropped the ball on a lot of things — not just the arguably unnecessary romance. The most obvious is Soo-jae’s stint as a law professor, which was inexplicably shoehorned into the plot, but I didn’t predict that Yoon-sang’s character would end up being so disappointing. His relationship with his father and brother was only addressed superficially, and the epic betrayal that I thought we were building up to turned out to be a massive flop. What was the point of having him break into his father’s man-cave if Il-goo was going to swoop in with better, more incriminating evidence?

And speaking of Il-goo, we never revisited the fact that he supposedly hit Chan with a Truck of Doom. I have so many questions about that one flashback scene, but the drama never references it again. It’s like it never happened, which is not only an extremely weird oversight but a missed opportunity. It would have been a great way for the writers to explain that Chan had reconstructive surgery, which resulted in a dramatically altered appearance — a very absurd detail that has bugged me from the very beginning of this story.

Overall, I’m unabashedly disappointed with the decline of Why Her? over the course of its run, but I do want to acknowledge Seo Hyun-jin and Heo Jun-ho’s superb acting. The two of them — and their well rounded characters — carried this drama, and it’s a pity that the script did not match their star power. Given the surprisingly consistent ratings for Why Her?, I can only hope that the drama gods took notice, and maybe one day they will bless us with a better drama starring this duo.

 
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Seo Hyun Jin hard carried this drama. The plot ended up being meehh.

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It’s nice that after murdering not one but TWO young women on-camera, the cops felt absolutely no urgency around arresting the law firm CEO. Some people might think it necessary to get a man that rich and connected into custody ASAP, what with the murders broadcast on live TV, but this is why I am not a prosecutor or a detective I guess.

And hey how about Jae Yi’s dad and the woman he kidnapped and raped, and the other woman he kidnapped and tortured? He’s just… bopping around Korea, working out his daddy issues?

This show was a hot mess. And I genuinely feel bad for Yoon Sang, whose storyline is the absolute worst: dad disowns him and suicides, brother is a rapist, adorable niece is dead, tutor crush isn’t interested, the guy he actually wanted to befriend he alienated, loses his law school friends, steals a bunch of evidence that ends up being redundant, family firm collapses. Dude, just change your name and move to Sweden. If anyone deserves a clean break and new karma, might be you.

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Bae In Hyuk definitely deserves a clean kdrama break, that's for sure.

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I'm sorry but he's currently slated for another SBS (yikes) drama called Cheer Up that's airing in a few months in a currently dead Mon-Tue timeslot (double yikes): https://mydramalist.com/715821-cheer-up. At least this time round he's playing the 1st male lead even if he's not the main main lead?

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Aiyoo I know. *Sigh*
Hey if I had to wait just how many years for a KDY lead? I'm sure I can manage waiting for a rookie who only debuted in 2019 to get better roles.

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You forgot dad is a murderer of Yoon-sang's unborn half-sibling. I cheered when Joo-wan called Yoon-sang out on his inappropriate crush on Soo-jae. She was his brother's fiancée and niece's mother (I know he didn't know the latter). It's like crushing on his sister-in-law. Gross.

Yoon-sang can change his name to Gong Chan, while Chan can go back to living as Kim Dong-gu.

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Harsh! His feelings may be inappropriate, but gross is to far. He's not crushing on a family member that's related by blood.

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I know what/who I CAN give a hats off to though: @daebakgrits; this recap was a thoroughly entertaining read.

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Agreed! One of my favorite lines: “As they say, hindsight — and makjang writers — are a b*tch.”

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*snickers* of of my favourites as well.
Also love the commentary on the magical video mcfuffins and the human handkerchief.

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Hahaha! Thank you, @sicarius! It was definitely a bit of a struggle to get through at times, so I'm glad you stuck along for the ride with me. :-)

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As long as you don't mind that it was only through recaps... (I dropped thid at ep 2...) 😅😅😅
You did well. Probably better than I could've. Go have that glass of soju. Haha

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Wow, this drama was terrible. What a waste of Seo Hyun-jin's talent. While Hwang In-youp was miscast, absolutely no twentysomething actor could've made this character interesting or sold this romance. Chan was the equivalent of a wet blanket, and their romance was pathetic.

Chairman Choi being the Big Bad behind every death was overkill: Park So-young, Na-jung, himself. Why didn't he wipe his fingerprints off of the knife? What a rookie mistake. And why did he willingly give Mi-rim his fingerprints on the pen? Did he forget that he killed someone?

