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Law School: Episodes 14-15 Open Thread

We’re almost to the end, and the case that started it all is no longer a mystery, but that doesn’t mean it’s easy for our protagonists to prove it. Now it’s a matter of outsmarting the culprit, who isn’t above using all manner of corrupt and illegal means to literally get away with murder.

 
EPISODES 14-15 WEECAP

Now that everyone knows for certain it’s Assemblyman Go pulling all the strings, they put their all into bring him down once and for all, but for their every move, he has a dirty trick waiting to counter them. Nothing new is actually revealed, but at least everyone is on the same page now, I suppose. Law School has a unique talent for being boring and hard to follow at the same time. Last week was the show’s high point, but now that the focus is back on Seo Byung-ju’s murder and Assemblyman Go’s web of corruption, I find it barely keeps my interest.

We’re also sadly lacking in Sol A/Joon-hwi moments this week, and instead we get Yangcrates becoming weirdly chummy with skeezy Prosecutor Jin, who now suddenly discovers that Go was evil all along, the strange reappearance of Kang Dan as a Harvard Law scholar, and enough double-crossing and fake-outs that I honestly felt exhausted at the end of two hours.

That last one where Sol A revealed herself to have impersonated Dan was pretty great though—I enjoyed the fact that she was definitely channeling her favorite professor’s cool condescension in the role. It’s too bad it lacked some impact because of how many plot twists were stuffed into Episode 15 alone.

I’m being harsher than usual on this show, but I really felt the drop in quality after a truly decent wrap-up of Ye-seul’s case last week. It feels like we’re back at the beginning with the confused timeline, constant “Gotcha!” reveals that aren’t as surprising or as dramatic as the drama thinks they are, and this writer again mistaking complexity for profundity.

On top of that, the show has a very muddled view of the law—it seems to be arguing for everything at the same time, with no clear sense of ethics except that as long as it’s legal, anything goes. That’s fine if you can magically make the “good” guys win every case through a mix of clever arguments and coincidence, but it totally ignores the very real brokenness of the criminal justice system and reduces injustice to the result of a few bad actors. So all it takes for the rotten-to-his-core Prosecutor Jin to see the error of his ways is an elaborate murder board showing him that the guy he’s hitched his wagon to is A Very Bad Man. Even Vincenzo was more realistic than that.

And along the same theme, anything our protagonists do is fine simply because they’re doing it. For example, Eun-sook scratches the back of whichever bigwig is expedient in service of her purportedly high legal ideals—regardless of how evil that person might be, or who might be harmed by either the appearance or the reality of her joining them, even temporarily.

In a better show (say, Forest of Secrets) this would prompt an exploration of the well-meant seeds of corruption, a road to hell paved with so many good intentions. Alas, this is not that show, although it seems to be under the regrettable impression that it is.

The cast are still great and they’re doing their best, but now that everything is wrapping up, the seams are really showing. Sticking the landing is a tall order for any drama, but especially a legal mystery where all the threads need to come together in a way that’s satisfying but not obvious. We’ve still got one episode to go, but this was a messy penultimate outing. I’m hoping the finale will lean on what this show does best: the students’ struggles and friendships, Jong-hoon being stern but mentorly, a good last underdog victory for our study group, however unrealistic. And Joon-hwi finally confessing his obvious crush!

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I have no idea how you are able to analysis things so well but @laica you are so right! You are hard on the show but something is obviously not right.
I keep watching parts of it again and wondering how could it have been made better and why am not satisfied with where the story has taken me. And you explain it so well.

I think problem is ambition, the show extended itself too much and tried to do justice to every character, which is not possible for so many reasons.
But amen to your last statement. I do not want Joon Hwi to "just be grateful"... That sequence made me question if the writer just wanted to stay away from romance all together so they would end the series on Joon Hwi being confused about this feelings wherein he likes our girl but he thinks it is just gratitude!