Can Secretary Ha have any more convenient evidence? Two murder videos and a handkerchief that he just conveniently held onto until his son died. I felt sorry for Chan having to see his stepsister's dead body in a video. Thank goodness his stepmother is blind. When Secretary Ha apologized to Dong-gu during the hearing, I thought he would apologize for his attempted Truck of Doom.

I cackled when Joo-wan confessed on live TV, "No, we killed Jeon Na-jung!" What an idiot.

Choi Young-joon was worth the watch, but this show would've been better if Soo-jae had worked with Se-pil. Even better if she had a romance with him.

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Cheers to all beanies who completed this gruesome journey! I hardly drop dramas after 8 episodes because I have a stupid principle of seeing things through finish line, but from this drama I learnt that we should have mercy on ourselves and get out while we still can on the first signs of a drama spiralling downward because it just isn't worth our time or mental health.

@daebakgrits Thanks for sticking with us through brilliant recaps that summed up all our emotions. The writer never paid any attention to detail of other characters, apart from the hero and villian because she conveniently forget about the mystery case Gang Ja wanted Soo Jae's help when she signed the non-disclosure agreement 🙄🙄 It is absymal that this drama got 10% ratings when other well written dramas struggled to even rise above 2% which only highlights that as long as you have corruption, government official and shock factors you can get away with absurd writing.

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Learning the Art of Dropping is life saving I tell ya.

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I'm sure the writer dropped Gang-ja's storyline, but it would've been nice if the case she wanted Soo-jae's help on was Kim Dong-gu's case, since she was a rookie cop at the time.

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It would have been a great way for the writers to explain that Chan had reconstructive surgery, which resulted in a dramatically altered appearance — a very absurd detail that has bugged me from the very beginning of this story.

To this point, do you all ever have a problem with Nam Da-reum?

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You mean how Nam Da Reum apparently grew up to become absolutely every k-drama lead? His features are much softer than the kid in WH, without distinctive angles, so I think he blurred into adult actors more easily. This actor though - he is very distinctive-looking, and so is HIY. Hard to match.

I usually can roll with whatever child/adult transition they do, but in this case I think they cast the actor just before a massive growth spurt that totally erased any connection between his face and Hwang In Yeop’s. I can sort of see it in his Sky Castle photos, but now? His current face is an adult face, no baby fat. It’s just not possible for skull and jaw shape to change that much from 17 to 27 without major cosmetic surgery or a well-placed truck.

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I don't really want to get in on this debate too much but I do just want to say that Nam Da Reum has this *uncanny* ability to act almost exactly like his older counterparts, which I believe is why he's so convincing as a the younger version of whoever.
There are child actors for XYZ (Young), and then there's Nam Da Reum, who just morphs into them, sometimes even out acting them as themselves. Sir. How. It's so good it's freaky sometimes lol.

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I get what you feel, but in this drama the ML was already 18 when he got arrested for false murder (you can see his age mentioned when Soo Jae discovers Chan's not-so-secretive white board in the rooftop) so, to say that his face structure changed because of a growth spurt is felt far fetching. Also, there was a flashback scene in some episode where Seo Hyun Jin acted as her younger self in school uniform watching her dad drink in the rooftop of her building. HIY is very young for his age, so people have trouble in understanding why he did not play his younger version, but we all know it was a plot device.

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I usually don't take issue with dramas casting different actors to play younger versions of characters, but this particular case bugged me for two reasons. One, the younger Chan was in his late teens and past puberty, so it's farfetched to think his face had changed so much that he was unrecognizable -- not only to us -- but to every other character who knew him ten years ago. Second, Hwang In-yub is a very youthful looking 31-year-old, and it seems a bit silly to not have him play his younger self when he was convincing as a high school student in True Beauty.

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It doesn't bother me when child actors don't look like their adult counterparts since dramas just rotate out the same child actors. The point of casting a teen actor for this role was so Soo-jae and the villains don't recognize Chan, so it was perfectly acceptable for Hwang In-youp to not play his younger self. No matter how youthful Hwang In-youp may look, he does not look one year older than the 2007-born actress playing Na-jung.

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@daebakgrits 🏆❤️👏 thank you for summarising what we were all thinking but could not express due to high levels of disbelief that we were STILL watching even after we had accepted things would continue to get worse and were proved right on a weekly basis.