Maybe in later years of the law school things become clearer for him when she starts dating another person and this romance genre will be written as fan fiction :D

Anyway, I enjoyed Kang Dan and bits of prof Yang so I don't regret watching this series but seriously they could have tweaked things a bit. I know episode 16 will not be satisfying but an audience has to take what they get else just speak about their unsatisfied experiences on dramabeans :)

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I don't think Joon-Hwi has only "gratitude" with Sol A. After all, he said that to Sol B, a roommate of A, and probably a rival of getting Joon-Hwi's love as well, so my thinking is, @noone, wait and see--because we know they met each other long before Sol A did something making Joon-Hwi feels "gratitude".

I honestly don't think @laica's assessment here is right, and I lay out my reasons down there (Comment #5). After all, I don't deny both Joon-hwi/Sol A relationship or Je-seul's case are writing well, they both are merely side stories. The drama must go back to where it starts to end it.

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I am looking forward to reading it :)

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To touch briefly on Joon-hwi's behaviour, unfortunately it makes sense with his character and it means we're not going to get a romance plotline because of it.

Joon-hwi is clearly cocoa for coco puffs over Sol A but his overriding personality trait is an almost-maternal desire to support and help his friends. We've seen it over and over again with almost every character and in this case, Sol B needs him to be motivated by his care and consideration for her rather than his romantic feelings for Sol A. Sol B is - and has been since the beginning - on the cusp of a huge emotional breakdown and Joon-hwi is the only one who can see that. If helping her through this means putting aside his feelings for Sol A for a minute then he's the kind of person who can do that. So this worked for me, even though my shipper heart is breaking.

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To be honest it works for me too within the current set up.

At no point within the study group does he stand up for Sol A (like openly and vocally). I feel as though he wants to keep his feelings to himself and enjoy them, so he just does his bit: smile because of her, answer queries that he knows she would ask, follow her and follow her lead. He doesn’t answer the boy with curly hair (sorry I can’t remember his name) when he asks what’s happening between you two or respond to Sol B comprehensively as Sol B isn’t his best buddy. Now when I think about it, he doesn’t have a close close buddy in the group (other than Sol A), no?
Sol A is the only person he ends up drinking with or sometimes speaking about personal stuff. Again maybe that is the shipper in me.

Oh I so wanted some follow up somewhere where there was a validation of the fact that he feels more than gratitude towards her. They built it up consistently and now I feel ghosted!
I have now officially watched hours of fmvs with them to just enjoy their interactions. Those moments are just so satisfying!

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However, many fmvs have such funny messages when he picks the pen and tells Yangcrates there is no high bun hair styled person in class. And many take that as him standing up for him and his kiss example was just so funny! That could be considered flirtatious but at that point in the law school life (despite the weird editing), I agree with Sol A description of him (she tells Byeol and Byeol tells him when he comes to drop Sol A).

Oh and though I found editing in the beginning very weird, I realised that they have literally used those to teach the subjects that they will practice in court during the court cases. Yup, it took sometime but now I see it and I like it :)

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I also think that Joon-hwi is just not the kind of person who needs to confess his feelings and have them be reciprocated. He's just happy for the moment to feel his feelings and do what needs to be done and (hopefully) come back to them later.

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Can we kidnap him?

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Maybe we could clone him? Then we can all have one?

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I agree with everything you said @laica. The show works best when it focuses on students and their struggles. It's biggest flaw is that there is clear distinction good guys and bad guys when the Law itself never makes that distinction. Justice through the law just remains as tagline, it never explores it.

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And it never really defines what justice is either. It touched on some interesting points about ignoring the ethics and morality of a powerful people to achieve something greater - the Lee Man-ho act and the Dating Violence act for example - but never leverages any of those points to ask deeper questions.

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Yes, exactly this.

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The truth of the jurae-dong accident is very very borderline. In every work environment, mentee-mentor or friendship mishaps is very tangible that calling the other out is hard to do, even though it goes against the ethics and moral we live by. Should I cover up an incident for my friend or person or mentor or mentee? The funny thing is its at the person coverings detriment at the end of the day, much worse when covering up for the likes of Assemblyman Ko.

I pray Joon-hwi Sol A doesn't end up in gratitude, and how can she be so dumb to his affection?

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Haha, @jerrykuvira, Sol A may be dumb, but I guess if I am Joon-hwi, I would forgive her: she has too many issues (her study, her family matter, her financial situation, all the cases, and her twin sister, to name a few) need to deal with, just give her a break!

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True, she's too occupied to notice

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Thank you for the weecap, @laica! Yes, the last episodes were confusing in all the fake-outs. Prof Kim with the suggestions to Assemblyman Go, Yangcrates shaking up Prosecutor Jin, Joon-hwi liking somebody but I don't think he did any follow-thru this time, and most of all, Seol A masquerading as Erica Shin. If Go had started an argument with her using the law, could she have won? She already admitted that she's not the brightest bulb in the group while Erica Shin is considered an expert from Harvard Law! Good thing for her there was no confrontation.

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Thank you for your effort to write this article, but sorry, @laica, I totally disagree with you.

The Kang Dan twist as well the impersonate of her by Sol A is the high point of this drama, I watched this (as well Ep. 14's ending, as Kang Dan's first real appearance) no less than 5 times each, also extra effort to screen-grab the scenes. Kang Dan’s story, in my opinion, is well executed, and wonderful to watch, and it is not too hard to predict that she will reappear in this show, because, after all, her relationship with Assemblyman Go, as well her entanglement with her own family is important part of this whole drama.

Ye-seul's story is well told, but after all, it is a side story, and it is part of the web Assemblyman Go is building. The show must go back to the original case, which is Prof. Seo Byung-ju’s murder and Assemblyman Go’s web of corruption. After all, Ye-seul winning the case is not the end of the story, Prof Seo's is, and beating Assemblyman Go must be the final goal.

Sol A/Joon-hwi’s interaction is fun to watch, but again, it is just another side story. If you want a sweet love story, you can go to watch My Roommate Is a Gumiho (Doom at Your Service may be a good choice, but I think it is more philosophical than a love story). Asking more about Sol A/Joon-hwi’s love story is like asking Cha-young and Vincenzo to kiss at the end of Episode 9 of Vincenzo, it is not only unsuitable, it is offensive.

I know K-dramas (and movies) have visited too many political scandals lately, beginning with Lee Byung-hun's award-winning (and well deserved) Inside Men of 2015. Assemblyman Go's, on the other hand, has some flare of current affairs, which I appreciate: his fake news network. I hope there is no Donald Trump/Rodrigo Duterte/Vladimir Putin/Xi Jinping supporter here (That silly attack I witnessed in the comment section of Doom at Your Service is not something I want to see here), but all these political scammer's powerful tool is controlling fake news (I heard in Russia there is a specific term to call this: Kompromat). If Ye-seul being sexually exploited by his then boyfriend (and after all, she seems to still have feelings for him, that's more hurtful) is a very harmful Infringement of her, then those terrible messages towards her are the second, just as harmful, infringement. (Seo Ji-ho: "They just killed my father a second time.") This is an issue we must address, and we should.

Based on the above argument, @laica, you have also neglected the reason why Prof. Yang Jong-hoon goes against his students, and sides with Prosecutor Jin Hyeong-woo to argue against the law of investigative secrecy. It is not, as you say, "a very muddled view of the law—it seems to be arguing for everything at the same time, with no clear sense of ethics except that as long as it’s legal, anything goes." In the last Open Thread, @jingbee said this...

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(Con't) ... In the last Open Thread, @jingbee said this well, “This show came in the wake of several vigilante justice dramas , as it serves a strong counterpoint to that theme.” It is probably not only another good chance Prof Yang lecturing his students (It's so cute he loves his teaching!). We need no devil to fight other devils. Professor Yang Jong-hoon seems like a “devil” to his students, but he follows every law, yet he won against a devil as powerful as Jun-woo/Assemblyman Go. His decision to side with Prosecutor Jin, because winning is not the reason to uphold the law, making the law perfect is, and making the law perfect protect more people, instead of like Vincenzo, beating the devil by siding with another devil like Vincenzo Cassano maybe way more fun to watch, Prof Yang’s way is way more realistic.