There were so many ‘how does that even make sense’ moments that it was ridiculous in these last two episodes. The only things that brought me joy was calling that one more shock and awe scene would be played out, who the two people were who would provide the evidence and that she would set up a small firm to ‘help the people’.

So happy that is over and I agree with the @emsel that it’s disappointing that much better dramas received lower ratings than this show. I also think it’s a shame that it’s likely the great acting from the two main senior actors will go without recognition in the awards arena as the drama is unlikely to have been watched by those who give out awards.

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Why Her? is to Seo Hyun-Jin and Heo Jun-ho what Doctor Lawyer is to Shin Sung-rok - we hoping they get recognition for thier A-game in a disappointing script, and show.

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Thank God, it's finally done, the series is over.
By now I had almost hoped that a meteor would crash into the TK Law Firm building and wipe out everyone, really everyone. This plot twist wouldn't have been too far-fetched, given all the twists and turns the writers have given us before.

In the last episode it was once again confirmed that Choi Joo-wan is not the smartest. How can he blurt out to everyone that he and his two friends killed the girl? To protect the unscrupulous father?

I still wonder why the writers had to let Soo-jae's daughter die. And why was Soo-jae's motherhood revealed so late? It seems to me that they suddenly realised that they had a loose end that needed to be tied up somehow. But since the series was almost over, the daughter had to die quickly so that the issue was settled.

The Soo-jae from the first two episodes was the reason why I kept watching the series. She was a strong character, yet neither white nor black. But the longer the series ran, the less I could recognise this character. Especially when Soo-jae was with Gong Chang, there was not much left of the strong woman. What a disappointment.

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A very satisfying ending for Oh Soojae. But all round, a very unsatisfactory ending. We could have had this without the unnecessary ToD. Why exactly did it have to happen?
Tae-kook might have lost the war in life, but he won in death. He never faced the consequences explicitly as I'd want him to. Same thing goes for the rest of the evil guild. The court of public opinion🙄? For real 😏? What the hell is that? Baek Jinki decides to proscribe jail time for himself. So what stopped the trio from getting both jail time, and the judgment of the court of public opinion 🙄. If you wanted to hide behind realistic eventuality, then I guess the judges should have waived Jinki and just let him pay🙄 by losing his candidacy and seat as Justice Minister. But no. He serves jail time. Like WTH 😒. Just see what Why Her? did to the good guys. Triple lazy writing. The ending for the trio father & son baddies is why I wanted thier downfall to happen across at least two weeks, then the final blow. But no, they get just one huge blow that takes them all down. Lazy writing. Very lazy writing.

I began Why Her? for Seo Hyun-Jin and Heo Jun-ho, and I knew I wouldn't be disappointed with their acting as I could count on them. And from start to finish, I wasn't. This two will be a powerhouse it they are paired on the same side.

The only thing Why Her? succeeded in doing is exposing the trio for what they are...not once did it succeed at making them pay for thier accumulated bulkload of crime.
I've not wasted my time watching this because I was really entertained by SHJ and HJH, but I'm pissed at the show for giving this abysmal finale that they called an ending.

For those who watched King of Pigs, there's no much difference between Why Her?'s and King of Pigs. Sacrificed plot buildup for supposed realism in favor of characters who never deserved it.

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King of Pigs is not good?

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It's very good.
I'm making reference to the judgment/end given to the bad guys wasn't. It was like a slap on the wrist, just as how ending for the trio baddies and their children is - a slap on the wrist.

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I'm okay with mediocre endings as long as the journey is good. Thanks for the heads up because I was about to start it this week.

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The ending of King of Pigs isn't mediocre. It was fitting for each of the characters. Very fitting. The little itch was the show giving the evil antihero a dignifying ending, and the good antihero not getting even the simplest honorary mention, hence the slap on the wrist comment I made earlier.

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@jerrykuvira
if the good antihero doesn't even get a mention, is the ending really fitting for each of the characters? I've no idea myself, I'm just curious as to your summary haha.

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In her next life can Soo-jae please write the “I will never send my client to jail” at the beginning of the hour instead of the end, and then spend the remainder of the first session explaining just how to accomplish that.

It was pretty irresponsible teaching, just for the sake of being dramatic, and it was one of the early signs the show had more drama than common sense.

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I agree her disrespect to the students was unnecessary and unacceptable as they had to do all the work for their assignments with no guidance what was she being paid to do mark assignments?

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Bean achieved. Process deleted from memory. Next.