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Just a little note about Kompromat: It is, in fact, a Russian word borrowed, then short-formed from English "compromising material", which means information to damage your political opponents, no matter if it is true or not.

One of the earliest Kompromats is for Yuri Skuratov, then Russian Attorney General in 1999. He was investigating then President Boris Yeltsin's corruption scandal, but then, a video of a man looks like Skuratov having sex with 2 women showed up on TV news. Despite his refusal to admit he was that man, then Head of FSB (the successor of KGB) said he was. Skuratov finally had to resign his job, and the investigation had stopped.

First of all, 4 years later evidence came up that the man in the video was really not Skuratov, and secondly, half a year later President Yeltsin suddenly resigned stating health issues, and that Head of FSB became the new President of Russia.

The rest is history, the new president is Vladimir Putin.

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The law is the key theme and we've seen it tested and interrogated in various circumstances. It's not perfect, but it is all we have to protect us from the law of the jungle. Go seems cartoonish, but so slippery, many would say what's the point. He has the prosecution in his pocket and he has a stranglehold over the media. He can do what he likes with impunity. Only people like Professor Yang who are skilled enough in using the law can come anywhere near close to bringing him undone. It's fabulous to see him training his students, as the next generation. I loved that he made Ye-seul take responsibility for her own defence and that he gives Kang Sol B space to find her integrity. But more than anything, I really loved that he confronted his students about matters such as the right to defense for even people they would deem unworthy of it. It's all about the law, not about the romantic OTPs, a pleasant side issue.

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Agree with everything you said, @jorobertson, but I would like to point out one issue you've mentioned above: Assemblyman Go. It is true his cartoonish portrayal is something I don't quite like (that's why I hate American hero comics, and Christopher Nolan's Batman trilogy is the only Hero Movies I like so far). He seems pretty invincible in an unrealistic way. But on a second thought, I guess even some real person, who happen to have huge power as well controlling the media and spreading fake news, are pretty cartoonish as well (Think Donald Trump--sorry if you love him--according to several media report, he does have a media centre just outside Washington with loads of people helping him to sway public opinion on Facebook and Twitter, just like Assemblyman Go), so maybe, why do we neglect such character?

Maybe this is exactly the point we should care about him.

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Totally agree, and I had him in mind after I'd written the comment. Putin too. But all powerful people who commit crimes and consider themselves above the law ...

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I'm glad you're enjoying the show! I do think you misunderstood me, though—I don't think Ye-seul's case is the main point of the drama. I just feel it was much better executed than the main murder case at the center of the show. And I do see that the drama is attempting to tackle a lot of complex and important issues, as you say. But to me, the end result falls far short of the writer's ambition.

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Thanks for your reply, @laica!

I feel sorry if I do misunderstand you. However, I think in the week before the finale, I don't mind missing some Sol-A/Joon-Hwi reaction. I guess we both agree we love this pair (I may be even shipping them), but as I said, Prof. Seo Byung-ju’s murder and Assemblyman Go’s web of corruption is the centre, and I guess focus on the main story doesn't hurt (or should I look forward to their relationship flourish at the last minute of the show, just like Cha-young and Vincenzo did?). Certainly the storytelling should have been improved somewhat, but I am satisfied (maybe just me?)

I know a show is good or bad sometimes based on individual taste, and I understand we are on the opposite side of the opinion, so I am okay with that. Partly I believe this week is great (other then Kang Dan and Sol A's impersonation of her) is about the impact of fake news (which I have explained in great detail in my initial comment, so I won't repeat here), how the students being affected by it, and how Prof. Yang and his students beating it. Prof. Yang sides with Prosecutor Jin on investigative secrecy law is in fact part of that same argument (and judged by what he said to Seo Ji-ho, I guess he is challenging them to argue against him, part of his teaching method). South Korean society like to judge their public figures with some kind of moral standard, and keeping secret on investigation should have become an issue for suspects being judged or not (and being fairly judged or not) by the public opinion (Ki Do-seong, the suspect who “murdered” Lee Min-ho: “If public opinion is final, my case would have ended right now.”), which I think this week's episodes has laid out both sides' argument in an amazing way.

I am also looking forward to Prof. Kim’s action. Not only did she make a deal with Assemblyman Go on Min-ho’s son, James. She is obviously a double agent between Go’s and Yang’s camp. I think her character will be very interesting in the finale.

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I also like the fact that the story went back full circle to the main plot, the circumstances leading to the murder and the prequel to it, such as the reason for Kang Dan's disappearance. I would have wanted though to see some scenes where SolA defending LMH, not because LMH is forgivable but to show the other theme that was explored which is all about the right to a representation. Of course some SolHwi scenes would have been nice too but it is better kept as a side dish as I did not sign up for a college romance drama. This show is definitely not perfect and like the usual, the ending a bit rushed but I am looking forward to the final lessons that Yangcrates will impart. Prof Kim is a bit ambiguous too but I think her heart is still in the right place. She also thinks two steps ahead and uses her skill in drafting proposed bills to counter Assemblyman Go's schemes.

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Maybe they should air a 2-hour finale just to tie up all the loose end. It maybe too long for other drama, but I don't think it would be for this one.

(Although tvN always do that, but I rarely see JTBC do such thing though)

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I love your comment the moment I read Duterte's name. He is rumored to have a whole den of fake news/commenters who justify his decisions and statements (sorry if there are DDS here).

I love Law School so much though I admit that I did watch for SolHwi but I am someone who doesn't think much about the story unless it demands to be understood (Forest of Secrets 1 &2). I also agree with you that they needed to go back to the first case to come full circle.

The Kang Dan reveal was amazing! I still can't get over the fact that she refused Joonhwi's handshake and went to SolB instead.

I am looking forward to the last episode and there are still a lot of unanswered questions so I don't know how they'll wrap it up. Hoping for a Season 2 where they'll focus on school more and probably ships. (again this is my delulu self talking, ignore me)

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"He is rumored to have a whole den of fake news/commenters who justify his decisions and statements"
——See! Dictators are all the same ...

That "Kang Dan" hand shake scene is amazing, I am imagining Joon-hwi comes back and "questions" Sol A's attitude ...

For some good dramas, a season 2 may not be a good thing, unless they have a great script (Think about Hotel del Luna). I would rather to have a 2-hour finale explaining all things and tying up all knots ...

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Law School Super Short Funny Little Fan Fiction

JH: Why do you not shake hand with me?
Sol A: ...
JH: Why?
Sol A: Because, I ...
JH: What?
(Sol A kisses him)
(He kiss her back)

--The End--

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Need a prequel to your sequel -when/how did Sol A become aware of JH’s feelings for her? As if Episode 15, she’s still oblivious?

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You know what? I'll take this. I'm that desperate. HAHA

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@hebang & @purplesheesh, I would also like to ship Ye-seul and Bo-gi: Ye-seul deserve someone really loves her, and that would be fun to have a Beauty and the Beast pair, haha ...

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I love them both. And while we're at it, ship JiSolB too!

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Sol A and Joon Hwi are the heart and soul of this drama. It is sad they sidelined their relationship. The singular issue for me for the last few episodes is laying the ultimate blame at Assemblyman Go's feet. They seem to want to absolve everyone else of their own personal responsibility in the matters. Everyone had personal agency and deserved punishment for their actions. However, I did love Ye soul's storyline and I think they mostly did a good job there.

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No offense, but "Sol A and Joon Hwi are the heart and soul of this drama"?

I don't think so.

If Law School is about Sol A and Joon-Hwi, why the story start by the Prof. Seo Byung-ju's murder? Shouldn't it be started with Sol A and Joon Hwi meet in that bookstore?

(My detail reasoning be one story up from yours)

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You don't have to agree, lol. That is just how I feel. The fact that the story doesn't start with them is irrelevant. All the stories literally circle around the two of them. Even if they are tangential to the particular story being told, they are still involved, particularly Sol A.

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Yeah, I just think differently as you do. Welcome more bouncing of ideas, @kafiyah-bello!