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First off, before anything, I would like to give my endless praise to @daebakgrits. These recaps have been biting, witty, and hilarious - all while being insightful and beautifully critical of all this show’s never-ending flaws. Why Her? the drama was painful, but these write-ups were a gift to the community. I think I speak for many when I say I look forward to whatever you have in store for us in the future. Thank you for being so articulate about what we were collectively feeling.

As for the drama, it deserves no words except for this: Good fucking riddance.

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Yes agreed @daebakgrits you really did a superb job with the weekly weecaps tone as well as content.

There must a special award for the Beanie who ends up on hate watching duty and still has to get the balance right so the write up is interesting enough to console the beanies watching in pain, and even harder, to not offend those who are not only watching willingly but also enjoying. I think there are multiple potential names for the award but ‘I don’t get paid enough to be doing this…’ would be my suggestion.

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get the balance right so the write up is interesting enough to console the beanies watching in pain, and even harder, to not offend those who are not only watching willingly but also enjoying

@reply1988 this is actually a legitimate struggle I face. If someone's enjoying a drama, I don't want to invalidate their opinion or dampen their fun with my criticisms, but when a drama has me feeling all sorts of frustrated, it's hard not to address the giant elephant in the room. Luckily, this time it seems like we were all hate watching Why Her? together. Haha.

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There were a few people who thought it was ok so weren’t suffering the way we were so you pitched it right.

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I thought you struck just the right balance. While I obviously disliked the show, I can’t imagine being offended by anything you wrote even if I liked it. There’s nothing wrong with expressing personal frustrations or honest constructive criticism.

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Thank you, for sticking around with me! I think we all need a round of soju after this one.

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I will have my water in the shot glasses to style it out (I don’t drink) but definitely up for the celebration 🎉

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Count me in. I need something strong to make me forget.

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japanese doramas LOVE age-inappropriate (and especially teacher/student) romances... makes me cringe. didn't watch this one because of that.

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Thank you for the recap @daebakgrits. I was pretty on board up until the ridiculous ending of episode 14 and then I just couldn’t face two more episodes! Can always come back if I’m desperate for a bean at year end I guess.

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Seo Hyun-Hin and Heo Jun-Ho were the 2 leads for me. They were the ones who made the plot progessing and they were the best actors.

Gong Chan's character didn't bring anything more to the story than his step-sister, Director Baek Jin-Ki's daughter or the bar hostess, they were all victims. The romance was useless in this story and the actors couldn't make work neither. Hwang In-Yeop was pretty disapointing in this role. Bae In-Hyuk, whose the role was the most useless in the story, at least didn't look bad.

I didn't really care about the end. The villains had to stop their manigances but it's all. Soo-Jae is happy, I guess it's the most important.

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Ughhhhh. Finally done with this freaking drama. They just HAD to show So Young's death one last time?! -_-

So bad. Waste of the cast. Unbelievable how the plot continued to go downhill. I finished for the bean and my completist mindset. I only had these two episodes left. I even wish the ratings had gone down. What a shame.

Now I have Doctor Lawyer to finish, but I'm way more behind on it. I feel like I should go get a general idea of the reviews and then decide to drop it or not. XP

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I have been trying not to reply to comments so that I don't open sore wounds 😩😅.

I really just want to give everyone who finished live-watching this drama without breaking their screen a huge virtual hug. If I was able to drop dramas I start watching, this would have been a perfect candidate.

This drama had so much potential and removing the love line/triangle imo would have solved 70-80% of those problems. Don't even get me started on Truck of dooming a child which was horrible, unnecessary and did nothing for the plot and the thousand other things which were wrong.

Thank you @daebakgrits, your weecaps made a huge difference :)

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Well done for completing the show 💪 I was giving out T-shirts on my fanwall so go grab one if you haven’t got yours already😊 It’s not an issue to jump in on recaps and comments after the event if it’s a fresh comment no one will see it. If however you like or do a reply to someone or tag someone then if they check the notification to see what comment you liked/mentioned them in that one person will come back. I only scrolled down and saw your message because Dramabeans often brings me into the wrong section of a recap when I click on the like notification so I have to try several times to get to the right place and once I realised where I was I wanted to see whether anyone had watched/commented later.

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😆I'll go and pick up my t-shirt. Thankssss

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Heh, I don't mind the notification/like~ I appreciate it, thanks. ^^

And I totally agree about removing the romance aspect!

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