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I think I understand what @kafiyah-bello is trying to say here and I am in general agreement that the duo are written to represent the emotional core of the show. For me this is not about the romance (although I'm onboard with it like everyone else) but a shared passion for justice or drive to ensure that justice is done. The word "soulmate" has been bandied about but it applies quite well in this context. She might not be academically where he is but she's smart, sassy and cares a great deal about the victims and underdogs. In her eyes, the law should be a weapon for justice. A means to a good cause. That's why she struggles greatly with Yangcrates and Prof Kim making deals left, right and centre with very unpleasant people. The impulse is not too dissimilar to that of Joon-hwi desperately wanting his uncle to turn himself in at the start.

The two of them represent an ongoing idealism in the narrative that flies in the face of all the perceived naked expediency that's going around them. They stand out even among the other members of the study group for their earnestness. That seems to me to be the role that they play in the larger narrative of the classroom dynamic.

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I may not agree with you, @lilium, 100%, but I do agree with you partially. My understand is: Sol A is our eye to this legal world, and she is the most relatable character among all of them, and she help us understand this small yet elite society. She may represent everyone of us, who think Law is like something from outer space, and try to understand--and because Law "has done her wrong, so she has to make the Law "apologize" to her. Joon-hwi may have been representing another part of us: we admire those who practice law, and think they are hero, who fight for justice, and then all of a sudden, he find that they are not as glamorous as we think, even dirty and dark ...

I love their interaction, feel what they are feeling about the law, and part of me may even want them to fall in love, but after all, they are our bridges toward this elite society. So I agree they have an important role to play in this story, and so I, as an audience, may feel proud of what they do, because they represent us as audience. But I won't feel sad if they sidelined their relationship, because it is just a bonus.

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I'm not someone who thinks that they sidelined SolHwi in Episodes 14 and 15 at all. If anything, the show was able to show through clever editing how much in concert those two were.

As a matter of fact I love what the show has done with their dynamic all throughout. They've been very smart about it. I like my crime shows to keep the main thing the main thing. Often I find that a badly-written loveline can derail the main story but that hasn't happened. It's been very subtle, very gradual... and it has been integrated well.

But I do want some kind of acknowledgement at the end that SolHwi is a thing because this relationship is something that the show itself has been building. I didn't start watching this for romance but several episodes in, I was invested.

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Yeah, @lilium, I guess the screenwriter will end Sol A/Joon Hwi nicely. After all, it is part of the story, although not the main focus.

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When I wrote heart and soul, it wasn't necessarily in a romantic way, but in a, they are the core of the drama. You mention emotional core, but I think they are the core in general. At the end of the day everything comes around to them even tangentially. The pedophile living near her, her being Ye Seul's closest friend, Joon Hwi's uncle dying, him being the the reason for the study group, etc etc. Those aren't just emotional or even a shared passion for justice as you mentioned. They are the matriarch and patriarch of their little friend group, but also their own people. All that to say, ha, is I agree with your assessment, but I found them to also be more than that. They are the defacto leads of this drama.

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I think your comments are fantastic and I've enjoyed reading each and every one of them. But characters can be the heart of a show even if their plotline isn't the main plotline. And execution matters too. Joon-hwi and Sol A are the heart of the show, whether they end up together or not. And in its shift from character moments to plot moments, the show has made the mistake most crime dramas make - over emphasising process in lieu of its previous character driven nature.

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I kept thinking the exact same thing as Assemblyman Go being the one to shoulder all the blame. I mean, I'm no fan of the guy, but I can't deny that that people who were/are in cahoots with him had a choice to walk away but didn't. It feels like the characters have forgotten that Jin, Lee Man Ho, and Professor Seo made the choice to be shady with Go.

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That part.

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I don't think we're necessarily meant to agree with Sol A's assessment of the situation as it involves Assemblyman Ko. It's more a reflection of her empathetic qualities at play and her desire to comfort those who have suffered directly or indirectly at his perfidious hands. I certainly don't see it as some kind of absolution of responsibility on the part of Lee Man-ho or Seo Byung-gu et al but an acknowledgement that Ko is a dangerous figure who needs to be taken down quick smart. It's a cry from the heart rather than an objective assessment of what's being going on. Of course if any of the participants in this web of deceit were still alive, they would all have to pay for their sins in some fashion. Everybody in this show pays for their mistakes and crimes up to now.

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I understand what you mena about Sol A, and I certainly agree that Assemblyman Go needs to be taken down ASAP, but I wish it didn't feel like he was the one who made the choice for the people he did his shady business with. But yeah, nearly everyone has more or less paid for his or her wrongdoings, so at least there's that.

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This is valid. I hadn't thought of it that way, but you are right.

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I enjoyed the episodes, but was a little disappointed to hear Joon Hwi say he feels indebted toward Sol A. I was like, wait, what? You've spent all this time looking at her like you think she's the most adorable thing you've ever seen and now you say that you feel grateful toward her? 😑

Can't wait for Assemblyman Go to get what's coming to him. I really hate the guy. Jin too. And for our students to go back to doing student things instead of worrying about lawsuits and trials and taking down corrupt people.

And is it too much to ask for us to get some sweet moments between Sol A and Joon Hwi in the final episode?

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*grateful, not indebted

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I was disappointed too, but then I gave Joon-hwi points for emotional intelligence - he obviously knows Sol B likes him, so maybe this was a kinder way to talk about Sol A than "I have a massive crush on her" (which tbh I'm pretty sure Sol B already knows, but that doesn't mean she wants to hear him say it)

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I actually hadn't thought about it that way. But you're right. It does seem like a pretty Joon Hwi thing to do, trying not to rub his crush on Sol A in Sol B's face.

Thanks for giving me a different perspective 👍🏾

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Yes to your last sentence!!!

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When I started watching this drama, I had no idea that I would love it this much. I even dropped it at Ep 4 because Lee Man Ho was creepy and despicable. However, since my Wed and Thurs nights were free, I decided to watch it again and fell in love with SolHwi after Ep6.

I am someone who doesn't take dramas seriously unless of course the plot demands my brain to work. This drama doesn't do that for me but I enjoy it. I look forward to midweek because of it and I am sad that it's ending. I really hope they give us a fun and memorable finale. I mean I'll take it even though it won't make sense.

Thanks for this, Anisa!

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At first I thought the drama was just alright and enjoyable enough for me to watch whenever the fancy struck, but then I found it growing on me until I started looking forward to new episodes on Wednesdays and Thursdays.

I'm pretty sad it's ending this week. It's been quite an enjoyable ride, and I'll have to go back to searching for something else to watch to occupy my time 😭

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There's certainly no denying on my part that there's a certain madness to all of this. I don't think the show pretends otherwise. But that's always been the case practically from Day 1 so I'm not exactly clear on what's different here. Admittedly I came to this late, and binge-watched 15 episodes in two days. It struck me not long afterwards that Yang Jong-hoon is a fascinating pedagogical figure. He seems to be the consummate teacher where every single event becomes a teaching opportunity. The entire world that he inhabits essentially is his classroom. I wonder quite a bit if he didn't allow himself to be arrested and then indicted just so his students can have hands-on experience with a murder trial. I certainly wouldn't put it past him because he is enough of a maverick to do this. Of course that wouldn't be the only reason and he would be killing two birds with one stone.

Because of my background I'm really interested in Yangcrates' pedagogy and in that regard I'm of the view that the show is well-written. He's a true devotee of the socratic method. He seldom gives away the answers and pushes his learners to discover the answers for themselves. He gives them just enough to either hang themselves or save themselves. It's how he deals with his adversaries as well as his students. He gave Prosecutor Jin the heads up on Assemblyman Ko -- not everything but just enough to get him thinking and for the latter to go and find his own answers. During Ye-seul's trial, there was a moment when he told the story about a colleague who asked him out and he turned her down. Her behaviour afterwards was puzzling to him. Prosecutor Baek who was the unnamed colleague inevitably stood up and fell into his "trap" defensively by inadvertently providing the answer to the inconsistencies in Ye-seul's responses. It was a masterful moment. But more importantly a learning moment in Professor Yang's classroom.

I don't agree that the show has a muddled view of the law at all. On the contrary it has a very lucid perspective on what the law is. The law is a sword (or any weapon of choice) and depending on who wields it, the consequences can be for good or for ill. At the end of the day it is only a tool, an instrument. The crucial factor is the man or woman brandishing it. The reality is that whether we like it or not, the law is co-opted in service of all kinds of unholy endeavours. Prosecutor Jin's indictment is a great example of how laws intended for good can be abused in the wrong hands. But those are the risks civilized societies take having bedrock principles such a presumption of innocence, reasonable doubt, the right to representation etc.

Ultimately winning and losing in the courtroom is about the ability to prosecute arguments convincingly based on precedent and evidence. That has been a consistent message all throughout and one that Yangcrates' teaching style is calculated to instill. Right from the start he's been telling the...

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kids to do their homework because at the end of the day its the application of specific laws to the cases on hand that matters.

As for Professor Kim, she's a great multidimensional female character as befits a former judge. I suppose she labours under the assumption that there are no perfect solutions, only trade-offs. I don't think the show condones or condemns what she does but there are always reasons why she does what she does. Plus it gives her influence over Assemblyman Ko. A really shrewd operator.

It's a nutty show on some level but it has a nasty streak of realism running right through it.

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I really like your assessment of show and in particular, your assessment of the characters Professor Yang and Professor Kim. Very well written 👍🏾

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Thank you. Appreciate the comment.

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Law School is a magical blade that has Realism carved on one side, and Fantasy on the other side.

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I like that. Thanks.

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You are right, the show has presented us a strong argument about fighting for justice under the rule of law, and the issue is the human behind it, not the law itself. This is, as some of us has agreed all these along, a pretty strong argument against vigilante justice presented in Taxi Driver and Vincenzo.

As this show is about to end, I am looking forward to another show arguing about justice and law. The Devil Judge, opening July 3 on tvN, will probably further explore the sometimes conflicting relationship between public opinion and justice system. See you all there.

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You said it perfectly: " Law School has a unique talent for being boring and hard to follow at the same time."

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I had the same problems as you did with these set of episodes, Anisa. Law School suddenly wants to be a crime drama when it was supposed to be a character-driven analysis of justice.
(Also I think @Lilium pedagogical analysis is spot on but I disagree that this means the drama as a whole is well-written, rather than Yangcrates character and the way he behaves through the whole show).

As with a lot of similar dramas, the characterisation is amazing (with one small exception that you touched on in your recap as well - the inexplicable 180 of Prosecutor Jin) and thus the show should have stayed being character driven while allowing the overarching plotline to be resolved more organically and with less ridiculous "twists" -
I'm assuming that justice can win even if somebody doesn't impersonate their identical twin for example.

My biggest issue with these episodes, and the one that really left a bad taste in my mouth, was the aforementioned 180 of Prosecutor Jin. This guy did some seriously distasteful things, so many I can't even list them. He pursued malicious prosecutions under orders from a member of politics (this is a breach of the separation of powers), he reused to prosecute crimes for the same reason. He broke the law on more than one occasion, he helped drive a man to his death. And despite all of this we're supposed to think he didn't know what he was doing?

Since when is "he was under orders from a politician" a reason for a member of the judiciary to avoid culpability for his crimes?

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I definitely agree with you that the characters are very well written but the drama as a whole is not, and I have a hunch that's why the reactions to this show are so polarizing. I think we're all enjoying different things about this show, which is great of course.

But yes, for me things like Jin getting off scot free (for.. what? decoupling his train from Go's once he was obviously about to go over a cliff?) really sour the experience. That's not a reason for him to get away with all the shady crap you mentioned - I had forgotten all the details so it's even worse than I thought lol. And I do feel like the writer often sacrifices logic like this in service of particular outcomes she wants often enough that it makes my enjoyment of the drama as a whole pretty uneven.

I did like the finale a lot more than these episodes though, which you'll see once that weecap is published! :)

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